SMOKE SIGNAL NEWS

AUGUST 2014

 

 

Friendship Day

August 03

International Forgiveness Day

August 03

Senior Citizens Day

August 21

 


 

ELDERS SPEAK

 

"Humility is probably the most difficult virtue to realize."  -- Thomas Yellowtail, Crow

 

Two definitions of humility are; one, being aware of one's own defects of character, and two, giving credit where credit is due. This means if you do something and are successful because God gave you certain talents, give credit to God when someone tells you how well you did; this is being humble. If you are successful at something, but had help from friends, spouse, neighbors, give credit to those who helped you; this is being humble. If you have done a task and you alone accomplished it, give credit to yourself; this is being humble. Say the truth and give credit where credit is due.

 

Grandfather, let me walk a truthful road today.

 

Copyright: Coyhis Publishing found in the book, Meditations with Native American Elders: Any republishing of part or all of their contents is prohibited.

 

At Manataka we teach the height of a person's stature is measured by ones humility -- being humble (Nu tlv quo dv na).  This word in English comes from the Latin word 'humas' meaning the Earth Mother.  This word in the Tsalagi language means to be lowly like the Earth Mother and is high praise. ~Lee Standing Bear Moore 

 


 

HOLIDAY FEATURE

 

International Forgiveness Day

August 03, 2014

 

Forgiveness from Seven Perspectives

American Indian Spirituality     Buddhism     Christianity    Hinduism      Islam     Judaism     Creator of All Things

 

Forgiveness in the World's Spiritual Traditions

by Ann Kathleen Bradley

 

The world's major spiritual traditions have long taught the value of forgiveness as a tool for freeing ourselves and others from the tyranny of past judgments and perceptions -- or misperceptions. The traditions may offer different rationales for why we should forgive, and different ways to go about it, but the ultimate goal is strikingly similar.   READ MORE...

 


Manataka Offering Edible Insects!

 

The Manataka American Indian Council has teamed up with World Entomophagy, Inc. to bring you fine quality, eco-friendly, safe and wonderfully tasting edible insects that have been processed for ready-to-use recipes.  

 

Manataka believes that eating insects (entomophagy) is very healthy and one day will become a tremendously beneficial food source for the United States and help alleviate the global food crisis.  Unlike beef, chicken and other livestock that consumes over one-third of the food crops grown in the U.S., insects can be raised on a small fraction of feed.  Livestock also creates 20% of polluting greenhouse gases such as methane and ammonia that are 23 times more powerful than carbon dioxide. The total population of insects worldwide do not produce any significant harmful gases.  Beef and other grazing livestock also consume a great deal of agricultural land, labor and resources.  With insects there are no veterinary bills, no problem with manure disposal, and a lot less cost to process and package.

 

According to Aletheia Price in our article, Eating Bugs!!, "Raising insects is environmentally friendly. They require minimal space per pound of protein produced, have a better feed to meat ratio than any other animal you can raise, and are very low on the food chain. They are healthy, tasty, and have been utilized for the entire history of mankind (after all, it is easier to catch a grub than a mammoth)."

 

There are over 1,400 recorded species of edible insects that can be raised in eco-clean environments.  Compared to beef, lamb, pork, birds and fish, insects contain a lot more protein and less fat and calories.  Yet, insects are chalked full of many vitamins and minerals.  Eating insects may seem yucky, but you may not realize that every person inadvertently consumes over a pound of insects in their lifetime found in processed foods.


Insects are tasty. Really!  


"If there is a shadow of a doubt someplace, that will cause a weakness."  -- Wallace Black Elk, Lakota


 

HEALTH WATCH

 

Mother Earth − A Missing Link in Women’s Health

(One of a series of articles on Earthing)

By Martin Zucker

 

Despite all the health care that government, insurance plans, and doctors can provide, the fact is that the health of our society stinks. Among the common reasons are poor nutrition, a toxic environment, daily stress, and not enough physical activity.

 

For many women, there are added challenges such as hormonal imbalances, motherhood, and care giving.  The reality is that women suffer from many illnesses, such as auto-immune conditions, at higher rates than men.

One totally overlooked reason – a missing link − could be the disconnect with Mother Earth’s natural and nurturing electric energy that radiates from the ground. Throughout virtually all of history, humans have lived in almost constant physical contact with the ground.  We were connected.  Nowadays, we rarely walk outside barefoot, and we no longer sleep on the ground.  We are disconnected. 

 

New research strongly suggests that we may all be suffering as a result. Chronic inflammation, regarded as a major cause or component of most common illnesses, may be one such consequence of the disconnect.

 

 

 

Earthing, or grounding as it is often called, offers a simple and natural remedy for the disconnect by restoring a natural electrical state in the body.  Keep in mind that your organs, and, in fact, all the trillions of cells in your body, operate electrically, and throughout time they were synchronized and energized by the subtle rhythms of the Earth’s electrodynamic surface.

 

As strange as it sounds, the very ground beneath your feet may likely be the single-most powerful medicine on the planet, capable of significantly reducing pain and inflammation, improving sleep and energy, and speeding recovery from injuries and exhaustion.  Mother Earth, it turns out, provides all living things – you, me, the animal and plant kingdoms – with a surprising and overlooked source of sustenance: a virtually limitless supply of free electrons that give the ground we walk on its natural, subtle, and negative electrical charge. 

 

Think of this energy perhaps as vitamin G − G for ground. You can’t see it but some people can feel it as a warm, tingling, and pleasant sensation when out walking barefoot along the water’s edge at the beach or on a stretch of dew-moistened grass.  
 

For the last fifteen years, Earthing has been studied scientifically and the effects observed. Common benefits include the following:

 


 

ELDERS SPEAK

 

Sleeping Grandfather Mountain

"In the Beginning were the Instructions. The Instruction was to live in a good way and be respectful to everybody and everything."  -- Vickie Downey, Tewa/Tesuque Pueblo

A long time ago, in the beginning, the Creator gave to all people and to all things the Wisdom and the knowledge of how to live in harmony. Some tribes call these teachings the original Instructions, the original teachings, or the Great Laws. All of Nature still lives and survives according to these teachings. In modern times, human beings are searching for the Instructions. Many churches claim they have these Instructions. Where are these teachings? The Instructions are written in our hearts.

Great Spirit, today, whisper to me the secrets of the original Instructions.

Copyright: Coyhis Publishing found in the book, Meditations with Native American Elders: Any republishing of part or all of their contents is prohibited.

 

The Original Instructions were known long before the Great Forgetting over 10,000 years ago. We are fortunate that so many of those Instructions survived to this day.  We are convinced that is the reason why our culture and people have survived for so long.  Yes, we teach the Original Instruction at Manataka.  ~Lee Standing Bear Moore 

 


 

FEATURE

 

Have You Heard of The Great Forgetting? It Happened 10,000 Years Ago and Completely Affects Your Life

Republished from deep-ecology-hub.com
 

 

The Great Forgetting refers to the wealth of knowledge that our culture lost when we adopted our new civilized lifestyle. The knowledge that allowed indigenous cultures to survive, the knowledge that we had once also been tribal and the understanding that we were but one mere culture of thousands. All of this disappeared in a few short generations.

The Great Forgetting accounts for an enormous cultural collapse as once tribal people found themselves in a new and strange mass centralized society. New beliefs, new ways of life rushed into this cultural vacuum to fill the void. But without being tested by natural selection over thousands of years this new culture was evolutionarily unstable.

It is only recently that the Great Forgetting has been exposed. Understanding it holds the key to making sense of our destructive culture. And remembering what it is that was forgotten holds the key to our future.

How The Great Forgetting Took Place
It began around 10,000 years ago when one culture in the Near East adopted a new way of life that humans had not tried before.

They began to practice an intensive form of agriculture which enabled them to live in a settled location.

They developed large food surpluses which led to a population and geographic explosion. What began as farming communes eventually turned into villages, then into towns, and then kingdoms. Civilization began.

But it was a long time before anybody began to write down history, several thousand years later in fact. What happened in between was that the people of this culture forgot what had happened. They forgot that they once were hunter gatherers and foragers who lived a nomadic lifestyle. They assumed that mankind arrived on the planet at the same time as civilization. They assumed that civilization and settled agriculture was the natural state of mankind, as natural as living in a herd and grazing is to buffalo. 
READ MORE...
 

 


 

ENVIRONMENT 

 

 

Arnold Schwarzenegger Double Dealing Against Indigenous People

 

Palm oil is in nearly half of our packaged foods and cosmetics, not because it’s good for us, but because it’s cheap to slash forests and kick indigenous communities off their land in order to grow palm plantations. Last month, the first mass-media program to highlight the rain forest destruction driven by palm oil, Years of Living Dangerously, premiered on Showtime -- and it’s a great show. 

