SMOKE SIGNAL NEWS - JULY 2014

SMOKE SIGNAL NEWS

JULY 2014

 

Independence Day

July 4

Parents Day

July 27

Eid Mubarak - Eid al-Fitr

July 29

 

 


 

ELDERS SPEAK

 

"All the stones that are around here, each one has a language of its own. Even the earth has a song."  -- -- Wallace Black Elk, Lakota

 

To believe that every tree, plant, and insect can talk takes an open mind. Go by yourself into nature and sit quietly. Then pick up a rock and listen to your thoughts. After a while, put that rock down and pick up another rock. Your thoughts will change. These are the voices and wisdom of the Stone People. Each one has different wisdom and they are willing to share their wisdom with you. Many of the Stone People are very old and very wise.

 

Great Spirit, let every rock and leaf be my teacher.

 

Copyright: Coyhis Publishing found in the book, Meditations with Native American Elders: Any republishing of part or all of their contents is prohibited.

 

Each and every tiny thing, every human, animal, bird, fish, insect, plant and stones on Earth Mother vibrate to their own individual frequency that creates its own language.  Learning to listen and feel each vibration is not easy if all we hear is our own voice.  We must be sensitive to the vibrations of the Earth so that we may understand nature and her needs. ~Lee Standing Bear Moore 

 


 

Manataka Offering Edible Insects!

 

The Manataka American Indian Council has teamed up with World Entomophagy, Inc. to bring you fine quality, eco-friendly, safe and wonderfully tasting edible insects that have been processed for ready-to-use recipes.  

 

Manataka believes that eating insects (entomophagy) is very healthy and one day will become a tremendously beneficial food source for the United States and help alleviate the global food crisis.  Unlike beef, chicken and other livestock that consumes over one-third of the food crops grown in the U.S., insects can be raised on a small fraction of feed.  Livestock also creates 20% of polluting greenhouse gases such as methane and ammonia that are 23 times more powerful than carbon dioxide. The total population of insects worldwide do not produce any significant harmful gases.  Beef and other grazing livestock also consume a great deal of agricultural land, labor and resources.  With insects there are no veterinary bills, no problem with manure disposal, and a lot less cost to process and package.

 

According to Aletheia Price in our article, Eating Bugs!!, "Raising insects is environmentally friendly. They require minimal space per pound of protein produced, have a better feed to meat ratio than any other animal you can raise, and are very low on the food chain. They are healthy, tasty, and have been utilized for the entire history of mankind (after all, it is easier to catch a grub than a mammoth)."

 

There are over 1,400 recorded species of edible insects that can be raised in eco-clean environments.  Compared to beef, lamb, pork, birds and fish, insects contain a lot more protein and less fat and calories.  Yet, insects are chalked full of many vitamins and minerals.  Eating insects may seem yucky, but you may not realize that every person inadvertently consumes over a pound of insects in their lifetime found in processed foods.


Insects are tasty. Really!  
BUY NOW!

 


 

HOLIDAY FEATURE

 

Do American Indians Celebrate the 4th of July?

Interviews with Native American Tribes

 

Carnegie, Oklahoma: We celebrate every 4th Gourd Dancing, camping, and visiting my Kiowa people while we’re here, listening to the beautiful Kiowa songs. For three days we are just in Kiowa heaven. Been doing this for years. Now my parents have gone on, but we will continue to attend the Kiowa Gourd Dance Celebration.

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: Do American Indians celebrate the 4th of July? Answer: Yes, it represents freedom in the United States of America. Freedom to continue to worship Creator, freedom to dance my prayers, freedom to sweat, freedom to rise early and pray the day in and be up late to pray the day out. We, the Host People, celebrate the 4th of July every day!

Prewitt, New Mexico, and the Navajo Nation: No, I do not celebrate. Because I as a Diné will never relinquish my belief or understanding that we as a people and a nation have the right to be loyal to the Holy Ones before all others, including the United States of America, since we as a people existed long before there was ever a United States
.    
READ MORE...

