SMOKE SIGNAL NEWS - September 2014

SMOKE SIGNAL NEWS

SEPTEMBER 2014

 

 

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Labor Day

September 1

International Peace Day

September 21

Autumn Begins

September 21

 

May the radiant joy of spirit move all this gift will touch.


 

Manataka Council Fire

 

The Manataka Council Fire is a new feature that will be submitted each month by Michael Eye of Eagle Feather Burton, Chair of the Manataka American Indian Council.  Send your comments and questions to Mike Burton.

 

Dear Manataka Members and Friends,

 

Around the August Council Fire, the Elders discussed the four important topics:  

 

Education Task Force

Manataka intends to create an educational program for elementary, middle, and high school classrooms, based on American Indian  values and culture. This project will support our mission to preserve American Indian culture and values. Dr. Reverend Fred Wilcoxson heads the Manataka Education Committee.  He asks for your support.  If you are a teacher or retired educator or have education administration experience, we need your help to create an innovative and powerful curriculum.  Education Committee

 

Background: Education Task Force

 

Manataka American Sacred Grounds has been in the works since the site was donated to Manataka in 2011. Ceremonies are being performed there and it was cleared for the "Moment Gathering."  What I am about to do, has never been done in recent history of Manataka, and I am doing it so we can move forward with our plans to develop the Sacred Grounds. 

 

The Amphitheater on the grounds would provide a place for telling the Manataka Story and the presentation of music and dance performances.  The Peace Gardens would be a lasting memorial to the history of Manataka and a place to perform sacred ceremonies.  The site is on the sacred mountain and close enough to hike in and experience the mountain and nature's beauty.  http://www.manataka.org/page1392.html


I ask every member give a contribution today!  If you are a grantwriter or have experience in fundraising, I pray the spirit will move you to give of your time, money, and expertise. Please give what you can, and we will make this museum a reality!!


Elder Council Nominations

There is also need for elders among our membership to come forward and serve on the elder council. You can contact me or email Manataka.

 

Women's Council

The Women's Council needs you!  If you live in Arkansas or far away, it make no difference.  There is a place for you in the Women's Council.  We need a new chairwoman and many ladies to lead the way. Should the spirit move you to want to participate email me or Manataka and we will add you to the list of women already going to participate and we will plan a greeting/gathering.

 

Thank you all for your continued support of Manataka.  I ask the Great Spirit to move within our organization an create something, better and long lasting. Preserving the past while creating a brighter and peaceful future. I am forever your brother... Mike Eye of Eagle Feather Burton, Chairman.  918-906-0211   501-760-5603

 

 


 

ELDERS SPEAK

 

"But in the Indian Spirit the land is still vested; it will be until other men are able to divine and meet its rhythm. Men must be born and reborn to belong. Their bodies must be formed of the dust of their forefathers' bones."  -- Luther Standing Bear, OGLALA SIOUX

 

It is said when we walk on the Earth, we are walking on our ancestors and our unborn children. This is the relationship Native People have with the Earth. It is this relationship which gives insight into the Earth's rhythm and heartbeat and creates the feeling of belonging. If you feel you belong to something, you'll treat it with respect. If you feel you are above something, you'll treat it with disrespect. Indian Spirituality is tied to the Earth. We belong to the Earth along with all other creatures on the Earth. Align to this realization.

 

Great Spirit, today, teach me to respect the Earth Mother.

 

Copyright: Coyhis Publishing found in the book, Meditations with Native American Elders: Any republishing of part or all of their contents is prohibited.

 

 At Manataka we very well understand the message of Luther Standing Bear.  At Manataka, these sacred grounds are controlled and desecrated every day by a power that has no understanding, no compassion, no love for the land.  The temporary superintendant of the Hot Springs National Park Service, Josie Fernandez was born in Communist Cuba and was well indoctrinated in black-boot thinking.  Her spirit will answer for the ugliness.  ~Lee Standing Bear Moore 

 


 

NEW FLASH

 

Eagle Feather Case WON in Federal Court!

In 2006, enforcement officers from the Department of the Interior came to a Texas powwow and confiscated 42 sacred eagle feathers being worn by dancers.  Robert Soto, a Lipan Apache and pastor, was one of those dancers, who peacefully gave up his eagle feathers, but he had just begun to fight!  He fought seven long years in Federal courts.  Manataka received the notice below on August 12, 2014 that Robert won his case against the Department of the Interior. 

 

Below are links about the history of the case and related stories.

 

 

To Manataka Friends:

To all my family, friends and those who I have never met but have been supporting us since March 11, 2006 - first of all, thank you so very much for your support these last seven and a half years. But today, I want to announce to you that we have won our Eagle Feather lawsuit, McAllen Grace Brethren Church, et al v. U.S. Attorney General USDC No. 7:07-CV-60, against the Department of Interior in The United States Court of Appeals for the Fifty Circuit. I'm not sure what all this means except for now, WE HAVE WON! I will be talking to my lawyers on Saturday when they come to speak to us at our Native church service and will write more later as more information is given. We do have to appear one more time in the lower district court to sort of finalize the decision. Continue to pray for us. For now, I would like to thank three individuals. First and foremost, I thank my Lord and my Savior Jesus for His helping hand in our lives. Secondly, I would like to thank our lawyers, Milo Colton of the Cherokee Nation and Marisa Salazar of the Lipan Apache Tribe of Texas for their endless and tireless continual work these last seven and a half years. Then, thank you to my wife, our family and friends who have stood with us through this whole ordeal. As I stated earlier, I will write more later as more information becomes available. So as it stands, we have won this part of the battle. Keep the next episode of this lawsuit in prayer as we return to the lower district court for the finalizing of the decision. God bless, Robert Soto Lipan Apache from the Lipan Apache Tribe of Texas and Pastor of McAllen Grace Brethren Church

 

Eagle Feathers Confiscated

Federal Government Creates Two Classes of American Indians...

An American Indian accuses federal agents

Time for New Eagle Feather Law

Symbolism of the Eagle Feather

 

 

 

 


 

OPINION

 

 

MASCOTS

 

On Wednesday, June 20, the United States Patent and Trademark Office cancelled the trademark registration for the Washington Redskins, because Federal trademark law does not permit registration of trademarks that may “disparage” individuals or groups or “bring them into contempt or disrepute.”