 

But behind the scenes, one of the show’s star producers -- former Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger -- is profiting from forest destruction. Schwarzenegger is part-owner and a major client of Dimensional Fund Advisors, a money manager with nearly a billion dollars in logging and palm oil companies -- the very same ones that are burning and bulldozing the forests of Southeast Asia, threatening rural communities and some of the last wild populations of orangutans, rhinos and tigers.   READ MORE...
 


 

 

Oceans Acidifying 50 Times Faster Than Historical Rate

 

Among other life-or-death subjects, the groundbreaking new National Climate Assessment includes an analysis of our acidifying oceans -- an inclusion the Center pushed for back in 2011. Over the past 250 years, the acidity of surface ocean waters has increased by 30 percent as the seas absorb the carbon dioxide we pump into the atmosphere -- and the current observed rate of change is about 50 times faster than the known historical rate.

By the end of this century the surface waters of the ocean could be as much as 150 percent more acidic, resulting in levels "that the oceans have not experienced for more than 20 million years and effectively transforming marine life as we know it." In fact, the study concedes, such huge changes in ocean acidity probably haven't been experienced on the planet for the past 100 million years; it's unclear whether or how ocean life could adapt to such rapid acidification.

Acidification puts shelled marine species -- including pteropods, oysters, clams, sea urchins, corals and calcareous plankton -- at risk, and that means the entire ocean food web may also be at risk. Right now more than 1 billion people depend on the ocean for their food.

Read more, and check out some good graphics, in the Assessment itself.

 


 

ENVIRONMENT

 

 

Two multinational chemical companies, Dow Chemical and  Syngenta, have asked the Environmental Protection Agency to allow them to ramp up the use of two pesticides that could have deadly consequences for bees.
 

The EPA is inviting the public to comment on this disastrous plan until May 27 -- which means we must mobilize immediately to stop the chemical giants in their tracks!
 

Honeybees, native bees and other pollinators are vital to maintaining our food supply. Fruits and vegetables like apples, blueberries, strawberries, carrots and broccoli as well as almonds and coffee all rely on pollination from bees.   READ MORE...
 


 

ANIMAL RIGHTS

 

CHEROKEE BEAR ZOO CAN'T STOP ELDERS' LAWSUIT, COURT RULES

Suffering Bears Cruelly Held in Concrete Pits Will Have Their Day in Court

 

Cherokee, N.C. — Two elders of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians scored a legal victory this week when the U.S. District Court for the Western District of North CarolinaBryson City Division denied a motion by the Cherokee Bear Zoo (CBZ) and its owners to dismiss the elders' lawsuit, which was filed on behalf of grizzly bears suffering in virtually barren concrete pits at CBZ.

 

"The bears languishing in atrocious living conditions at Cherokee Bear Zoo have won this round in the courts," says Cheryl Ward, a consultant in the elders' efforts. "The elders now have a chance to show the court that the bears suffer every day at this despicable so-called 'zoo' and will continue to do so until they get moved to a sanctuary."

Although all the bears at CBZ suffer, an approximately 3-month-old cub being used for photo ops, who endlessly paces while growling and crying for attention, angrily stomping her hind legs, and urinating on herself, appears to be particularly stressed and should still be with her mother.

 

The lawsuit claims that CBZ is violating the Endangered Species Act's prohibition against harming protected animals. The two elders, Peggy Hill and Amy Walker, are suing CBZ for continuing to harass, wound, and imprison the grizzly bears, who are forced to live in concrete pits. The lawsuit states that the owners of CBZ "deny the bears opportunities to forage, hibernate, nest, and satisfy their most basic needs. Instead, they are forced to beg for food from tourists."

 

For more information, please visit CoalitionForCherokeeBears.com.


 

 

FEATURE

 

Bring Down the Racist Massachusetts Flag!

 

On a white field is a blue shield emblazoned with the image of a Native American, Massachusetts. He holds a bow in one hand and an arrow in the other. The arrow is pointing downward representing peace. The white star represents Massachusetts as one of the original thirteen states. Around the shield is a blue ribbon with the motto: " By the Sword We Seek Peace, but Peace Only Under Liberty". Above the shield is a arm and sword, representing the first part of the motto.

 

  

Sunshine of the Americas Foundation Sues the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in Federal Court

 

Sword of Myles Standish hacks away at the head of American Indians!


In
December of 2011, a law suit against the Commonwealth of Massachusetts was filed by Reverend Danny De Gug, founder of the Cambridge Sunshine Foundation also known as the Sunshine of the Americas Foundation demands that Massachusetts change it state flag first adopted in 1901.  The flag was used unofficially since the American Revolution as the ensign of the Massachusetts State Navy.  In 1971, an earlier design of a simple pine tree was replaced by the current design.   READ MORE...

 


 

FEATURE

 

Navajo Nation Council approves $554 million agreement to end litigation against the United States over historical mismanagement of trust funds
 

 

(Window Rock, AZ)  The Navajo Nation Council voted 13 - 3 to approve Legislation No. 0131 - 14,  approving a monumental agreement that will award the Navajo Nation a total of $554 million from the United States and brings an end to the Navajo Nation’s lawsuit against the United States over historical mismanagement of trust fund assets.

 

The Navajo Nation and U.S. Departments of Justice, Interior, and Treasury reached an agreement in principle over the Navajo Nation’s claims that the United States had breached its fiduciary obligations arising under treaties, executive orders, federal statutes and regulations, and contractual documents by failing to manage, invest and account for tribal trust funds and resources under the custody and control of the United States in a manner that would maximize the financial return from those assets.

 

The $554 million landmark agreement is the largest single resolution in the more than 100 cases filed against the United States by American Indian tribes by more than $170 million.  The agreement secures a successful resolution to the historical mismanagement of the Navajo Nation’s trust assets by the United States, with claims dating as early as 1946. Under the terms of the agreement, the Navajo Nation will dismiss its pending lawsuit which was filed on December 29, 2006 in the United States Court of Federal Claims. 

 

"The agreement marks the successful conclusion of years of hard fought litigation and secures a very substantial award for the Navajo Nation,” said Naabik’iyátí’ Committee Trust Mismanagement Litigation Task Force chair.

 


 

BOOK REVIEW

 

CP 605- CHEROKEE ASTROLOGY - SACRED CALENDAR By Raven Hail

Written by a tribal elder, "The Cherokee Sacred Calendar" provides an easy-to-use format for determining what signs and numbers rule the day of your birth and what influence they have on your destiny. Explains the ancient astrological system sacred to the Cherokee and how to use it in the modern world.  Provides easy-to-use format for determining what signs and numbers rule the day of your birth and what influence they have on your destiny. Includes a traditional Cherokee ephemeris through 2015. 

 

An essential aspect of Cherokee religion is the belief that everything on Earth is the reflection of a star. This includes not only people and animals but also trees, rivers, stones, and mountains--all sentient beings to the Cherokee. Astrology has always played a strong role in the Cherokee tradition because of this belief, but unlike our Western system of astrology, Cherokee astrology is based on a 260-day Venus calendar, which includes 20 individual day signs and 13 numbers. It was the task of the Cherokee daykeeper to coordinate this calendar with those of the Sun and the Moon to determine the most auspicious times for ceremonies as well as to understand the star wisdom carried back to Earth by each newborn child.

 

The day sign of a child explains his or her strengths and weaknesses; the number explains the individual’s role in the great cosmic scheme.  Raven Hail, an elder of the Cherokee nation, provides insightful descriptions for each of the twenty signs that identify characteristics of those born under a particular day sign and gives the meanings of the thirteen numbers that determine the significance of that sign in the larger scheme of life. The author has translated the traditional Cherokee ephemeris into an easy-to-use format that allows readers to quickly determine which sign rules the day of their birth and which number has influence over it. - Soft Cover, 152pp.  October 1999.  ISBN 9781591430872  $ 19.95 + s/h

READ MORE ABOUT RAVEN HAIL AND HER BOOKS...


Field to Fork: Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley - See more at: http://indiangiver.firstnations.org/nl140506-01/#sthash.DkuNMPxg.dpuf
Field to Fork: Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley - See more at: http://indiangiver.firstnations.org/nl140506-01/#sthash.DkuNMPxg.dpuf
Field to Fork: Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley - See more at: http://indiangiver.firstnations.org/nl140506-01/#sthash.DkuNMPxg.dpuf
Field to Fork: Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley - See more at: http://indiangiver.firstnations.org/nl140506-01/#sthash.DkuNMPxg.dpuf
The Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley is located on the Big Pine Indian Reservation in California, at the foot of the Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains. The tribe’s early ancestors utilized the land and water to create irrigated areas that produced the tribe’s main food source. However, at the turn of the twentieth century, the city of Los Angeles purchased most of the land and water rights in the Owens Valley and transferred them to the Los Angeles basin, thus severing the tribe’s connection with the land and water and interfering with its ability to feed its own people.