 

 


Forbidden fruits create many jams


 

Apache Belt Buckle®. 

 

Each piece is signed/numbered by famous Silversmith Pepe Romano of Taxco, Mexico. 

 

Hand Chased Married Metals In German Silver and Pure Copper are inlaid with Pacific Abalone Shell, Horn, Bone, and Orange Brazil Wood.

 

Measuring approximately 4" by 4", it weighs approx. 2¼  ounces or 61 grams. 

 

Costello International is dedicated to preserving the cultural heritage of rural indigenous artisan communities since 1972.  Costello International is a member of The Fair Trade Federation and Green America.  A portion of our profits goes to the Workers Defense Project of Austin, Texas.

 

Two month waiting list; delivery for an order placed now will be shipped around July 25th, 2014.   A 50% non-refundable deposit of $49.97 is required.  Full price only: $99.95 each + shipping

 


 

HEALTH WATCH

 

Earthing and Insomnia

By  Martin Zucker

 

Don’t sleep well?  Have a hard time falling asleep?

 

You’re definitely not alone. 

 

Sleep is increasingly recognized as a public health issue, with sleep insufficiency linked to motor vehicle crashes, industrial disasters, occupational errors, and a greater likelihood to suffer from hypertension, diabetes, depression, obesity, increased mortality, and reduced quality of life and productivity

 

About 30-40 percent of adults have some symptoms of insomnia within a given year, according to the National Center for Sleep Disorders Research at the National Institutes of Health. Of those, some 10-15 percent describe their problem as chronic. They have it all the time.

 

Most often, people experience chronic-intermittent insomnia, which means difficulty sleeping for a few nights, followed by a few nights of adequate sleep before the problem returns.  Insomnia can be a disorder in its own right, but often it is a symptom of some other disease or condition, and many times related to stress and worry. In the case of stress-induced insomnia, the degree to which sleep is disturbed depends on the severity and duration of the stressful situation.    READ MORE...

 


 

ELDERS SPEAK

 

Sleeping Grandfather Mountain

"...the sacred ceremonies given to us by the Creator are the Heart of our existence. These ceremonies are our first duty."

-- Traditional Circle of Elders. Northern Cheyenne

 

Hidden in the ceremonies are many truths, many principles, many guidelines for living — our access to the Unseen World, healing and visions. Because the Indian People didn't have schools or books, the Great Spirit gave us Ceremonies. The ceremonies are handed down from generation to generation to learn their meaning. Today, many Indian People live in cities or urban areas where it's hard to learn the ceremonies. We need to go to the Elders and learn the ceremonies so we can pass them on to our children.

 

Great Spirit, teach me the Secrets of the Ceremonies.

 

Copyright: Coyhis Publishing found in the book, Meditations with Native American Elders: Any republishing of part or all of their contents is prohibited.

 

We at Manataka and thousands of visitors perform sacred Ceremony of many nations to honor those who come in prayer to give thanks for this sacred site. It is a joy to participate and learn the truths and unseen guides.  ~Lee Standing Bear Moore 

 


 

FEATURE


 

Rainbows, Thunder Beings and the Origins of Humans
©by Doug George-Kanentiio

The origin of the rainbow in Iroquois cosmology is explained in the "Iroquois Creation Story"  by the late John Mohawk-Satsisowah of the Seneca Nation.  Mohawk edited a manuscript compiled by the Onondaga-Seneca Chief John Arthur Gibson and the Tuscarora ethnologist JNB Hewitt in 1899 and self published the completed work in 2005. In his edition Mohawk writes:

"Our story holds that we have much that we should be happy about, and evidence of this great good fortune is the manifestation of the gifts of nature.  But even these gifts of nature are part of a grander scheme. These are ultimately the gifts of the beings of the Sky World, those who conceived of and created that which we experience as nature. We are now able to see evidence of this great good fortune which positions us in a special relationship to that which is called nature. We are now urged to do more than give gratitude. We, as human beings are urged to join in the sacred act."   READ MORE...   