This is not the first time the trademark has come into question, but our hope is that the ruling will lead the Washington football team owners to reconsider their stance that a stereotype can be a source of pride, and the claim that the name and logo honor Native Americans.

Over twenty years ago, when the team trademark was first formally challenged, the National Museum of the American Indian was in its infancy.  In the time since, we have contributed to the national discussion of the persistence of stereotypes and misconceptions in our society, and helped to educate thousands of visitors about Native cultures. Your support as a member has helped us to make a difference.

While the team currently insists that this ruling will have no effect on the right to use the its name and logo, this new development adds to the dialogue and builds on the momentum in recent years to encourage the team to change its name.  The Trademark Trial and Appeal Board's specific finding that the name of the team is a disparaging reference to Native Americans puts added pressure on the team and ownership to reconsider the team name.

We will continue to follow the developments in this important case, while maintaining our position that the cultivation of painful stereotypes should not be celebrated, but rather corrected and replaced with the celebration of real Native American people, their cultures, and all they have contributed to shape our country and our world.

 

Sincerely,

Kevin



Kevin Gover (Pawnee)
Director

 


Manataka Offering Edible Insects!

 

The Manataka American Indian Council has teamed up with World Entomophagy, Inc. to bring you fine quality, eco-friendly, safe and wonderfully tasting edible insects that have been processed for ready-to-use recipes.  

 

Manataka believes that eating insects (entomophagy) is very healthy and one day will become a tremendously beneficial food source for the United States and help alleviate the global food crisis.  Unlike beef, chicken and other livestock that consumes over one-third of the food crops grown in the U.S., insects can be raised on a small fraction of feed.  Livestock also creates 20% of polluting greenhouse gases such as methane and ammonia that are 23 times more powerful than carbon dioxide. The total population of insects worldwide do not produce any significant harmful gases.  Beef and other grazing livestock also consume a great deal of agricultural land, labor and resources.  With insects there are no veterinary bills, no problem with manure disposal, and a lot less cost to process and package.

 

According to Aletheia Price in our article, Eating Bugs!!, "Raising insects is environmentally friendly. They require minimal space per pound of protein produced, have a better feed to meat ratio than any other animal you can raise, and are very low on the food chain. They are healthy, tasty, and have been utilized for the entire history of mankind (after all, it is easier to catch a grub than a mammoth)."

 

There are over 1,400 recorded species of edible insects that can be raised in eco-clean environments.  Compared to beef, lamb, pork, birds and fish, insects contain a lot more protein and less fat and calories.  Yet, insects are chalked full of many vitamins and minerals.  Eating insects may seem yucky, but you may not realize that every person inadvertently consumes over a pound of insects in their lifetime found in processed foods.


Insects are tasty. Really!  
BUY NOW!


"If there is a shadow of a doubt someplace, that will cause a weakness."  -- Wallace Black Elk, Lakota


 

HEALTH WATCH - GROUNDING - EARTHING

 

 

Do You Have Knowledge of the Past to Share? 

Martin Zucker, co-author of the Earthing book

 

Since the beginning of the year, I have provided a series of articles to Smoke Signal News – and you, the readers – about the “discovery” of remarkable healing benefits that occur when we humans make direct skin contact with the ground beneath our feet.

 

The discovery – called Earthing (or grounding) – has been validated by a series of unique studies over the last ten years indicating such contact generates better sleep, less inflammation and pain, better blood flow, and greater energy. The sum total of these clearly effects rises to the status of a magnificent environmental influence on the physiology and a missing link in the common formula for better health: eating well, getting adequate physical exercise and sunlight, and stress reduction. 

 

Connection with Mother Earth belongs smack in the middle of that list. 

 

That’s because we are disconnected.  Modern lifestyle includes the use of synthetic-soled footwear that insulates us from the natural, gentle electric energy on the surface of the Earth that, surprisingly, has so many significant benefits.  Unlike past generations – those of your ancestors up to perhaps your grandparents and great-grandparents − we no longer wear footwear made from animal hides that conduct the energy.  And, of course, we no longer sleep on the Earth or on conductive hides as we did in the past. Today, most of us live and work separated from the ground, and in high rises very high off the ground.  READ MORE...

 


 

ELDERS SPEAK

 

Sleeping Grandfather Mountain

"Respect should be given those indigenous nations who still carry on their ceremonies; still following the ancient laws of nature with songs and ceremonies."  - Oren R. Lyons, Spokesman, Traditional Circle of Elders

 

Many of our Tribes still have the ceremonies, songs and traditions. Today, the ceremonies and songs are coming back even stronger. The Elders have a lot of this knowledge. The young people need to learn these songs and traditions from the Elders. This is the strength of the people. The ancient Wisdom and Knowledge of ancient Laws are hidden in the ceremonies and songs. We should seek out these songs and ceremonies.

 

Great Spirit, teach me the songs and ceremonies. Make my eyes open to see.

Copyright: Coyhis Publishing found in the book, Meditations with Native American Elders: Any republishing of part or all of their contents is prohibited.

 

We respect and love those who come to Manataka to celebrate and share their ancient ceremonies and songs.  We assist when ever possible with facilitating those ceremonies in the manner and fashion of their tribe. Traditions among tribes are different like all creation and deserving of our respect. ~Lee Standing Bear Moore 

 


 

FEATURE


The Great Remembering:  Part I

More Important than the 'Great Forgetting'

 by Takatoka - Lee Standing Bear Moore

 

Before you read this article, go to Have You Heard of The Great Forgetting?


We are thankful to Daniel Quinn who first wrote about the Great Forgetting in a book entitled the "Story of B", followed with a sequel entitled "Ishmael". The longer, original essay is entitled Daniel Quinn: The Great Forgetting. We highly recommend it. Also see Manataka's article, Have You Heard of The Great Forgetting?, republished from deep-ecology-hub.com.

The Great Forgetting speaks about the wealth of knowledge that our culture lost when we adopted our new civilized lifestyle over 10,000 years ago. It is the breadth and depth of knowledge that gave indigenous people the ability survive and have healthy, happy lives.