Today, the Big Pine Reservation is considered a “food desert” because of the lack of access to healthy and affordable food. In 2010, the tribe established the Sustainable Food System Development Project to transform its food desert into a more robust, sustainable food system by establishing a permaculture garden.

In 2013, First Nations awarded the Big Pine Paiute Tribe $37,500 through the Native Agriculture and Food Sovereignty Initiative (NAFSI) to expand the permaculture garden to include a demonstration site, a fruit orchard, a seed bank, and a weekly farmers’ market. This grant, underwritten by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, has allowed the tribe to develop an innovative field-to-fork model that will sustain the community for generations to come.

This grant allowed the tribe to expand their small permaculture garden into a larger educational community garden that teaches tribal members how to plant, grow and harvest healthy, organic heirloom fruits and vegetables as well as Native plants and medicine. The tribe used the expanded permaculture garden as a demonstration site to conduct several classes and workshops, including a three-day intensive permaculture course, food policy/sovereignty classes, youth mentoring sessions, and numerous gardening workshops.

The gardening workshops, in particular, have been very popular among tribal members. At these workshops, tribal members learn about composting, caring for plants and respecting ecosystems. Many workshop participants used these lessons to create their own personal home gardens. These workshops encouraged tribal members to start their own gardens while simultaneously attending to the community garden. As a result of these hands-on workshops, tribal members helped plant, grow and harvest more than 100 pounds of squash, cucumbers, tomatoes, green beans and bell peppers that were eventually donated to the tribal grocery store.

Many tribal members also volunteered at the expanded permaculture garden site outside of these workshops. For example, several volunteers helped plant 50 perennial fruit trees. The trees did not yield any fruit this season. However, once these trees mature, they have the potential to yield hundreds of pounds of fruit. These trees will produce healthy, fresh fruit for generations. The tribe speculates that eventually they will need to hire more workers to maintain the fruit orchard and the ever-expanding permaculture garden.

The tribe determined which fruits and vegetables to plant in the permaculture garden by conducting a community survey. This survey also helped the tribe determine which seeds to collect and store for the seed bank. The purpose of the seed bank is to gather the seeds of plants originally grown in the region and preserve them for future generations. The seed bank is a continuing process that will grow as the tribe becomes more and more aware of its needs and learns proper seed-saving techniques.

A portion of this grant was also used to host weekly farmers’ markets that helped farmers and workshop participants sell their fruits and vegetables. These farmers markets are intended to help growers earn extra money and provide tribal members with a healthy alternative to processed foods.

The Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley developed the Sustainable Food System Development Project to improve the physical health and well-being of their people and to preserve their tribal community for generations to come. The success of this innovative field-to-fork model reiterates that tribes have the potential to strengthen and improve their own communities.

By Sarah Hernandez, First Nations Program Coordinator

- See more at: http://indiangiver.firstnations.org/nl140506-01/#sthash.DkuNMPxg.dpuf
The Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley is located on the Big Pine Indian Reservation in California, at the foot of the Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains. The tribe’s early ancestors utilized the land and water to create irrigated areas that produced the tribe’s main food source. However, at the turn of the twentieth century, the city of Los Angeles purchased most of the land and water rights in the Owens Valley and transferred them to the Los Angeles basin, thus severing the tribe’s connection with the land and water and interfering with its ability to feed its own people.

Today, the Big Pine Reservation is considered a “food desert” because of the lack of access to healthy and affordable food. In 2010, the tribe established the Sustainable Food System Development Project to transform its food desert into a more robust, sustainable food system by establishing a permaculture garden.

In 2013, First Nations awarded the Big Pine Paiute Tribe $37,500 through the Native Agriculture and Food Sovereignty Initiative (NAFSI) to expand the permaculture garden to include a demonstration site, a fruit orchard, a seed bank, and a weekly farmers’ market. This grant, underwritten by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, has allowed the tribe to develop an innovative field-to-fork model that will sustain the community for generations to come.

This grant allowed the tribe to expand their small permaculture garden into a larger educational community garden that teaches tribal members how to plant, grow and harvest healthy, organic heirloom fruits and vegetables as well as Native plants and medicine. The tribe used the expanded permaculture garden as a demonstration site to conduct several classes and workshops, including a three-day intensive permaculture course, food policy/sovereignty classes, youth mentoring sessions, and numerous gardening workshops.

The gardening workshops, in particular, have been very popular among tribal members. At these workshops, tribal members learn about composting, caring for plants and respecting ecosystems. Many workshop participants used these lessons to create their own personal home gardens. These workshops encouraged tribal members to start their own gardens while simultaneously attending to the community garden. As a result of these hands-on workshops, tribal members helped plant, grow and harvest more than 100 pounds of squash, cucumbers, tomatoes, green beans and bell peppers that were eventually donated to the tribal grocery store.

Many tribal members also volunteered at the expanded permaculture garden site outside of these workshops. For example, several volunteers helped plant 50 perennial fruit trees. The trees did not yield any fruit this season. However, once these trees mature, they have the potential to yield hundreds of pounds of fruit. These trees will produce healthy, fresh fruit for generations. The tribe speculates that eventually they will need to hire more workers to maintain the fruit orchard and the ever-expanding permaculture garden.

The tribe determined which fruits and vegetables to plant in the permaculture garden by conducting a community survey. This survey also helped the tribe determine which seeds to collect and store for the seed bank. The purpose of the seed bank is to gather the seeds of plants originally grown in the region and preserve them for future generations. The seed bank is a continuing process that will grow as the tribe becomes more and more aware of its needs and learns proper seed-saving techniques.

A portion of this grant was also used to host weekly farmers’ markets that helped farmers and workshop participants sell their fruits and vegetables. These farmers markets are intended to help growers earn extra money and provide tribal members with a healthy alternative to processed foods.

The Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley developed the Sustainable Food System Development Project to improve the physical health and well-being of their people and to preserve their tribal community for generations to come. The success of this innovative field-to-fork model reiterates that tribes have the potential to strengthen and improve their own communities.

By Sarah Hernandez, First Nations Program Coordinator

- See more at: http://indiangiver.firstnations.org/nl140506-01/#sthash.DkuNMPxg.dpuf
The Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley is located on the Big Pine Indian Reservation in California, at the foot of the Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains. The tribe’s early ancestors utilized the land and water to create irrigated areas that produced the tribe’s main food source. However, at the turn of the twentieth century, the city of Los Angeles purchased most of the land and water rights in the Owens Valley and transferred them to the Los Angeles basin, thus severing the tribe’s connection with the land and water and interfering with its ability to feed its own people.

Today, the Big Pine Reservation is considered a “food desert” because of the lack of access to healthy and affordable food. In 2010, the tribe established the Sustainable Food System Development Project to transform its food desert into a more robust, sustainable food system by establishing a permaculture garden.

In 2013, First Nations awarded the Big Pine Paiute Tribe $37,500 through the Native Agriculture and Food Sovereignty Initiative (NAFSI) to expand the permaculture garden to include a demonstration site, a fruit orchard, a seed bank, and a weekly farmers’ market. This grant, underwritten by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, has allowed the tribe to develop an innovative field-to-fork model that will sustain the community for generations to come.

This grant allowed the tribe to expand their small permaculture garden into a larger educational community garden that teaches tribal members how to plant, grow and harvest healthy, organic heirloom fruits and vegetables as well as Native plants and medicine. The tribe used the expanded permaculture garden as a demonstration site to conduct several classes and workshops, including a three-day intensive permaculture course, food policy/sovereignty classes, youth mentoring sessions, and numerous gardening workshops.

The gardening workshops, in particular, have been very popular among tribal members. At these workshops, tribal members learn about composting, caring for plants and respecting ecosystems. Many workshop participants used these lessons to create their own personal home gardens. These workshops encouraged tribal members to start their own gardens while simultaneously attending to the community garden. As a result of these hands-on workshops, tribal members helped plant, grow and harvest more than 100 pounds of squash, cucumbers, tomatoes, green beans and bell peppers that were eventually donated to the tribal grocery store.