 


 

 

BUFFALO NATION

The Children are Crying

 

 

 

Purchase this full feature documentary today! 

"Young people and Indian people need to know that we existed in the 20th Century. We need to know who our heroes are and to know what we have done and accomplished in this century other than what Olympic athletes Jim Thorpe and Billy Mills have done."  ~Russell Means

$29.95 plus $6 shipping

 

 


 

FEATURE

 

Stars in Iroquois Culture
©by Doug George-Kanentiio

Akwesasne Mohawk

The Ohen:ton Karihwatehkwen is the Mohawk "Thanksgiving Address" said before any social, ceremonial or political gathering. It consists of 18 parts in which different elements of the universe are formally acknowledged and given gratitude. Among those elements are earth, plants, animals, winds, sun, moon and stars.  For the stars the speaker will say the following:

We give thanks to the Stars who are spread across the sky like jewellery. We see them in the night helping the Moon to light the darkness and bringing dew to the gardens and growing things. When we travel at night they guide us home. With our minds gathered as one we send greetings and thanks to all the Stars.   READ MORE...

 

 



 

BOOK REVIEW

 

DANNY BLACKGOAT, NAVAJO PRISONER

by Tim Tingle

 

Reading Level: 4.0
Danny Blackgoat is a teenager in 1864 Navajo country when United States soldiers burn down his home, kill his sheep, capture his family, and force them all to walk at gunpoint to an Army fort far from their homeland. This forced exodus of the Navajo people was called the Long Walk of 1864, and during the journey, Danny is labeled a troublemaker and given the name Fire Eye. Refusing to accept captivity, he is sent to Fort Davis, Texas, a Civil War prisoner outpost. There he battles bullying fellow prisoners, rattlesnakes, and abusive soldiers, until he meets Jim Davis. Davis teaches Danny how to hold his anger and starts him on the road to literacy. In a stunning climax, Davis—who builds coffins for the dead—aids Danny in a daring and dangerous escape.

 

Set in troubled times, Danny Blackgoat, Navajo Prisoner is the story of one boy’s hunger to be free and to be Navajo.

Description: Publisher:  Native Voices, 2013. Paperback,  Width: 4.5", Height: 7.0"  144 pages ISBN: 9781939053039

Price: 11.95 + s/h 


 

FOOD - NUTRITION

 

Field to Fork: Big Pine Paiute Tribe
of the Owens Valley

By Sarah Hernandez, First Nations Program Coordinator


The Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley is located on the Big Pine Indian Reservation in California, at the foot of the Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains.

The tribe’s early ancestors utilized the land and water to create irrigated areas that produced the tribe’s main food source. However, at the turn of the twentieth century, the city of Los Angeles purchased most of the land and water rights in the Owens Valley and transferred them to the Los Angeles basin, thus severing the tribe’s connection with the land and water and interfering with its ability to feed its own people.

Today, the Big Pine Reservation is considered a “food desert” because of the lack of access to healthy and affordable food. In 2010, the tribe established the Sustainable Food System Development Project to transform its food desert into a more robust, sustainable food system by establishing a perma-culture garden.  
READ MORE...

 

Field to Fork: Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley - See more at: http://indiangiver.firstnations.org/nl140506-01/#sthash.DkuNMPxg.dpuf
Field to Fork: Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley - See more at: http://indiangiver.firstnations.org/nl140506-01/#sthash.DkuNMPxg.dpuf
Field to Fork: Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley - See more at: http://indiangiver.firstnations.org/nl140506-01/#sthash.DkuNMPxg.dpuf
Field to Fork: Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley - See more at: http://indiangiver.firstnations.org/nl140506-01/#sthash.DkuNMPxg.dpuf
The Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley is located on the Big Pine Indian Reservation in California, at the foot of the Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains. The tribe’s early ancestors utilized the land and water to create irrigated areas that produced the tribe’s main food source. However, at the turn of the twentieth century, the city of Los Angeles purchased most of the land and water rights in the Owens Valley and transferred them to the Los Angeles basin, thus severing the tribe’s connection with the land and water and interfering with its ability to feed its own people.