According to Quinn,
"All of this disappeared in a few short generations... The Great Forgetting accounts for an enormous cultural collapse as once tribal people found themselves in a new and strange mass centralized society. New beliefs, new ways of life rushed into this cultural vacuum to fill the void. But without being tested by natural selection over thousands of years this new culture was evolutionarily unstable."

 

Recent discussion about the Great Forgetting has opened a new perception that unveils a number of answers about our modern "destructive culture... remembering what it is that was forgotten holds the key to our future."  ~Daniel Quinn

We agree with Quinn's insight and understanding of the Great Forgetting that occurred thousands of years ago. But, a newer, greater revolution is about to happen that will correct the error of mass worldwide forgetting. It is called, the Great Remembering."  READ MORE...

 


 

FEATURE

 

REQUEST FOR SHEEPHERDERS & HUMAN RIGHTS OBSERVERS

 

“This land is being taken away because they’ve got power in Washington. We were put here with our Four Sacred Mountains and we were created to live here. We know the names of the mountains and we know the names of the other sacred places. That is our power. That is how we pray and this prayer has never changed.” ~Katherine Smith, Big Mountain Matriarch
 
The Black Mesa Indigenous Support Collective and the Manataka American Indian Council has been asked to pass on requests for direct on-land support from Dineh (Navajo) families in the following communities on Black Mesa: Thin Rock Mesa, Big Mountain, Wide Ruins, Owl Springs, Teesto, Mosquito Springs, Cactus Valley, Sage Springs, Horse Corral, Star Mountain, Red Willow Springs, Great Springs, and Buckskin Well.

For four decades these communities have fought to stop the U.S. government and Peabody Energy Company's exploitation of their homelands and communities. Today families remain, steadfastly resisting the mine, colonialism, and forced relocation. Families' resistance to forced relocation puts them on the front lines of the struggle against resource colonialism in the form of large-scale coal mining.    
READ MORE...

 


 

ENVIRONMENT

 

Lead Ammunition and Tackle is Deadly!

Oregon State University, July 9, 2014
 

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The ingestion of lead ammunition and lead fishing tackle accounts for illness and mortality in more than 120 different species of birds in North America, according to a newly published review of scientific studies on the issue.

 

What impact that has at the population level for species is less clear, the researchers say, as is how to deal with the growing controversy over the use of lead for hunting and fishing. The lead issue is complex and steps to mitigate the impacts will be challenging – from cost and performance factors to manufacturing output – but they are possible, the authors point out.

 

“Although lead shot has been banned for waterfowl hunting in the United States since 1991, and in Canada since 1999, exposure to lead remains a problem for many bird species,” said Susan Haig, supervisory wildlife ecologist with the U.S. Geological Survey and lead author on the study. “However, we did find several examples of ways wildlife managers have helped reduce exposure of birds to lead.”   READ MORE...
 


 

STUDENT LIFE

 

 

NATIVE PEOPLES CLUB

 

 MERAMEC CAMPUS

By R. Nyk Lindsoe

 

 

[The Manataka American Indian Council is proud to welcome the Native Peoples Club to the growing list of college and university student groups around the country who strive to preserve indigenous culture and advance understanding of its contributions to modern life.]

 

Here in East Central Missouri and West Central Illinois, where once proud peoples built the Mound City at Cahokia, IL, hunted this land, farmed its fields, fished the rivers and lived their lives in harmony with nature we seem to have suffered a tragic loss.

 

I am Nyk Lindsoe, a full time student at Meramec Campus, St Louis Community College in Kirkwood, MO., a suburb of St. Louis, MO. When I registered for classes I became curious about the origins of the name, Meramec. I knew it was also the name of nearby river but no one actually knew what it meant or its origins. I decided to find out. It took me a matter of minutes, not hours, not days, not years but minutes to learn that Meramec is an Algonquian word meaning “Ugly Fish”.  It seems the native peoples named it for the catfish which is an ugly fish to some, but great eating to most. Irrespective of its meaning, Meramec is a Native Peoples’ name which has lost its meaning in our present cultures as have the contributions of the people who created it. I find that to be very tragic.  READ MORE...               

 


 

 

FEATURE

 

Here’s Why You Shouldn’t Wear A Native American Headdress

Music fest-goers -- take note.

Pharrell Williams drew some heat on June 4, 2014 for wearing a Native American headdress on the cover of Elle UK, leading the singer to apologize for what many considered cultural appropriation of a sacred tradition — despite the fact that he is part Native American.

 

“I respect and honor every kind of race, background and culture,” he said via a rep. “I am genuinely sorry.”

 

Still, Skateboard P is far from the first celeb to cross cultural lines and ruffle feathers (no pun intended). Gwen Stefani, musician Christina Fallin and a cadre of Victoria Secret models have all donned headdresses, as have numerous festival-goers the world over. Hit up any music fest — from Electric Daisy to Pitchfork — and you’re sure to see some sunburned dude in a full war bonnet.

Yup, the trend does not seem to be dissipating — despite outrage — the issue perhaps being that these gleeful feather-wearers are simply uninformed.

 

In light of Pharrell’s recent apology, and in prep for the long summer festival experience before us, MTV News hit up a series of experts and people in the Native American community to ask them all the questions you’ve ever wanted to pose about headdresses:

 

1). What Does Wearing A Headdress Mean?    READ MORE...

 


 

BOOK REVIEWS

 

This month we focus on herbal medicine -- the magnificent benefits of healing and nourishment brought to us by the Creator of All Things.   Like the sacred plant people, your purchase will help Manataka grow!