Many tribal members also volunteered at the expanded permaculture garden site outside of these workshops. For example, several volunteers helped plant 50 perennial fruit trees. The trees did not yield any fruit this season. However, once these trees mature, they have the potential to yield hundreds of pounds of fruit. These trees will produce healthy, fresh fruit for generations. The tribe speculates that eventually they will need to hire more workers to maintain the fruit orchard and the ever-expanding permaculture garden.

The tribe determined which fruits and vegetables to plant in the permaculture garden by conducting a community survey. This survey also helped the tribe determine which seeds to collect and store for the seed bank. The purpose of the seed bank is to gather the seeds of plants originally grown in the region and preserve them for future generations. The seed bank is a continuing process that will grow as the tribe becomes more and more aware of its needs and learns proper seed-saving techniques.

A portion of this grant was also used to host weekly farmers’ markets that helped farmers and workshop participants sell their fruits and vegetables. These farmers markets are intended to help growers earn extra money and provide tribal members with a healthy alternative to processed foods.

The Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley developed the Sustainable Food System Development Project to improve the physical health and well-being of their people and to preserve their tribal community for generations to come. The success of this innovative field-to-fork model reiterates that tribes have the potential to strengthen and improve their own communities.

By Sarah Hernandez, First Nations Program Coordinator

- See more at: http://indiangiver.firstnations.org/nl140506-01/#sthash.DkuNMPxg.dpuf
The Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley is located on the Big Pine Indian Reservation in California, at the foot of the Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains. The tribe’s early ancestors utilized the land and water to create irrigated areas that produced the tribe’s main food source. However, at the turn of the twentieth century, the city of Los Angeles purchased most of the land and water rights in the Owens Valley and transferred them to the Los Angeles basin, thus severing the tribe’s connection with the land and water and interfering with its ability to feed its own people.

Today, the Big Pine Reservation is considered a “food desert” because of the lack of access to healthy and affordable food. In 2010, the tribe established the Sustainable Food System Development Project to transform its food desert into a more robust, sustainable food system by establishing a permaculture garden.

In 2013, First Nations awarded the Big Pine Paiute Tribe $37,500 through the Native Agriculture and Food Sovereignty Initiative (NAFSI) to expand the permaculture garden to include a demonstration site, a fruit orchard, a seed bank, and a weekly farmers’ market. This grant, underwritten by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, has allowed the tribe to develop an innovative field-to-fork model that will sustain the community for generations to come.

This grant allowed the tribe to expand their small permaculture garden into a larger educational community garden that teaches tribal members how to plant, grow and harvest healthy, organic heirloom fruits and vegetables as well as Native plants and medicine. The tribe used the expanded permaculture garden as a demonstration site to conduct several classes and workshops, including a three-day intensive permaculture course, food policy/sovereignty classes, youth mentoring sessions, and numerous gardening workshops.

The gardening workshops, in particular, have been very popular among tribal members. At these workshops, tribal members learn about composting, caring for plants and respecting ecosystems. Many workshop participants used these lessons to create their own personal home gardens. These workshops encouraged tribal members to start their own gardens while simultaneously attending to the community garden. As a result of these hands-on workshops, tribal members helped plant, grow and harvest more than 100 pounds of squash, cucumbers, tomatoes, green beans and bell peppers that were eventually donated to the tribal grocery store.

Many tribal members also volunteered at the expanded permaculture garden site outside of these workshops. For example, several volunteers helped plant 50 perennial fruit trees. The trees did not yield any fruit this season. However, once these trees mature, they have the potential to yield hundreds of pounds of fruit. These trees will produce healthy, fresh fruit for generations. The tribe speculates that eventually they will need to hire more workers to maintain the fruit orchard and the ever-expanding permaculture garden.

The tribe determined which fruits and vegetables to plant in the permaculture garden by conducting a community survey. This survey also helped the tribe determine which seeds to collect and store for the seed bank. The purpose of the seed bank is to gather the seeds of plants originally grown in the region and preserve them for future generations. The seed bank is a continuing process that will grow as the tribe becomes more and more aware of its needs and learns proper seed-saving techniques.

A portion of this grant was also used to host weekly farmers’ markets that helped farmers and workshop participants sell their fruits and vegetables. These farmers markets are intended to help growers earn extra money and provide tribal members with a healthy alternative to processed foods.

The Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley developed the Sustainable Food System Development Project to improve the physical health and well-being of their people and to preserve their tribal community for generations to come. The success of this innovative field-to-fork model reiterates that tribes have the potential to strengthen and improve their own communities.

By Sarah Hernandez, First Nations Program Coordinator

- See more at: http://indiangiver.firstnations.org/nl140506-01/#sthash.DkuNMPxg.dpuf

 

ELDERS SPEAK...

 

"Wakan Tanka never stops creating." -- Archie Fire Lame Deer, Lakota

 

The Medicine Wheel teaches about change. It says that which is created will fall apart; that which is loose, will be used to create new. In other words, everything on Earth is participating in a constant change that is being directed by an order of laws and principles which were originated by the Great Spirit. We humans are equipped with natural change abilities. We have the ability to vision; we can use imagination and imagery; we can change belief, attitude, habits, and expectations. We need to know ourselves and we need to know how we work inside to enable us to change naturally.

 

Great Spirit, teach me to change in harmony.

Copyright: Coyhis Publishing found in the book, Meditations with Native American Elders: Any republishing of part or all of their contents is prohibited.

 

 At Manataka we teach principals of the Medicine Wheel that instructs us about sacred relationships and removing that which is unproductive, fallen away or in demise to clear the path for renewal and rebirth. ~Lee Standing Bear Moore


 

SPIRITUALITY
 

Our Winds Native American Ministry (USA) was founded in August of 1994, originally known as Gadohi Usquanigodi NASC, in Taos, New Mexico. Our ministry is based on the Cherokee egalitarian theology of inclusion, meaning all people are valued and welcome, and founded on the traditional principles and teachings of American Indian spiritual beliefs, practices, and culture as well as the Native American Christian context.


Founded by Grandfather Bill Running Wolf, M.Div, MSW and with the help and support of Grandfather Rolling Thunder, we continue to practice the spirit of Gadugi (community) through the sharing of regular Asi (Sweat Lodge Ceremony), Ganvnowa Ceremony (Prayer Circles), Utselaska (Crying for a Vision), Medicine Wheel Teachings, Cedar Blessing Ceremony and other forms of regular worship. Through this we assist community members in growing and evolving their relationship with our Creator and all others as human beings and spiritual beings in a good and healthy way.   READ MORE...

 


 

PROTESTS

 

Students May be Called Seminole Chieftains,

but Cannot Wear Eagle Feathers at High School Graduation

 

Seminole County, Oklahoma — High school seniors are starting their celebrations all across Indian country, but for some of those Native students, they are not allowed to walk across the stage with the honor of wearing an eagle feather.

 

At one high school, it is almost ironic, the students are called the Seminole Chieftaians, but they cannot wear eagle feathers at their own high school graduation ceremony.

 

In Seminole county, Oklahoma, at Seminole High School, the student body is 49 percent Native American according to a Public School Review online record.   And even though they Native students account for a large part of the student body, the Native seniors, were informed they were not allowed to put an eagle feather on their graduation caps.    READ MORE... http://www.publicschoolreview.com/school_ov/school_id/66602     

 


 

HISTORY & CULTURE

 

The Kickapoo Indians

Compiled and edited by Kathy Weiser/Legends of Kansas, updated May, 2014.

 

Kickapoo comes from their word "Kiwigapawa," means "he stands about" or "he moves about." The tribe of the central Algonquian group, formed a division with the Sac and Fox, with whom they had close ethnic and linguistic connections. The Kickapoo first appeared in history about 1667-70 when they were found by Allouez near the portage between the Fox and Wisconsin Rivers. The Kickapoo were associated with other more powerful tribes occupying the country watered by the Ohio, Wabash and Miami Rivers, in which they participated in a treaty made at Greenville in 1795 by General Wayne, and in those of 1803, at Fort Wayne and Vincennes, Indiana. By these and succeeding treaties, the tribe ceded all their lands on the Wabash, White and Vermilion Rivers.

 

They also ceded lands in the valley of the Illinois River, of which "the said Kickapoo tribe claim a large portion by descent from their ancestors, and the balance by conquest from the Illinois nation, and uninterrupted possession for more than half a century."

 

In consideration of these cessions, they were given a tract of land situated on, and south of, the Osage River in Missouri. The tribe were living on the Wabash River at the time this treaty was made, and removed to Missouri the following year.  READ MORE...

 



MANATAKA NEWS

 

Please help Manataka today. 