Today, the Big Pine Reservation is considered a “food desert” because of the lack of access to healthy and affordable food. In 2010, the tribe established the Sustainable Food System Development Project to transform its food desert into a more robust, sustainable food system by establishing a permaculture garden.

In 2013, First Nations awarded the Big Pine Paiute Tribe $37,500 through the Native Agriculture and Food Sovereignty Initiative (NAFSI) to expand the permaculture garden to include a demonstration site, a fruit orchard, a seed bank, and a weekly farmers’ market. This grant, underwritten by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, has allowed the tribe to develop an innovative field-to-fork model that will sustain the community for generations to come.

This grant allowed the tribe to expand their small permaculture garden into a larger educational community garden that teaches tribal members how to plant, grow and harvest healthy, organic heirloom fruits and vegetables as well as Native plants and medicine. The tribe used the expanded permaculture garden as a demonstration site to conduct several classes and workshops, including a three-day intensive permaculture course, food policy/sovereignty classes, youth mentoring sessions, and numerous gardening workshops.

The gardening workshops, in particular, have been very popular among tribal members. At these workshops, tribal members learn about composting, caring for plants and respecting ecosystems. Many workshop participants used these lessons to create their own personal home gardens. These workshops encouraged tribal members to start their own gardens while simultaneously attending to the community garden. As a result of these hands-on workshops, tribal members helped plant, grow and harvest more than 100 pounds of squash, cucumbers, tomatoes, green beans and bell peppers that were eventually donated to the tribal grocery store.

Many tribal members also volunteered at the expanded permaculture garden site outside of these workshops. For example, several volunteers helped plant 50 perennial fruit trees. The trees did not yield any fruit this season. However, once these trees mature, they have the potential to yield hundreds of pounds of fruit. These trees will produce healthy, fresh fruit for generations. The tribe speculates that eventually they will need to hire more workers to maintain the fruit orchard and the ever-expanding permaculture garden.

The tribe determined which fruits and vegetables to plant in the permaculture garden by conducting a community survey. This survey also helped the tribe determine which seeds to collect and store for the seed bank. The purpose of the seed bank is to gather the seeds of plants originally grown in the region and preserve them for future generations. The seed bank is a continuing process that will grow as the tribe becomes more and more aware of its needs and learns proper seed-saving techniques.

A portion of this grant was also used to host weekly farmers’ markets that helped farmers and workshop participants sell their fruits and vegetables. These farmers markets are intended to help growers earn extra money and provide tribal members with a healthy alternative to processed foods.

The Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley developed the Sustainable Food System Development Project to improve the physical health and well-being of their people and to preserve their tribal community for generations to come. The success of this innovative field-to-fork model reiterates that tribes have the potential to strengthen and improve their own communities.

By Sarah Hernandez, First Nations Program Coordinator

- See more at: http://indiangiver.firstnations.org/nl140506-01/#sthash.DkuNMPxg.dpuf
The Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley is located on the Big Pine Indian Reservation in California, at the foot of the Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains. The tribe’s early ancestors utilized the land and water to create irrigated areas that produced the tribe’s main food source. However, at the turn of the twentieth century, the city of Los Angeles purchased most of the land and water rights in the Owens Valley and transferred them to the Los Angeles basin, thus severing the tribe’s connection with the land and water and interfering with its ability to feed its own people.

Today, the Big Pine Reservation is considered a “food desert” because of the lack of access to healthy and affordable food. In 2010, the tribe established the Sustainable Food System Development Project to transform its food desert into a more robust, sustainable food system by establishing a permaculture garden.