 

Sacred Smoke

The Ancient Art of Smudging for Modern Times

This classic book on smudging explains and illustrates an integral part of traditional Native American life. Learn to make smudge sticks and to identify, gather, and grow a wide range of sacred plants for smudging. Featured plants include bayberry, cedar, desert sage, fennel, mugwort, mullein, sweetgrass, and yerba santa. Includes valuable advice on how to reclaim and find personal traditions and healing rituals. Author: Harvest McCampbell  ISBN: 9781570671173   Page Count: 128  Width: 6.0 Height: 9.0   Softcover  Publisher: Native Voices 2002  Price:  $9.95   

 

 

 

Plants of Power

By Alfred Savinelli

Native American Ceremony and the Use of Sacred Plants. Revised Edition. This comprehensive guide to the sacred plants traditionally used by Native Americans and other Indigenous peoples presents 14 significant plants, with information on their properties, growing conditions, and medicinal applications (incense cedar, red cedar, copal, juniper, lavender, mugwort, osha, pinon, white sage, desert sage, sweet grass, ceremonial tabacco, red willow bark and yerba santa). Descriptions of Native American ceremonies and rituals in which these plants play a central role are included.  ISBN: 9781570671302  Page Count: 128  Width: 6.0 Height: 9.0   Softcover  Publisher: Native Voices 2002  Price:  $11.95  

 

 

 

 Native Plants Native Healing

Traditional Muskogee Way.  The Cherokee and Hitchiti author shares his knowledge of medicinal uses of plants and traditional Native root-doctoring techniques. Readers learn how to identify, honor, and select common wild plants and are given information about responsible harvesting versus cultivation. The author explains how to prepare liniments, lotions, oils, salves, teas, and tinctures, and recommends specific remedies for numerous ailments. A must for beginners as well as serious students of herbology. Indexed by both plant name and medical topic. Illustrated and indexed by plant name and medical topic.  Author Tis Mal Crow also worked internationally with indigenous healers and herbal groups to promote the medicinal uses of herbs and the conservation of the wild habitat needed to sustain the growth of medicinal herbs.  ISBN:  9781570671050 Page Count: 144  Publisher: Native Voices 2001 Width: 6.0 Height: 9.0 Softcover.  Price: $12.95

Field to Fork: Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley - See more at: http://indiangiver.firstnations.org/nl140506-01/#sthash.DkuNMPxg.dpuf
Field to Fork: Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley - See more at: http://indiangiver.firstnations.org/nl140506-01/#sthash.DkuNMPxg.dpuf
Field to Fork: Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley - See more at: http://indiangiver.firstnations.org/nl140506-01/#sthash.DkuNMPxg.dpuf
Field to Fork: Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley - See more at: http://indiangiver.firstnations.org/nl140506-01/#sthash.DkuNMPxg.dpuf
The Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley is located on the Big Pine Indian Reservation in California, at the foot of the Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains. The tribe’s early ancestors utilized the land and water to create irrigated areas that produced the tribe’s main food source. However, at the turn of the twentieth century, the city of Los Angeles purchased most of the land and water rights in the Owens Valley and transferred them to the Los Angeles basin, thus severing the tribe’s connection with the land and water and interfering with its ability to feed its own people.

Today, the Big Pine Reservation is considered a “food desert” because of the lack of access to healthy and affordable food. In 2010, the tribe established the Sustainable Food System Development Project to transform its food desert into a more robust, sustainable food system by establishing a permaculture garden.

In 2013, First Nations awarded the Big Pine Paiute Tribe $37,500 through the Native Agriculture and Food Sovereignty Initiative (NAFSI) to expand the permaculture garden to include a demonstration site, a fruit orchard, a seed bank, and a weekly farmers’ market. This grant, underwritten by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, has allowed the tribe to develop an innovative field-to-fork model that will sustain the community for generations to come.

This grant allowed the tribe to expand their small permaculture garden into a larger educational community garden that teaches tribal members how to plant, grow and harvest healthy, organic heirloom fruits and vegetables as well as Native plants and medicine. The tribe used the expanded permaculture garden as a demonstration site to conduct several classes and workshops, including a three-day intensive permaculture course, food policy/sovereignty classes, youth mentoring sessions, and numerous gardening workshops.

The gardening workshops, in particular, have been very popular among tribal members. At these workshops, tribal members learn about composting, caring for plants and respecting ecosystems. Many workshop participants used these lessons to create their own personal home gardens. These workshops encouraged tribal members to start their own gardens while simultaneously attending to the community garden. As a result of these hands-on workshops, tribal members helped plant, grow and harvest more than 100 pounds of squash, cucumbers, tomatoes, green beans and bell peppers that were eventually donated to the tribal grocery store.

Many tribal members also volunteered at the expanded permaculture garden site outside of these workshops. For example, several volunteers helped plant 50 perennial fruit trees. The trees did not yield any fruit this season. However, once these trees mature, they have the potential to yield hundreds of pounds of fruit. These trees will produce healthy, fresh fruit for generations. The tribe speculates that eventually they will need to hire more workers to maintain the fruit orchard and the ever-expanding permaculture garden.

The tribe determined which fruits and vegetables to plant in the permaculture garden by conducting a community survey. This survey also helped the tribe determine which seeds to collect and store for the seed bank. The purpose of the seed bank is to gather the seeds of plants originally grown in the region and preserve them for future generations. The seed bank is a continuing process that will grow as the tribe becomes more and more aware of its needs and learns proper seed-saving techniques.

A portion of this grant was also used to host weekly farmers’ markets that helped farmers and workshop participants sell their fruits and vegetables. These farmers markets are intended to help growers earn extra money and provide tribal members with a healthy alternative to processed foods.

The Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley developed the Sustainable Food System Development Project to improve the physical health and well-being of their people and to preserve their tribal community for generations to come. The success of this innovative field-to-fork model reiterates that tribes have the potential to strengthen and improve their own communities.

By Sarah Hernandez, First Nations Program Coordinator

- See more at: http://indiangiver.firstnations.org/nl140506-01/#sthash.DkuNMPxg.dpuf
The Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley is located on the Big Pine Indian Reservation in California, at the foot of the Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains. The tribe’s early ancestors utilized the land and water to create irrigated areas that produced the tribe’s main food source. However, at the turn of the twentieth century, the city of Los Angeles purchased most of the land and water rights in the Owens Valley and transferred them to the Los Angeles basin, thus severing the tribe’s connection with the land and water and interfering with its ability to feed its own people.

Today, the Big Pine Reservation is considered a “food desert” because of the lack of access to healthy and affordable food. In 2010, the tribe established the Sustainable Food System Development Project to transform its food desert into a more robust, sustainable food system by establishing a permaculture garden.