Give a donation or send your 2014 dues.

http://www.manataka.org/page201.html

 

MAIC needs your support now

Help be a part of building the Sacred Grounds at Manataka 

 

Please help Manataka Now!  Over the past 20 years, we seldom asked for help.  We need it now.

 


 

FEATURE

 

              

DNA Testing Proves Native American Genealogy To Be Among the Most Unique in the World

 

New evidence supports the single ancestral population theory... Land bridge idea debunked... American Indians' DNA proves distinct race...

 

The systematic destruction of the Native Americans, First Nations, Metis and Inuit people and their entire way of life was not only one of recorded history’s greatest tragedies, but, as with the slave trade, deeply spiritually wounding to all involved. The utter decimation of their culture is one of the most shameful aspects of our history, the extent of the damage still being down-played and denied entry into textbooks and history-lessons to this day. The inability of governments everywhere to come to grips with their dark past and allow the aboriginals who are native to this land – as well as the descendants of everyone else involved – the healing required to move forward is not only a denial of basic human rights, but a tell-tale sign of the type of current racism, economic neglect and mistreatment that would surely come to light were they to do so.   READ MORE...

 


MEMBER NEWS

Volunteer Counseling Positions Open: 

Are you a minister, psychologist, teacher or counselor?  Elder Robert Gray Hawk Coke announces that more professional volunteer counselors are needed for the Manataka's free online Counseling program helping hundreds of people with emotional, spiritual, family, marital and other issues -- anonymously and free!. There are education, professional experience and licensure requirements. http://www.manataka.org/Counseling.html Email:  counseling@manataka.org

 

Manataka Sacred Grounds project:  

Planning is in full-swing to convert vacant lots on the east side of Manataka (Hot Springs) Mountain into memorial gardens.  Everyone is excited!  http://www.manataka.org/page1392.html


Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
 
Please rescind the so-called "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" regulation.

Turning most poultry inspection over to poultry companies so that they can police themselves is no way to address the rampant food- and workplace-safety problems plaguing this industry.

The proposed rule would decrease the number of USDA inspectors in poultry plants while increasing line speeds by up to 175 birds per minute,
or three birds per second. In order to compensate for missed fecal contamination, the proposed rule would permit companies to use more anti-microbial chemicals to clean the poultry carcasses.

Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. Working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America. This rule will worsen those conditions.

I urge you to withdraw the "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" rule.
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf
Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
 
Please rescind the so-called "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" regulation.

Turning most poultry inspection over to poultry companies so that they can police themselves is no way to address the rampant food- and workplace-safety problems plaguing this industry.

The proposed rule would decrease the number of USDA inspectors in poultry plants while increasing line speeds by up to 175 birds per minute,
or three birds per second. In order to compensate for missed fecal contamination, the proposed rule would permit companies to use more anti-microbial chemicals to clean the poultry carcasses.

Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. Working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America. This rule will worsen those conditions.

I urge you to withdraw the "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" rule.
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf
Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
 
Please rescind the so-called "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" regulation.

Turning most poultry inspection over to poultry companies so that they can police themselves is no way to address the rampant food- and workplace-safety problems plaguing this industry.

The proposed rule would decrease the number of USDA inspectors in poultry plants while increasing line speeds by up to 175 birds per minute,
or three birds per second. In order to compensate for missed fecal contamination, the proposed rule would permit companies to use more anti-microbial chemicals to clean the poultry carcasses.

Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. Working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America. This rule will worsen those conditions.

I urge you to withdraw the "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" rule.
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf
Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
 
Please rescind the so-called "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" regulation.

Turning most poultry inspection over to poultry companies so that they can police themselves is no way to address the rampant food- and workplace-safety problems plaguing this industry.

The proposed rule would decrease the number of USDA inspectors in poultry plants while increasing line speeds by up to 175 birds per minute,
or three birds per second. In order to compensate for missed fecal contamination, the proposed rule would permit companies to use more anti-microbial chemicals to clean the poultry carcasses.

Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. Working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America. This rule will worsen those conditions.

I urge you to withdraw the "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" rule.
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf
Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf

 

Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf
Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf
Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf
Ask the USDA to Rescind Its ‘Filthy Chicken Rule’
Ask the USDA to Rescind Its ‘Filthy Chicken Rule’
Ask the USDA to Rescind Its ‘Filthy Chicken Rule’
Ask the USDA to Rescind Its ‘Filthy Chicken Rule’

GOOD STUFF GRAB BAG

 

 

Manataka's YOUTH Books

 

A Basic Native/Iroquois Reading List

 

Tribal Flags -- 20 New Flags - Find Yours Now


 

ELDERS SPEAK

 

"You have to have a lot of patience to hear those old people talk, because when they talk, they talk about motivation, the feeling, the unsound that is around the universe. They explain everything to one understanding. They bring it all together, and when they finish, just one word comes out. Just one word. They might talk all day, and just one word comes out."  -- Wallace Black Elk, Lakota

 

We need to be careful about judging the old ones when we talk. At first they may not make sense to us. Maybe we'll say they're old fashioned and don't understand. But the old ones do understand! When they speak, listen very carefully. Often it will take weeks or maybe even years before we understand what they are really saying. This is the way of Wisdom. We need to listen, listen, listen.

 

Great Spirit, today, open my ears so I can hear the Elders.

Copyright: Coyhis Publishing found in the book, Meditations with Native American Elders: Any republishing of part or all of their contents is prohibited.

 

 It is fun to watch the confused faces of young ones as I babble on -- obviously speaking English and two or three foreign languages simultaneously.  When I finish the story, it is wonderful to see their eye brows jump up, a big smile appear on their faces and their arms extend waiting for a big bear hug.  ~Lee Standing Bear Moore

 


 

 

New! American Indian Flags

 

Take Pride in Your Tribe -- Fly It High!

See 147 Authentic Tribal Flags

 


 


 

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

 

 

The First People...

Dear Editor,

 

I love the 1st people of Turtle Island for this reason, they were here first. They communicated with the animals and nature. And asked for help from all their brothers, trees, grass, plants, the four legged beings, birds of air, to the four winds and to Mother Earth. This happened long before the white man came to show them a better way.

 

It is interesting to me, that the very bible the white man came to force on them, they already understood “This Great Mystery” from childhood. These great truths were learned from the elders of the tribe. If you doubt this, then spend some time looking into the 1st peoples history. Then sit with your bible and ask the Great Unknown to open your eyes to the following. Read More


 

READ MORE LETTERS TO THE EDITOR - AUGUST 2014

 


 

ENVIRONMENT

 

Hell Hath No Fury

 

Moms to EPA: Recall Monsanto’s Roundup

By Alexis Baden-Mayer, Organic Consumers Association

 

For related articles and information, please visit OCA's All About Organics page, our Genetic Engineering page, and our Millions Against Monsanto page.

Hell hath no fury . . . like a mother whose child has been sickened by a toxin that’s almost impossible to avoid.

Two activist groups, Moms Across America and Thinking Moms Revolution, want the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to recall Monsanto’s Roundup, the most widely used herbicide/pesticide in the world.

Now is the time to do it, they say, because the EPA is conducting a registration review of glyphosate, the key ingredient in Roundup.

Representatives of the two groups contacted the EPA to request a meeting. When the EPA ignored them, they rallied supporters.

 


 

EVENTS CALENDAR

 

August 2, 2014 - Saturday

Poetry reading at Catskill Arts Society

48 Main Street, Livingston Manor, NY 12758

(845) 436-4227

Susan Deer Cloud and Evan Pritchard will read from new book, “Greetings from Mawenawasic.”

info@catskillartsociety.org

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August 6 - 10, 2014

Drum Building Workshop

International workshop, Sweden

A Chance to come and build your own Shaman Drum,

the same way the old Shamans did ! In cooperation with

The Nature, Power Animals and Spirits!

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August 7, 2014 7-10pm - Thursday

Make a Full Moon Magic Wand  
by Regina Compernolle: Dogwood Forest, 1412 W. 12th Kansas City, Mo 64111
The wand is a tool to focus your mind and energy. We start the class with a meditation on the direction we would like our lives to take us. We will learn about the folklore around different kinds of wood and explore the properties of various crystals and symbols used to construct the wands. We will create a ceremony to charge the wands with the feminine power of the full moon. $30 

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August 8, 9 & 10, 2014

16th Annual Great Basin Language Conference

Keeping the Ancient Voices Alive

Nüümü Yadoha Language Program

Bishop Paiute Gymnasium

Gym-Barlow Lane, Bishop, CA

$20 Registration Fee - Make checks payable to the: Owens Valley Career Development Center

For more information, please contact Qwina West, Interim Language Director

OVCDC-TANF Nüümü Yadoha Program

Bishop, CA 93514

(760) 873-5701 Ext 451 Fax (760) 873-7665 email: qwest@ovcdc.com

We are looking for Vendors, Language Presenters and a Caterer. Please call for more information and Application.