In 2013, First Nations awarded the Big Pine Paiute Tribe $37,500 through the Native Agriculture and Food Sovereignty Initiative (NAFSI) to expand the permaculture garden to include a demonstration site, a fruit orchard, a seed bank, and a weekly farmers’ market. This grant, underwritten by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, has allowed the tribe to develop an innovative field-to-fork model that will sustain the community for generations to come.

This grant allowed the tribe to expand their small permaculture garden into a larger educational community garden that teaches tribal members how to plant, grow and harvest healthy, organic heirloom fruits and vegetables as well as Native plants and medicine. The tribe used the expanded permaculture garden as a demonstration site to conduct several classes and workshops, including a three-day intensive permaculture course, food policy/sovereignty classes, youth mentoring sessions, and numerous gardening workshops.

The gardening workshops, in particular, have been very popular among tribal members. At these workshops, tribal members learn about composting, caring for plants and respecting ecosystems. Many workshop participants used these lessons to create their own personal home gardens. These workshops encouraged tribal members to start their own gardens while simultaneously attending to the community garden. As a result of these hands-on workshops, tribal members helped plant, grow and harvest more than 100 pounds of squash, cucumbers, tomatoes, green beans and bell peppers that were eventually donated to the tribal grocery store.

Many tribal members also volunteered at the expanded permaculture garden site outside of these workshops. For example, several volunteers helped plant 50 perennial fruit trees. The trees did not yield any fruit this season. However, once these trees mature, they have the potential to yield hundreds of pounds of fruit. These trees will produce healthy, fresh fruit for generations. The tribe speculates that eventually they will need to hire more workers to maintain the fruit orchard and the ever-expanding permaculture garden.

The tribe determined which fruits and vegetables to plant in the permaculture garden by conducting a community survey. This survey also helped the tribe determine which seeds to collect and store for the seed bank. The purpose of the seed bank is to gather the seeds of plants originally grown in the region and preserve them for future generations. The seed bank is a continuing process that will grow as the tribe becomes more and more aware of its needs and learns proper seed-saving techniques.

A portion of this grant was also used to host weekly farmers’ markets that helped farmers and workshop participants sell their fruits and vegetables. These farmers markets are intended to help growers earn extra money and provide tribal members with a healthy alternative to processed foods.

The Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley developed the Sustainable Food System Development Project to improve the physical health and well-being of their people and to preserve their tribal community for generations to come. The success of this innovative field-to-fork model reiterates that tribes have the potential to strengthen and improve their own communities.

By Sarah Hernandez, First Nations Program Coordinator

- See more at: http://indiangiver.firstnations.org/nl140506-01/#sthash.DkuNMPxg.dpuf
The Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley is located on the Big Pine Indian Reservation in California, at the foot of the Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains. The tribe’s early ancestors utilized the land and water to create irrigated areas that produced the tribe’s main food source. However, at the turn of the twentieth century, the city of Los Angeles purchased most of the land and water rights in the Owens Valley and transferred them to the Los Angeles basin, thus severing the tribe’s connection with the land and water and interfering with its ability to feed its own people.

Today, the Big Pine Reservation is considered a “food desert” because of the lack of access to healthy and affordable food. In 2010, the tribe established the Sustainable Food System Development Project to transform its food desert into a more robust, sustainable food system by establishing a permaculture garden.

In 2013, First Nations awarded the Big Pine Paiute Tribe $37,500 through the Native Agriculture and Food Sovereignty Initiative (NAFSI) to expand the permaculture garden to include a demonstration site, a fruit orchard, a seed bank, and a weekly farmers’ market. This grant, underwritten by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, has allowed the tribe to develop an innovative field-to-fork model that will sustain the community for generations to come.

This grant allowed the tribe to expand their small permaculture garden into a larger educational community garden that teaches tribal members how to plant, grow and harvest healthy, organic heirloom fruits and vegetables as well as Native plants and medicine. The tribe used the expanded permaculture garden as a demonstration site to conduct several classes and workshops, including a three-day intensive permaculture course, food policy/sovereignty classes, youth mentoring sessions, and numerous gardening workshops.