In 2013, First Nations awarded the Big Pine Paiute Tribe $37,500 through the Native Agriculture and Food Sovereignty Initiative (NAFSI) to expand the permaculture garden to include a demonstration site, a fruit orchard, a seed bank, and a weekly farmers’ market. This grant, underwritten by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, has allowed the tribe to develop an innovative field-to-fork model that will sustain the community for generations to come.

This grant allowed the tribe to expand their small permaculture garden into a larger educational community garden that teaches tribal members how to plant, grow and harvest healthy, organic heirloom fruits and vegetables as well as Native plants and medicine. The tribe used the expanded permaculture garden as a demonstration site to conduct several classes and workshops, including a three-day intensive permaculture course, food policy/sovereignty classes, youth mentoring sessions, and numerous gardening workshops.

The gardening workshops, in particular, have been very popular among tribal members. At these workshops, tribal members learn about composting, caring for plants and respecting ecosystems. Many workshop participants used these lessons to create their own personal home gardens. These workshops encouraged tribal members to start their own gardens while simultaneously attending to the community garden. As a result of these hands-on workshops, tribal members helped plant, grow and harvest more than 100 pounds of squash, cucumbers, tomatoes, green beans and bell peppers that were eventually donated to the tribal grocery store.

Many tribal members also volunteered at the expanded permaculture garden site outside of these workshops. For example, several volunteers helped plant 50 perennial fruit trees. The trees did not yield any fruit this season. However, once these trees mature, they have the potential to yield hundreds of pounds of fruit. These trees will produce healthy, fresh fruit for generations. The tribe speculates that eventually they will need to hire more workers to maintain the fruit orchard and the ever-expanding permaculture garden.

The tribe determined which fruits and vegetables to plant in the permaculture garden by conducting a community survey. This survey also helped the tribe determine which seeds to collect and store for the seed bank. The purpose of the seed bank is to gather the seeds of plants originally grown in the region and preserve them for future generations. The seed bank is a continuing process that will grow as the tribe becomes more and more aware of its needs and learns proper seed-saving techniques.

A portion of this grant was also used to host weekly farmers’ markets that helped farmers and workshop participants sell their fruits and vegetables. These farmers markets are intended to help growers earn extra money and provide tribal members with a healthy alternative to processed foods.

The Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley developed the Sustainable Food System Development Project to improve the physical health and well-being of their people and to preserve their tribal community for generations to come. The success of this innovative field-to-fork model reiterates that tribes have the potential to strengthen and improve their own communities.

By Sarah Hernandez, First Nations Program Coordinator

- See more at: http://indiangiver.firstnations.org/nl140506-01/#sthash.DkuNMPxg.dpuf
The Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley is located on the Big Pine Indian Reservation in California, at the foot of the Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains. The tribe’s early ancestors utilized the land and water to create irrigated areas that produced the tribe’s main food source. However, at the turn of the twentieth century, the city of Los Angeles purchased most of the land and water rights in the Owens Valley and transferred them to the Los Angeles basin, thus severing the tribe’s connection with the land and water and interfering with its ability to feed its own people.

Today, the Big Pine Reservation is considered a “food desert” because of the lack of access to healthy and affordable food. In 2010, the tribe established the Sustainable Food System Development Project to transform its food desert into a more robust, sustainable food system by establishing a permaculture garden.

In 2013, First Nations awarded the Big Pine Paiute Tribe $37,500 through the Native Agriculture and Food Sovereignty Initiative (NAFSI) to expand the permaculture garden to include a demonstration site, a fruit orchard, a seed bank, and a weekly farmers’ market. This grant, underwritten by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, has allowed the tribe to develop an innovative field-to-fork model that will sustain the community for generations to come.

This grant allowed the tribe to expand their small permaculture garden into a larger educational community garden that teaches tribal members how to plant, grow and harvest healthy, organic heirloom fruits and vegetables as well as Native plants and medicine. The tribe used the expanded permaculture garden as a demonstration site to conduct several classes and workshops, including a three-day intensive permaculture course, food policy/sovereignty classes, youth mentoring sessions, and numerous gardening workshops.

The gardening workshops, in particular, have been very popular among tribal members. At these workshops, tribal members learn about composting, caring for plants and respecting ecosystems. Many workshop participants used these lessons to create their own personal home gardens. These workshops encouraged tribal members to start their own gardens while simultaneously attending to the community garden. As a result of these hands-on workshops, tribal members helped plant, grow and harvest more than 100 pounds of squash, cucumbers, tomatoes, green beans and bell peppers that were eventually donated to the tribal grocery store.

Many tribal members also volunteered at the expanded permaculture garden site outside of these workshops. For example, several volunteers helped plant 50 perennial fruit trees. The trees did not yield any fruit this season. However, once these trees mature, they have the potential to yield hundreds of pounds of fruit. These trees will produce healthy, fresh fruit for generations. The tribe speculates that eventually they will need to hire more workers to maintain the fruit orchard and the ever-expanding permaculture garden.

The tribe determined which fruits and vegetables to plant in the permaculture garden by conducting a community survey. This survey also helped the tribe determine which seeds to collect and store for the seed bank. The purpose of the seed bank is to gather the seeds of plants originally grown in the region and preserve them for future generations. The seed bank is a continuing process that will grow as the tribe becomes more and more aware of its needs and learns proper seed-saving techniques.

A portion of this grant was also used to host weekly farmers’ markets that helped farmers and workshop participants sell their fruits and vegetables. These farmers markets are intended to help growers earn extra money and provide tribal members with a healthy alternative to processed foods.

The Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley developed the Sustainable Food System Development Project to improve the physical health and well-being of their people and to preserve their tribal community for generations to come. The success of this innovative field-to-fork model reiterates that tribes have the potential to strengthen and improve their own communities.

By Sarah Hernandez, First Nations Program Coordinator

- See more at: http://indiangiver.firstnations.org/nl140506-01/#sthash.DkuNMPxg.dpuf
The Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley is located on the Big Pine Indian Reservation in California, at the foot of the Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains. The tribe’s early ancestors utilized the land and water to create irrigated areas that produced the tribe’s main food source. However, at the turn of the twentieth century, the city of Los Angeles purchased most of the land and water rights in the Owens Valley and transferred them to the Los Angeles basin, thus severing the tribe’s connection with the land and water and interfering with its ability to feed its own people.