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August 14, 2014 7-9:30pm - Thursday

Masks for the Forest

by Regina Compernolle: Dogwood Forest, 1412 W. 12th Kansas City, Mo 64111
Love Offering.  Come make a mask to honor your connection to our friends the trees. We'll take a walk in the forest to connect with the trees and fill ourselves full of woodsy smells and life force. Then we'll make a ceramic mask to be hung in the forest as part of an exhibit that will take place October 11th. Really fun! All ages welcome. Wear shoes suitable for light hiking.

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August 16 - August 17

1st Annual Laurel Highlands Native American Gathering
1559 Route 711, Stahlstown, PA - 15687
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August 16 - August 17

34th Annual Roasting Ears of Corn Festival
2825 Fish Hatchery Road, Allentown, PA - 18103

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August 12, 15, 19, 22, 26 - Tuesdays & 2 Fridays, 12noon to 2pm,  (Eastern time; 10 hours total)

Alchemy of Peace: Create Your Personal Power Field (Level 1 Class)

Teleclass - On your computer or phone PowerPoint will be sent to you; Just phone into class.

Presenter: Dr. Gail Lash

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August 23, 2014 from 10am to 4pm

Folk Fabulous Music and Art Festival

Traditions, Change & Celebration: Native Artists of the Southeast (year-long exhibit)

Mckissick Museum, University of South Carolina  Historic Horseshoe at USC

Exhibition from NC, SC, FL, VA, GA, TX, TN, KY  

Featuring Roger Amerman's beautifully beaded Choctaw Frontier Jacket as one of over 40 artists.

The historic "Five Civilized Tribes" are featured and have significant presence in the exhibition including the Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek, and Seminole. Yet we also have a wonderful collection of Pamunkey Indian Pottery from Virginia, who just recently gained federal recognition, highlighting their Chief Kevin Brown's pottery. We also have art from the Poarch Band Creeks, the basketry of John Paul Darden of the Chitimatcha Indians of Louisiana, Bill Harris of the Catawba Indian Nation's pottery. 

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August 30 - 31, 2014 

Union-Conformidad-Conquista

La Casa Guanajuato,  1002 W. Brooklyn Ave, Dallas, TX

(corner of S. Polk St and W. Pembroke Ave, or W. Brooklyn Ave and Buckalew St).

Velacion / Danza of Santa Clara, “In Chicuace Tonatiuh” (El Sexto Sol),

Danza Conchero Azteca de la Gran Tenochtitlan.

Jorge Cruz y Maria A. Ortega, Jefes  del Cuartel Conchero Azteca y la danza In Chicuace Tonatiuh, of North, Texas.  We invite you to the annual Velacion and Danza of the altar of Santa Clara.  The ceremony will take place in Oak Cliff, Dallas, Texas on August 30th and 31th, 2014.  This invitation is open to you, your family, the community and anyone with good faith in joining us in this ceremony and the following activities:

Welcoming and Dinner:  Saturday, August 30, 2014 at 09:00 pm.

Velacion:  Saturday, August 30th/31th  2014, at 12:00 am (Midnight).

Danza: Sunday, August 31th, 2014 early morning.

Lunch/Dinner: After the Danza is over.

Conclusion of Ceremony and Activities: Late afternoon on Sunday, August 31th, 2014.

For more information please call 214-732-2931.

Danza Conchera Azteca-In Chicuace Tonatiuh-Culture and Nahualt Tradition.

Danza y Jefes, Jorge Cruz y Maria A. Ortega, El es Dios  

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September 21, 2014

Workshop in Dance and Shamanism for Women

Through oriental tribal dance you gain insight into ancient techniques /theories and you have the opportunity to experience how your body can be a spiritual tool—a tool which can give you deeper contact with your own and with the collective female primordial force.
Through Shamanic drum travel and guided travelling into the body we will seek knowledge of our own inner resources and origins and we will seek out and try to wake up dormant memories and individual potential.
 

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October 5 - 8, 2014

Bioproducts World Showcase and Conference

Ohio State University

Columbus Hilton Downtown and Columbus Convention Center

BIC, a Bioproducts Innovation Center at The Ohio State University is proud to announce a first-of-its-kind event to accelerate the manufacturing, distribution, and use of bio-based products.  We will bring together procurement officials and commercial buyers with producers of bio-based materials and product manufacturers to facilitate business relationships through the bio-product industry. 

www.bioproductsworld.org

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POWWOW CALENDAR

 

AUGUST

August 01 - August 03

50th Annual Rocky Boy Celebration
PO Box 544, Box Elder, Montana – 59521

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August 01 - 03, 2014

35th Annual Kamloopa Powwow

Kamloops. British Columbia, Canada

Special Events Facility. #5 Yellowhead Hwy. Would you like to Volunteer for this years exciting weekend, please contact the Kamloopa PowWow Society There are many positions to be filled, such as: Security, Monday Clean-up, Janitorial, Maintenance, Gates & Parking, and Concession (Chinese Food, Main, Pizza, Fruit). Princess Pageant Contestants will be selling 50-50's through-out the weekend, largest prize in 2012 was $2750 as the split..  Delyla Daniels.  

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August 02 - 03, 2014

Bear Mountain Powwow

Stony Point. Anthony Wayne Recreation Area at Harriman State Park. Palisades Interstate Parkway, Stony Point, NY 10980. Saturday August 3rd, 11am ? 8pm, Sunday August 4th, 11am ? 7pm Grand Entry of Dancers at 1pm and 4pm Price: $14 Adults & Teens (Plus fees if purchasing online), $8 Children 6-12 years old & Seniors 65+ (Plus fees if purchasing online), No fee for Children 5 years old and under; $8 Parking  718.686.9297

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August 02 - 03, 2014

Canfield Island Powwow

Canfield Island Park. Greevey Road. Montoursville, PA

Head Man: Willie 4 Crows. Others TBA. Pot luck dinner on Saturday. Camping for vendors and dancers.  Millie or Nichole.   570-267-8706 or 570-777-2852.  

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August  02 - 03, 2014

South Bayfront Powwow

Marina View Park. 900 Marina Parkway, Chula Vista, CA

This powwow brings a rich diversity of native American music, dance, arts & crafts and food to Chula Vista. The powwow is a traditional inter- tribal gathering with dance and ceremony. Open to the public, the powwow as a free educational and cultural event. This event creates a connection to the historic past of San Diego Bay and our local diversity, highlighting our region's Native American heritage. We welcome back world renown tribal elder Randy Edmonds as our Master of Ceremony.

Rick Orvedal.  619-796-6769.

 

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August 01 - August 03

48th Annual Menominee Nation Contest Powwow
Keshena, Keshena, WI
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August 01 - August 03

Kamloopa Powwow
315 Yellowhead Hwy, Kamloops, BC
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August 02 - August 03

Bear Mountain Powwow 2014
Palisades Interstate Parkway, , Stony Point, NY - 10980
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August 02 - August 03

3rd Annual South Bayfront Powwow
900 Marina Parkway, Chula Vista, CA - 91910
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August 02 - August 03

2nd annual AuGlaize Village Powwow
12296 Krouse rd, Defiance , Ohio – 43512

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August 02 - August 03
Canfield Island Powwow
Greevey Road, Montoursville, Pennsylvania – 17754

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August 02 - August 03

21st Annual Suscol Intertribal Council Powwow "Honoring Resiliency of Native People"
100 California Dr, Yountville, CA - 94599
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August 02 - August 03

3rd Annual South Bayfront Powwow
West in "J" Street Exit I-5, Chula Vista, CA – 91910

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August 02 - August 03

Lou "Black Eagle" Saco River Intertribal Powwow
River Road, North Conway, NH – 03860

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August 02 - August 04

Wikwemikong 54th Annual Cultural Festival
Manitoulin Island, Manitoulin Island, ON

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August 06 - August 10

100th Meskwaki Powwow Anniversary
176 Battleground Road, Tama, Iowa – 52339

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August 06 - August 10

Meskwaki Powwow
Battleground Road, Tama, IA – 52339

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August 07, 2014 - Tree Day

Yankton Dakota  'Tiyospaye'  Ceremony

Pipestone Monument, Pipestone, MN

D Watson  -  G Drapeau Sr, early advisor; dekshi s... koda s... oyate...la gente...relatives... ungweh howeh...  people...Yanktonai-Dakota prayer-dance-ceremony-fast at Pipestone -- sun dance - Wiwanyang Wacipi