The gardening workshops, in particular, have been very popular among tribal members. At these workshops, tribal members learn about composting, caring for plants and respecting ecosystems. Many workshop participants used these lessons to create their own personal home gardens. These workshops encouraged tribal members to start their own gardens while simultaneously attending to the community garden. As a result of these hands-on workshops, tribal members helped plant, grow and harvest more than 100 pounds of squash, cucumbers, tomatoes, green beans and bell peppers that were eventually donated to the tribal grocery store.

Many tribal members also volunteered at the expanded permaculture garden site outside of these workshops. For example, several volunteers helped plant 50 perennial fruit trees. The trees did not yield any fruit this season. However, once these trees mature, they have the potential to yield hundreds of pounds of fruit. These trees will produce healthy, fresh fruit for generations. The tribe speculates that eventually they will need to hire more workers to maintain the fruit orchard and the ever-expanding permaculture garden.

The tribe determined which fruits and vegetables to plant in the permaculture garden by conducting a community survey. This survey also helped the tribe determine which seeds to collect and store for the seed bank. The purpose of the seed bank is to gather the seeds of plants originally grown in the region and preserve them for future generations. The seed bank is a continuing process that will grow as the tribe becomes more and more aware of its needs and learns proper seed-saving techniques.

A portion of this grant was also used to host weekly farmers’ markets that helped farmers and workshop participants sell their fruits and vegetables. These farmers markets are intended to help growers earn extra money and provide tribal members with a healthy alternative to processed foods.

The Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley developed the Sustainable Food System Development Project to improve the physical health and well-being of their people and to preserve their tribal community for generations to come. The success of this innovative field-to-fork model reiterates that tribes have the potential to strengthen and improve their own communities.

By Sarah Hernandez, First Nations Program Coordinator

- See more at: http://indiangiver.firstnations.org/nl140506-01/#sthash.DkuNMPxg.dpuf
The Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley is located on the Big Pine Indian Reservation in California, at the foot of the Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains. The tribe’s early ancestors utilized the land and water to create irrigated areas that produced the tribe’s main food source. However, at the turn of the twentieth century, the city of Los Angeles purchased most of the land and water rights in the Owens Valley and transferred them to the Los Angeles basin, thus severing the tribe’s connection with the land and water and interfering with its ability to feed its own people.

Today, the Big Pine Reservation is considered a “food desert” because of the lack of access to healthy and affordable food. In 2010, the tribe established the Sustainable Food System Development Project to transform its food desert into a more robust, sustainable food system by establishing a permaculture garden.

In 2013, First Nations awarded the Big Pine Paiute Tribe $37,500 through the Native Agriculture and Food Sovereignty Initiative (NAFSI) to expand the permaculture garden to include a demonstration site, a fruit orchard, a seed bank, and a weekly farmers’ market. This grant, underwritten by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, has allowed the tribe to develop an innovative field-to-fork model that will sustain the community for generations to come.

This grant allowed the tribe to expand their small permaculture garden into a larger educational community garden that teaches tribal members how to plant, grow and harvest healthy, organic heirloom fruits and vegetables as well as Native plants and medicine. The tribe used the expanded permaculture garden as a demonstration site to conduct several classes and workshops, including a three-day intensive permaculture course, food policy/sovereignty classes, youth mentoring sessions, and numerous gardening workshops.

The gardening workshops, in particular, have been very popular among tribal members. At these workshops, tribal members learn about composting, caring for plants and respecting ecosystems. Many workshop participants used these lessons to create their own personal home gardens. These workshops encouraged tribal members to start their own gardens while simultaneously attending to the community garden. As a result of these hands-on workshops, tribal members helped plant, grow and harvest more than 100 pounds of squash, cucumbers, tomatoes, green beans and bell peppers that were eventually donated to the tribal grocery store.