Today, the Big Pine Reservation is considered a “food desert” because of the lack of access to healthy and affordable food. In 2010, the tribe established the Sustainable Food System Development Project to transform its food desert into a more robust, sustainable food system by establishing a permaculture garden.

In 2013, First Nations awarded the Big Pine Paiute Tribe $37,500 through the Native Agriculture and Food Sovereignty Initiative (NAFSI) to expand the permaculture garden to include a demonstration site, a fruit orchard, a seed bank, and a weekly farmers’ market. This grant, underwritten by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, has allowed the tribe to develop an innovative field-to-fork model that will sustain the community for generations to come.

This grant allowed the tribe to expand their small permaculture garden into a larger educational community garden that teaches tribal members how to plant, grow and harvest healthy, organic heirloom fruits and vegetables as well as Native plants and medicine. The tribe used the expanded permaculture garden as a demonstration site to conduct several classes and workshops, including a three-day intensive permaculture course, food policy/sovereignty classes, youth mentoring sessions, and numerous gardening workshops.

The gardening workshops, in particular, have been very popular among tribal members. At these workshops, tribal members learn about composting, caring for plants and respecting ecosystems. Many workshop participants used these lessons to create their own personal home gardens. These workshops encouraged tribal members to start their own gardens while simultaneously attending to the community garden. As a result of these hands-on workshops, tribal members helped plant, grow and harvest more than 100 pounds of squash, cucumbers, tomatoes, green beans and bell peppers that were eventually donated to the tribal grocery store.

Many tribal members also volunteered at the expanded permaculture garden site outside of these workshops. For example, several volunteers helped plant 50 perennial fruit trees. The trees did not yield any fruit this season. However, once these trees mature, they have the potential to yield hundreds of pounds of fruit. These trees will produce healthy, fresh fruit for generations. The tribe speculates that eventually they will need to hire more workers to maintain the fruit orchard and the ever-expanding permaculture garden.

The tribe determined which fruits and vegetables to plant in the permaculture garden by conducting a community survey. This survey also helped the tribe determine which seeds to collect and store for the seed bank. The purpose of the seed bank is to gather the seeds of plants originally grown in the region and preserve them for future generations. The seed bank is a continuing process that will grow as the tribe becomes more and more aware of its needs and learns proper seed-saving techniques.

A portion of this grant was also used to host weekly farmers’ markets that helped farmers and workshop participants sell their fruits and vegetables. These farmers markets are intended to help growers earn extra money and provide tribal members with a healthy alternative to processed foods.

The Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley developed the Sustainable Food System Development Project to improve the physical health and well-being of their people and to preserve their tribal community for generations to come. The success of this innovative field-to-fork model reiterates that tribes have the potential to strengthen and improve their own communities.

By Sarah Hernandez, First Nations Program Coordinator

- See more at: http://indiangiver.firstnations.org/nl140506-01/#sthash.DkuNMPxg.dpuf

 

ENVIRONMENT -- ANIMAL RIGHTS

 

This letter was sent to the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska on July 21.  We encourage you to copy this letter or compose one of your own regarding the slaughter of Brown Bears.   Copy name and email address are below.

 

Andy Loranger, Refuge Manager

Kenai National Wildlife Refuge

Email:

 

 


                               

Manataka American Indian Council

P.O. Box 476, Hot Springs, Arkansas  USA  71902-0476

501-627-0555

manataka@sbcglobalnet * http://www.manataka.org

 

Michael E. Burton, Chairman/ Trustee

Monroe Loy, Vice Chairman/ Trustee

Lee Standing Bear Moore, Secretary/ Trustee

Dr. Rev. Fred Wilcoxson, Education Chairman

Robert Gray Hawk Coke, Counseling Elder

Rev. Linda Two Hawk Feathers James, Ceremonial Elder

John James, Membership Elder

Jimmy Keefauver, Events Elder

Rev. David Quite Wind Furr, Chairman Emeritus/ Trustee

     

 

Mr. Loranger,

 

We are writing to urge you to issue an immediate emergency closure of Kenai National Wildlife Refuge lands to brown bear hunting. We applaud the refuge for its many attempts to engage with the state of Alaska over management of Kenai brown bear, and for banning bear baiting. But enough is enough: Refuge lands are specifically for conserving brown bear populations, and Alaska's management practices continue to work against those aims.

 

The Kenai brown bear population is small and highly sensitive to adult female mortality. Last year alone 18 percent of the adult female bears were killed. And this year, during the spring hunt, an additional 10 percent of the population was shot. The state of Alaska has made it clear that its goal is a drastic reduction in the bears' populations to increase moose numbers for the benefit of human hunters.

 

We can't let this happen. Due to the high number of bears already killed this spring, the refuge must close its lands to brown bear hunting this fall to fulfill its mission to conserve bear populations and their critical habitat. The Funny River fire was an additional stress or, and likely most severely affected young cubs and their mothers, who are critical to the population's long-term survival.

 

Please -- give the bears a break and close refuge lands to bear hunting this fall.

 

Sincerely,

 

Lee Standing Bear Moore, Secretary

Manataka American Indian Council

 


 

ELDERS SPEAK...

 

"For me, the essence of a medicine man's life is to be humble, to have great patience, to be close to the Earth, to live as simply as possible, and to never stop learning."  -- Archie Fire Lame Deer, Lakota

 

The Medicine people focus on their Being, not their doing. After all, we are human beings not human doings. The Medicine people are very patient and consciously trying to live a life of humility. Medicine people are servant leaders. Their main purpose is to serve the needs of others. By this service attitude, they become the leaders people listen to and the leaders the people want to follow. The Medicine people say everyone is their teacher. We should try to live this way ourselves; humble, patient, honoring the Earth and listening to our teachers.

 

Grandfather, today, let me know all people are my teachers and I am the student. 

Copyright: Coyhis Publishing found in the book, Meditations with Native American Elders: Any republishing of part or all of their contents is prohibited.