Anishnabe relatives - LCO, Hayward, WI

camp set up before or by 08/02/14 Sat  -  until Tues  -  08/12/14 Iniipi/sweats during camp; women's moon camp if needed.  Ceremony:  08/07 -- 11 /14 (5 days total, Thrs -- Mon) Clean-up 08/12/14

 

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August 07 - August 10

51st Shoshone-Bannock Festival
P.O. Box 306, Fort Hall, ID – 83203

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August 07 - August 10

UmonhonHe'dewachi
Macy, Nebraska

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August 07 - August 10

Siksiikaitsitapiiks Pow Wow 2014
Box 1100 , Siksika, Alberta - AB T0J 3W0

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August 07 - August 11

P.I.P.E. Peoples International Powwow Event
Milton Abbas, Blandford, Dorset - DT11 0AT

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August 08 - August 10

Spirit of the People Powwow
46770 Bailey Road, Chilliwack, BC
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August 08 - August 10

Sacramento Powwow
715 Broadway, Sacramento, CA - 95818
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August 08 - August 10

2nd Annual Dark Mountain Native American Gathering
499 Reservoir Rd., Wilkesboro, NC – 28697

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August 08 - August 10

Swinomish Days Powwow 2014
16966 Reservation Rd
, La Conner, WA

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August 08 - August 10

38th Annual Mohican Veterans Powwow
Many Trails Park on MohHeConNuck Road, Bowler , WI – 54416

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August 08 - August 10

Mihsihkinaahkwa Powwow
1035 St. Rd. 205, Columbia City, Indiana – 46725

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August 08 - August 10

Turkey River Powwow and Rendezvous
327 N Maple St, Postville, Iowa – 52162

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August 08 - 10, 2014

1st Annual Turkey River Powwow

Postville Fairgrounds. Maple Street, Postville. Iowa

Powwow and rendezvous. We are in need of dancers and venders; please contact the below number if you or anyone you know is interested.  John Miller.  563-422-8975.  

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August 09 - August 09

Spirit of Nations Powwow
3301 E. Magnolia Avenue, Knoxville, TN – 37914

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August 09 - August 10

9th Annual Rock, Rattle & Drum Powwow
Old Columbia Street (off of Route 8), Adams, MA, Adams, MA – 01220

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August 09 - August 10

58th Annual O-Sa-Wan Powwow
801 E. Francis Road, New Lenox, IL – 60451

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August 09 - August 10

23rd Annual Odawa Homecoming Powwow
7500 Odawa Circle, Harbor Springs, MI – 49740

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August 09 - August 10

14th Annual Robert Canada Friendship Powwow
22215 S. Elaine Avenue, Hawaiian Gardens, CA – 90716

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August 09 - August 10

339th Annual Narragansett Tribe August Meeting Powwow
Old Mill Road, Charlestown, RI – 02813

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August 09 - August 10

Mother Earth's Creation's Annual Intertribal Powwow
2145 White Mountain Highway, West Ossipee, NH – 03890

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August 12 - August 14

2014 Cowessess Tradional Powwow
26 km North of Broadview, Sask. on the 605 grid, Cowessess FN, Saskatchewan - S0G 5L0

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August 15 - August 17

2014 Southern Company Contest Powwow
4.5 miles SE of Montezuma Creek, Montezuma Creek, UT

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August 15 - August 17

Algonquins of Pikwakanagan Annual Powwow
Pikwakangan, Golden Lake, Ontario - K0J1X0

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August 15 - August 17

Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community Wacipi
3212 Dakotah Parkway, Prior Lake, MN – 55372

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Turs Around Powwow
August 15 - August 17

American Legion Park, Poplar, Montana – 59255

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August 16 - 17, 2014

14th Annual Daniel Nimham Powwow

Veteran’s Memorial Park, 201 Gypsy Trail Rd, Carmel NY 10512.

11 AM to 6 PM. Gil Tarbox: (845) 255-8154

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August 16 - August 17

9th Annual Turtle Island Powwow
4351 Babe Howard Blvd, Millington, TN – 38053

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August 16 - August 17

18th Annual Shawnee Woodland Powwow-Summer
7092 St. Rt. 540, Bellefontaine, OH – 43311

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August 16 - August 17

Festival of the Horse & Drum Intertribal Powwow
525 Randall Rd, St Charles, IL – 60174

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August 16 - August 17

Bellowing of the Bulls Powwow
6975 N. Ray Rd., Fremont

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August 22 - August 22

Celebrations Of Generations
5318 Chief Brown Lane, Darrington, WA – 98241

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August 22 - August 24

Heart of Creator Pow Wow Potlatch
Park Way, Siletz , OR. – 97380

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August 22 - August 24

Pala's 7th Annual "Honoring Traditions" Powwow

10779 Hwy 76, Pala, CA - 92059

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August 22 - August 24

7th Annual Honoring Traditions Powwow
10779 Hwy 76, Pala, CA – 92059

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August 22 - August 24

Government Hill Powwow Grounds
P.O Box 472, Siletz, OR - 97380

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August 22 - August 24

Cha Cha Bah Ning 34thTraditional Powwow
21 mi N of Deer River MN on, Hwy 46R. Co. Rd. 35 (Inger Rd.) , Inger, MN – 56636

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August 23 - August 24

Turtle Island and Oneonta Powwow
500 New Street, Oneonta, AL – 35121

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August 23 - August 24

5th Annual Spirit of the Wolf Native American Festival
St Highway 29 , Broadalbin, NY – 12025

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August 23 - August 24

11th annual Eastern Woodlands Intertribal Gathering Powwow
7681 St Rt 42 , Lexington, OH - Ohio - 449049715

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August 23 - August 24

12th Annual Timiskaming First Nation
Algonquin Avenue, Notre Dame du Nord, QC - J0Z 3B0

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August 23 - August 24

3d annual "Honoring Our Veterans Gathering"
655 S. Highland Ave, Sidney, OHIO - 45365
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August 23 - August 24

Annual Native American Style Powwow, Cosby TN
4381 Cosby Hwy, Cosby, Tennessee – 37722

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August 23 - August 24

Chippewas of Rama First Nation Annual Powwow
5884 Rama Road, Rama, Ontario - L3V6H6

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August 23, 2014

Honor our Heroes Benefit Gourd Dance for our Warriors: Past and Present

Beaver Springs Park (Quapaw Pow-Wow Grounds)

Quapaw, Oklahoma

Start Time: 1pm to 5pm; Supper Break; 6pm to 10pm

 Vendors Contact or need info:

J Lunsford:  918 325 1309

M Vonmoss:  918 961 0246

PJ Attocknie: 918 541 7351

All Gourd Dancers and Singers are welcomed to attend our event.

All Invited Gourd Clans are invited.

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August 23, 2014

Shandaken Day at Big Indian

Big Indian Park on route 28 in Big Indian, NY

Evan will help lead the opening ceremonies at . There will be various vendors, performers, and events.

Contact Mary Lou Stapleton, (845)254-4238.

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August 23 - 24, 2014

Gathering of Friends Powwow

Meetinghouse Park. 65 Placewood Road (Rte 28)

Allenstown, New Hampshire   603-674-8984

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August 23 - 24, 2014

Minneapolis Amer. Indian Center Circle Powwow

Minneapolis. Minneapolis American Indian Center

1530 East Franklin Ave., Minneapolis, Minnesota.

6-8 PM. Circle of Generations goal is to restore some of the traditional systems of social support and cultural connections for children, youth and families, in order to promote healthy families. 612-879-1785

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August 23 - 24, 2014

3d Annual Honoring Our Veterans Gathering

Shelby County Fairgrounds. 655 S. Highland Ave.

Sidney, Ohio

Head man: Tim Samaniego, Head Lady- Angela Allen, M/C-Aaron Stevens, AD-Mike Park. Vendor fee- 10x10 $50;;10x20 $60; electric is $10 extra contact- Melissa Lusk 419-223-1605, Mary Chambers 937-622-8308 George Reiter 513-256-3146 Open camping for participants, $10 for weekend electric. they have showers and toilets on site. DRUMS: Southern Singers, & Skyhawk, invited drum Wild Band from Arizona & Hoop Dancers, Open drum for blanket money Grand entry Sat. 12pm & 6Pm, SUN 12pm have outside lights for evening dancing. Days Inn 937-492-1131 ask for powwow rate 513-256-3146

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August 24, 2014 - Sunday

Spirit of the Wolf Powwow

Pine Park Route 29, 23 Pine Street Extention, Broadalbin NY

10-5 PM. 10-5 PM. Contact Betty Overrocker, (518)842-6672.