Many tribal members also volunteered at the expanded permaculture garden site outside of these workshops. For example, several volunteers helped plant 50 perennial fruit trees. The trees did not yield any fruit this season. However, once these trees mature, they have the potential to yield hundreds of pounds of fruit. These trees will produce healthy, fresh fruit for generations. The tribe speculates that eventually they will need to hire more workers to maintain the fruit orchard and the ever-expanding permaculture garden.

The tribe determined which fruits and vegetables to plant in the permaculture garden by conducting a community survey. This survey also helped the tribe determine which seeds to collect and store for the seed bank. The purpose of the seed bank is to gather the seeds of plants originally grown in the region and preserve them for future generations. The seed bank is a continuing process that will grow as the tribe becomes more and more aware of its needs and learns proper seed-saving techniques.

A portion of this grant was also used to host weekly farmers’ markets that helped farmers and workshop participants sell their fruits and vegetables. These farmers markets are intended to help growers earn extra money and provide tribal members with a healthy alternative to processed foods.

The Big Pine Paiute Tribe of the Owens Valley developed the Sustainable Food System Development Project to improve the physical health and well-being of their people and to preserve their tribal community for generations to come. The success of this innovative field-to-fork model reiterates that tribes have the potential to strengthen and improve their own communities.

By Sarah Hernandez, First Nations Program Coordinator

- See more at: http://indiangiver.firstnations.org/nl140506-01/#sthash.DkuNMPxg.dpuf

 

ELDERS SPEAK...

 

"Prayer is the best answer to all of the trials that face us, because without prayer, even if we succeed in accomplishing some great goal in the eyes of men, we have failed in our sacred responsibilities, and thus we have failed in what is truly important." -- Thomas Yellowtail, Crow

 

What are our sacred responsibilities? One is to be of maximum service to the Creator, and two is to serve the people. In a way, it's like the Great Spirit is the employer and we are the employees. We live each day, do what we do, accomplish our goals, face our difficulties, overcome them all to the Glory of the Creator. We do these things to make Him proud! Even if we work for a company, agency or tribe, they are not really our employer; the Creator is our employer. Working for the Creator is better than working for a human being, because each night we can talk to the Creator and ask Him, "Well, how did I do today?". He answers back each night, "I'm proud of you, my child; sleep well, and in the morning I'll give you a new set of growing experiences.".

 

Great Spirit, today, let me work for you. You will be my new boss.

 

 

Copyright: Coyhis Publishing found in the book, Meditations with Native American Elders: Any republishing of part or all of their contents is prohibited.

 

At Manataka prayer is demonstrating our faith and love.  We teach prayer is as important as breathing. ~Lee Standing Bear Moore 

 


 

SPIRITUALITY

 

Coca, and The Sacred Plants of the Incas - The Shamanic World of the Andes

The Incas regarded coca as "the divine plant" mainly because of its property of imparting endurance, nevertheless its use was entwined with every aspect of life; the art, mythology, culture and economy of the Inca Empire.

Millions of Indians have chewed coca on a daily basis for many hundreds of years, yet never has a plant been so misrepresented and its use so controlled by prejudice and ignorance, including up to the present day. The Conquistadors considered it an idle and offensive habit to be prohibited, but it was soon seen that the Indians could not work without coca even when forced to do so.

The coca leaf has been sacred to Andean people since the dawn of pre-Colombian civilization. Doris Rivera Lenz, a renowned Andean Ceremonialist, healer, and Coca leaf Diviner, when asked about the source of the information she divines from them, she says:  READ MORE....
 

 


 

PROTESTS

 

 

Native Americans: We're not your mascots

By Simon Moya-Smith

 

American Indians and supporters protest before the Minnesota Vikings and Washington Redskins game on November 7, 2013

(CNN) -- I once wondered why we indigenous peoples of North America must break it down when it comes to why something is anti-Native American. On the whole, people can recognize what's anti-black, anti-gay, anti-Latino, anti-Asian, and so on: But when it comes to racism directed at Native Americans, we, the first peoples of this continent, are left having to explain why Indian mascots and painting your face red at a Cleveland Indians game denigrate us. Years of studying and observing this situation have led me to an unfortunate conclusion: People have been conditioned to ignore racism directed at Native Americans. But, I'm not sure I can consciously blame them ... at least not all of them.