 

Teaching humility can only be done by example. Teaching patience is to be patient. I am a student. ~Lee Standing Bear Moore


 

HISTORY
 

Official Positions within the Mohawk Nation
by Doug George-Kanentiio

As most people know the Mohawk Nation Council is a democratically based governing entity established over 800 years ago and is the founding member of the Six Nations Iroquois Confederacy-the Rotinosionni (in Mohawk) or the Haudenosaunee (from the Seneca dialect of Iroquois. The Council itself was created when Skennenrahowi met the Mohawks at Kahon:ios (Cohoes Falls) and convinced them to abandon their former status as a violent people and adopt the principles of the Kaiienerakowa, the Great Law of Peace.  
READ MORE...

 


 

HISTORY & CULTURE

 

Maps Of American Indian Tribes You've Never Seen Before

 

continental U.S. map like this, depicting more than 600 tribes — many now forgotten and lost to history. Now, the 34-year-old designs and sells maps as large as 3 by 4 feet with the names of tribes hovering over land they once occupied.

 

"I think a lot of people get blown away by, 'Wow, there were a lot of tribes, and they covered the whole country!' You know, this is Indian land," says Carapella, who calls himself a "mixed-blood Cherokee" and lives in a ranch house within the jurisdiction of the Cherokee Nation.

 

For more than a decade, he consulted history books and library archives, called up tribal members and visited reservations as part of research for his map project, which began as pencil-marked poster boards on his bedroom wall. So far, he has designed maps of the continental U.S., Canada and Mexico. A map of Alaska is currently in the works.  

 

BUY A BEAUTIFUL WALL MAP NOW! 



MANATAKA NEWS

 

Please help Manataka today. 

Give a donation or send your 2014 dues.

http://www.manataka.org/page201.html

 

MAIC needs your support now

Help be a part of building the Sacred Grounds at Manataka 

 

Please help Manataka Now!  Over the past 20 years, we seldom asked for help.  We need it now.

 


 

HISTORY

 

The Kiowa Calendar

Silver Horn Records
This online exhibition and teacher resource features the calendar drawings of Kiowa artist and calendar-keeper Silver Horn. The images depict key events in the history of the Kiowa people between 1828 and the winter of 1939-40. The descriptions were prepared by Candace Greene, ethnologist at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington D.C.

 

In the traditional Kiowa calendar, each year is represented by two images – one for the summer and one for the winter. The events depicted are agreed upon by tribal elders and drawn and maintained by designated tribal calendar-keepers, like Silver Horn. The calendar records were originally kept on hides or cloth, but eventually were copied into ledgers.

 

Silver Horn was born in 1860 (“The Summer That Bird Appearing was Killed,” according to his calendar). Both his father and older brother also were calendar-keepers for the tribe. He was a prolific artist, and created hundreds of drawings representing Kiowa history and tradition before his death in 1940.  READ MORE...

 

 


MEMBER NEWS

Volunteer Counseling Positions Open: 

Are you a minister, psychologist, teacher or counselor?  Elder Robert Gray Hawk Coke announces that more professional volunteer counselors are needed for the Manataka's free online Counseling program helping hundreds of people with emotional, spiritual, family, marital and other issues -- anonymously and free!. There are education, professional experience and licensure requirements. http://www.manataka.org/Counseling.html Email:  counseling@manataka.org

 

Manataka Sacred Grounds project:  

Planning is in full-swing to convert vacant lots on the east side of Manataka (Hot Springs) Mountain into memorial gardens.  Everyone is excited!  http://www.manataka.org/page1392.html


Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
 
Please rescind the so-called "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" regulation.

Turning most poultry inspection over to poultry companies so that they can police themselves is no way to address the rampant food- and workplace-safety problems plaguing this industry.

The proposed rule would decrease the number of USDA inspectors in poultry plants while increasing line speeds by up to 175 birds per minute,
or three birds per second. In order to compensate for missed fecal contamination, the proposed rule would permit companies to use more anti-microbial chemicals to clean the poultry carcasses.

Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. Working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America. This rule will worsen those conditions.

I urge you to withdraw the "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" rule.
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf
Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
 
Please rescind the so-called "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" regulation.

Turning most poultry inspection over to poultry companies so that they can police themselves is no way to address the rampant food- and workplace-safety problems plaguing this industry.

The proposed rule would decrease the number of USDA inspectors in poultry plants while increasing line speeds by up to 175 birds per minute,
or three birds per second. In order to compensate for missed fecal contamination, the proposed rule would permit companies to use more anti-microbial chemicals to clean the poultry carcasses.

Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. Working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America. This rule will worsen those conditions.

I urge you to withdraw the "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" rule.
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf
Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
 
Please rescind the so-called "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" regulation.

Turning most poultry inspection over to poultry companies so that they can police themselves is no way to address the rampant food- and workplace-safety problems plaguing this industry.

The proposed rule would decrease the number of USDA inspectors in poultry plants while increasing line speeds by up to 175 birds per minute,
or three birds per second. In order to compensate for missed fecal contamination, the proposed rule would permit companies to use more anti-microbial chemicals to clean the poultry carcasses.

Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. Working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America. This rule will worsen those conditions.

I urge you to withdraw the "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" rule.
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf
Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
 
Please rescind the so-called "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" regulation.

Turning most poultry inspection over to poultry companies so that they can police themselves is no way to address the rampant food- and workplace-safety problems plaguing this industry.

The proposed rule would decrease the number of USDA inspectors in poultry plants while increasing line speeds by up to 175 birds per minute,
or three birds per second. In order to compensate for missed fecal contamination, the proposed rule would permit companies to use more anti-microbial chemicals to clean the poultry carcasses.

Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. Working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America. This rule will worsen those conditions.