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August 24 - August 25

New Credit - Three Fires Homecoming & Traditional Powwow

2789 1st Line Road, New Credit, ON - N0A 1H0

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August 29 - August 31

27th Annual Squamish Nation Powwow
100 Mathias Road, West Vancouver, BC

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August 29 - August 31

Kickapoo Tribe in Kansas Powwow 2014
Horton, Horton, KS

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August 29 - August 31

Shawnee County Allied Tries, Inc.

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August 29 - August 31

24th Annual Traditional Intertribbal Powwow
SE Tinman Cir, Topeka, Kansas
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August 29 - August 31

Foothills Native American Powwow 2014 Labor Day Weekend
1679,US Hwy 21 N., Thurmond,N.C., North Carolina – 28683

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August 29 - September 01, SD

Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe Annual Labor Day Wacipi

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August 29 - August 31

Similkameen Powwow of Champions
Ashnola River Road, Keremeos , BC - V0X1N0

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August 30 - 31, 2014

6th Annual Ky. Native American Heritage Powwow

Monhollen/Phillips Farm. 4116 Cumberland Falls Highway. Corbin. Kentucky

Traditional Powwow.  Ken Phillips. 606-528-6342.

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August 30 - August 31

Turtle Island Noccalula Falls Powwow
1500 Noccalula Road, Gadsden, AL - 35904

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August 30 - August 31

54th Annual Tecumseh Lodge Powwow
1200 S Main St, Tipton, IN – 46072

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August 30 - August 31

Eufaula Powwow
Lake Eufaula, Lake Eufaula, OK
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August 29 - August 31

Labor Day Contest Powwow
Palace Drive , Cass Lake , MN – 56633

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August 30 - August 31

6th Annual Honoring our Veterans Powwow
4116 Cumberland Falls Hwy, Corbin, KY – 40701

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August 30 - August 31

Santa Rosa Day's Powwow & Gathering
17225 Jersey Ave, Lemoore, CA – 93245

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August 30 - September 01

74th Annual Labor Day Powwow Black Hawk State Historic Site
B
lack Hawk State Historic Site 1510 46th Avenue,, Rock Island, IL - 61201
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August 30 - September 01

Black Hawk State Park Labor Day Powwow
1510 46th Ave, Rock Island, IL – 61201

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August 30 - September 01

North Country Inter-Tribal Powwow
934 Elm Street, Newport, Maine - 04953

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August 31 - September 02

7th Annual Harvest Moon Powwow
2nd Avenue, Gallipolis, Ohio - 45631

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August 30 - September 01, 2014

Kipona Powwow

City Island, Harrisburg, PA

Labor Day Weekend, Sat, Sun, Mon. Evan will tell stories, sing songs, and share local history along the Susquehannah, while signing books in a relaxed indigenous atmosphere. 10 AM to sundown each day. Contact Michelle Fry at (717)589-7744.

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SEPTEMBER

September 12 - 14, 2014

Intertribal Powwow

Lemuel Community Center, 206 Hwy 145 South.

Morven, NC

Vendor spaces are limited.  Jim.  336-618-0561. htttp://nearriverdwellers.com 

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September 13 - 14, 2014

All Nations Benefit Powwow

Susquehanna. PA

The Portal Institute, Inc.. 163 Melrose Avenue. At the foot of the beautiful Appalachian Mountains in Susquehanna, PA there will be an incredible event with good music, good food and good company. Emcee: Quentin Bear. Fuller Arena Director: Bobby Hurt Lead Male: Patrick Littlewolf Brooks; Lead Female: Sparrow Plainbull Jr. Lead Male: Samiakin Redbear; Allen Jr. Lead Female: Rachel Tupponce; Host Drum: Red Blanket Singers Guest Drums: Thundervoice; War Paint & Wild Band; Special Performances by Spirit Winds Eagle Pines Falconry & The Sinquah Family Dancers. Free Parking. Admission includes entry to the museum and art gallery. This is a Rain or Shine Event! Dance Arena is covered! Everyone is Welcome! Native-made Arts, Crafts, & Food, Music, Storytelling, Intertribal & Exhibition Dancing. Day Money for the first 25 dancers who register! Host Hotel: Holiday Inn Express - Gibson 1561 Oliver Road Exit 219 @ I-81 New Milford, PA Tel: (570) 465-5544

Emelie Jeffries

Belize Fund: 570- 727-3614 

Emelie Jeffries.  570-727-3614.

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September 19 - 21, 2014

Battle Point Annual Traditional Powwow

Battle Sugar Point, Battle Point Dr.. (N) 35.9 mi E. on US-2 E of Bemidji Minnesota.  Right Co Rd 8 (Bena) NE/County 8 NE 10.0 mi 8. Turn right Co Rd 73 NE 6.2 mi (S) 20 mi. E of Walker Hwy 200 left MN 84 11.8 m. R. Co. Rd. 73 6.2m. To Battle Point Dr. Vendors: Diane Smith (218) 654-5667  Leah Gale Monroe (218) 760-3127  

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September 20 - 21, 2014

FDR Powwow

Yorktown Heights. FDR State Park. 2957 Crompond Rd, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (Westchester). Saturday & Sunday 11am ? 7pm Grand entry of dancers at 1pm and 4pm Price: $14 Adults & Teens(plus fees if purchasing online), $8 Children 6-12 years old & Seniors 65+(Plus fees if purchasing online) No fee for Children 5 years old and under; $8 Parking 718.686.9297 ********************************************************************************************

September 26 - 28, 2014

14th Annual Buffalo River Powwow

Powwow Grounds. Airport Ridge Rd. Linden, Tenn.

Traditional Powwow. Special guests: East Tennessee Overhill Cherokee Descendants. Dancing, Drumming, Arts & Crafts..  Ray or Sharron Benge.  931-589-9628.  ********************************************************************************************

September 26 - 28, 2014

Chickahominy Tribal Powwow

Providence Forge, VA

Keith Wynn, (804) 966-2448 or (804) 829-2027

 

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OCTOBER

October 10 - 11, 2014

5th Annual Running Water Singers Powwow

Fayetteville, NC   

(910) 366-9164

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October 18 -19, 2014

Native American Cherokee Trail River Festival

Granby Gardens Park. 1800 12th Street Ext. Cayce, SC 29033.

Fun Festival for the entire family. Native American Dancers in Regalia History of the Cherokee Trail and Demonstrators Story Telling, Children Activities Craft Vendors, Food Vendors .  Laura Bailey.  803-366-1705.   ********************************************************************************************

October 18, 2014

American Indian Festival

Clearwater Nature Center, Upper Marlboro, MD

Karen Marshall (301) 297-4575

Looking for vendors and demonstrators.

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NOVEMBER

November 14-16, 2014

Great American Indian Exposition Powwow

Richmond Raceway, 600 E. Laburnum Ave. 

Richmond, VA

A special ceremony will be held in appreciation of veterans on Saturday and Sunday.  On Saturday, gates will open at 10:00AM (for early shoppers), and the event will kick off with a parade of nations (grand entry) at 12:00 noon.  Over 100 Tribes and over 200 American Indians in regalia (outfits) will be represented at this year’s event, and they include:  Haliwa-Saponi, Pamunkey, Piscataway, Chickahominy, Cherokee, Rappahannock, Sioux, Iroquois, Lumbee, Hopi, Mattaponi, Nansemond, Choctaw, Navajo, and so many other Tribes and nations.  Barry Richardson (252) 532-0821

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November 15, 2014

2nd Annual Veterans Powwow

St John's Episcopal Church. 158 West High Street.

Somerville, New Jersey

Harold Willard 718 753 1077  

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November 18- 19, 2014

Mekoce Shawnee Raptor Sanctuary Powwow

Bunners Ridge Road. Fairmount, West Virginia

Sagebrush Roundup, Benefit powwow for the MSWV raptor sanctuary birds of prey. The birds will be on shown at the powwow both days.Head Man: Aaron Two Hawks Bosnick. Head Lady: Bree Little Bear Brumage. MC: John White Hawk Dailey. Invited Drums- White Oak Singers, and Red Circle. .  Susan Snow Owl Woman Lewis.  304-376-5137  

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November 22 - 23, 2014

Baltimore American Indian Center

Towson University

(410) 675-3535 or 

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April 17-19, 2015

Haliwa-Saponi Indian Tribe 50th Annual Powwow

Hollister, NC

(252) 586-4017

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July 11 - 12, 2015

Howard County Maryland Powwow

1022 Fairgrounds Road West Friendship, MD 21794

 

 

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