I urge you to withdraw the "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" rule.
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf
Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf

 

Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf
Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf
Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf
Ask the USDA to Rescind Its ‘Filthy Chicken Rule’
Ask the USDA to Rescind Its ‘Filthy Chicken Rule’
Ask the USDA to Rescind Its ‘Filthy Chicken Rule’
Ask the USDA to Rescind Its ‘Filthy Chicken Rule’

GOOD STUFF GRAB BAG

 

 

Manataka's YOUTH Books

 

A Basic Native/Iroquois Reading List

 

Tribal Flags -- 20 New Flags - Find Yours Now


 

ELDERS SPEAK

 

"What could be greater than to be Wakan-Tanka's mind, eyes, ears, nose, mouth, arms, hands, legs, and feet here on Earth?"  -- Fools Crow, Lakota

 

In order for the Creator to do His work on this earth, He needs the human being to do it. How He guides us is through our eyes, ears, hands, nose, mouth, arms legs and feet. We are instruments of the Creator. We are His keepers of the Earth. We are the keepers of our brothers. We are to teach His children. We are to respect the things He has made. We are to take care of ourselves and treat our bodies and our minds with respect. We are to do respectful things. We are to walk the Sacred Path. We should have good thoughts. We should do only things that we think the Creator would have us do. What an honor to be a human being. What an honor that He would talk to us and guide us to perform His wonders.

 

Oh Great Spirit, let me appreciate the role you have given me. Let my sense be sharp to hear Your voice. Keep my mind clean so I can do the things You would have me do.

 

Copyright: Coyhis Publishing found in the book, Meditations with Native American Elders: Any republishing of part or all of their contents is prohibited.

 

Being Wakan (sacred) is difficult in modern society that is full of confusion and distraction.  Inside the soul of every human  dwells Wakan Tanka (Creator of All Things) and this makes us able to do the great work of Love.  ~Lee Standing Bear Moore

 


 

MEMBER NEWS

 

Osiyo, and Greetings to All,

 

My name is Renee Lewis and I am an enrolled Cherokee with Manataka.  I was raised on Lonsdale Cut-Off road, near Hot Springs, Arkansas.  I am a Registered Nurse.  My father, Richard Lewis owns Bald Eagle Mountain Ballpark near the sacred Gulpha Gorge where Manataka held Gatherings for a few years, and my sister Crystal Harvey has been a contributing writer to the Smoke Signal for years.

 

Since I received the honor of a scholarship from the Elders of the Manataka American Indian Council to attend the Institute of BioEnergetic Medicine College, I wanted to let folks know how things are going as I’m sure there is an interest.  I know possibly there are others who may be thinking about attending the college.  We are taking a one month break this summer before starting classes again in August.  So I have time to set aside and update everyone on my experiences.  I work a full time job and then attend classes one weekend per month, I stay pretty busy.  On the weekends we are not attending class, we are studying.  The good thing about IBEM is you can attend remotely if you can’t make it to classes here in Denver, Colorado.   READ MORE..

 


 

ADVERTISING MESSAGES

 

 

New! American Indian Flags

 

Take Pride in Your Tribe -- Fly It High!

See 147 Authentic Tribal Flags

 

 


 

"You must speak straight so that your words may go as sunlight into our hearts."  -- Cochise "Like Ironweed" Chiricahaua Apache

 

Come into my heart this morning. Allow me this day to live in the now. Help me to see all the beauty You have created in all things. Let me know myself. Today, as I make mistakes, let me see them as lessons. Guide me. When I see others make mistakes, let me honor them for where they are. Let me realize that they are Your children and only You, my Grandfather, knows what is really going on. When my lips move, let the words be Your words.

 

Oh Creator, Allow me to have the courage to speak Your truth.

 

Copyright: Coyhis Publishing found in the book, Meditations with Native American Elders: Any republishing of part or all of their contents is prohibited.

 

The sunlight of Manataka's truth will shine forever in the hearts of everyone who listens.  Having eyes to hear is important to this truth.  Having ears to see the truth is magnificent. ~Lee Standing Bear Moore

 


 

 

OPINION PAGES - LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

 

 

Dear Manataka: 

 

American Indian Spirituality is Big Business!

By Daniel Flores

 

I read Manataka's article Selling American Indian Spirituality is Big Business! a few years ago, and believe no spiritual path should be sold or traded for anything. In the past the apprentice had to go great ordeal and prove him/her worthy of receiving a tradition or wisdom.

 

I have to say that the elders that attended the gathering "some" might have had some good interest in sharing their wisdom and maybe get a little $$ but the reality is that they were "all" used by Mr. Adam Yellow Bird, Drunvalo and their organizing team. 


 

READ MORE LETTERS TO THE EDITOR - SEPTEMBER 2014

 


 

POLITICS

 

Decolonization of Puerto Rico
 
Statement by Professor Francis A. Boyle Before the United Nations Special Committee on Decolonization on Behalf of the National Sovereign State of Borinken 

In 1492, Columbus illegally invaded the indigenous Kingdoms of America and proceeded to exterminate the indigenous peoples living there including the Tainos in Puerto Rico starting in 1493. The story is told in graphic detail by Professor Howard Zinn in the first chapter of his classic book The People's History of the United States.


So in the interest of time I am not going to recount here that sordid history of serial aggressions and genocides perpetrated by Columbus and the other Conquistadors upon the Indigenous Peoples and Kingdoms of America at the behest of and as agents for Spain and Portugal.   Certainly Puerto Rico was not resnullius -- the land of no people. The Tainos lived there in a political community organized into their own Kingdom. Therefore, the supposed European doctrine of “discovery" did not justify Spain’s genocidal invasion, conquest, and occupation of Puerto Rico and the Tainos. Moreover, the Borgia Pope Alexander VI had no right to attempt to steal Puerto Rico from the Tainos and give it to Spain by means of his so-called Inter Caetera “Bull,” which is nevertheless appropriately called “Bull” in English. The invasion, conquest, and occupation of Puerto Rico and the Tainos by Spain grossly violated the prevailing customary international law rule at that time known as the Just War Doctrine that was legally binding upon Spain. READ MORE...


 

NATIVE AMERICAN EVENTS - Non-Powwow

 

*******************************************************************************************

August 29 - September 1

Labor Day Weekend Open House

Crazy Horse Memorial Museum

Free admission* to residents of South Dakota, Montana, North Dakota, Nebraska & Wyoming. American Indian artists featured throughout Visitor Complex.

http://crazyhorsememorial.org/special-events/

(605) 673-4681

12151 Avenue of the Chiefs Crazy Horse, SD 57730 United States