Think about it: Thanks to Hollywood, I'm supposed to have long hair, bronze skin and a very limited vocabulary. Courtesy of Thanksgiving and Halloween, it's possible someone might believe it's "just in good fun" to dress in faux Native American garb and play Indian. So when I walk in a room, nobody looks at me and sees a Native American. Why? Because people have been conditioned to believe I look, act, and even talk a certain way, and believe playing Indian is OK.    READ MORE...

 


 

HISTORY & CULTURE

 

PUERTO RICO HISTORY AND THE TAINO PEOPLE
By Roberto Delgado


THE TAINO RACE OF AMERICAN INDIAN PEOPLE IS FAR FROM EXTINCT.


Dr. Juan Martinez Cruzado, a geneticist from the University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez designed an island-wide DNA survey, The study funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation, shows that 61 percent of all Puerto Ricans have Amerindian mitochondrial DNA, 27 percent have African and 12 percent Caucasian. (Nuclear DNA, or the genetic material present in a gene's nucleus, is inherited in equal parts from one's father and mother. Mitochondrial DNA is inherited only from one's mother and does not change or blend with other materials over time.  READ MORE...

 


Chief's Son, 7th Generation, Speaks "NO MORE GMO's!

 


MANATAKA NEWS

 

Please help Manataka today. 

Give a donation or send your 2014 dues.

http://www.manataka.org/page201.html

 

MAIC needs your support now

Help be a part of building the Sacred Grounds at Manataka 

 

Please help Manataka Now!  Over the past 20 years, we seldom asked for help.  We need it now.

 



MEMBER NEWS

Volunteer Counseling Positions Open: 

Are you a minister, psychologist, teacher or counselor?  Elder Robert Gray Hawk Coke announces that more professional volunteer counselors are needed for the Manataka's free online Counseling program helping hundreds of people with emotional, spiritual, family, marital and other issues -- anonymously and free!. There are education, professional experience and licensure requirements. http://www.manataka.org/Counseling.html Email:  counseling@manataka.org

 

Manataka Sacred Grounds project:  

Planning is in full-swing to convert vacant lots on the east side of Manataka (Hot Springs) Mountain into memorial gardens.  Everyone is excited!  http://www.manataka.org/page1392.html


Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
 
Please rescind the so-called "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" regulation.

Turning most poultry inspection over to poultry companies so that they can police themselves is no way to address the rampant food- and workplace-safety problems plaguing this industry.

The proposed rule would decrease the number of USDA inspectors in poultry plants while increasing line speeds by up to 175 birds per minute,
or three birds per second. In order to compensate for missed fecal contamination, the proposed rule would permit companies to use more anti-microbial chemicals to clean the poultry carcasses.

Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. Working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America. This rule will worsen those conditions.

I urge you to withdraw the "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" rule.
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf
Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
 
Please rescind the so-called "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" regulation.

Turning most poultry inspection over to poultry companies so that they can police themselves is no way to address the rampant food- and workplace-safety problems plaguing this industry.

The proposed rule would decrease the number of USDA inspectors in poultry plants while increasing line speeds by up to 175 birds per minute,
or three birds per second. In order to compensate for missed fecal contamination, the proposed rule would permit companies to use more anti-microbial chemicals to clean the poultry carcasses.

Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. Working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America. This rule will worsen those conditions.

I urge you to withdraw the "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" rule.
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf
Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
 
Please rescind the so-called "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" regulation.

Turning most poultry inspection over to poultry companies so that they can police themselves is no way to address the rampant food- and workplace-safety problems plaguing this industry.

The proposed rule would decrease the number of USDA inspectors in poultry plants while increasing line speeds by up to 175 birds per minute,
or three birds per second. In order to compensate for missed fecal contamination, the proposed rule would permit companies to use more anti-microbial chemicals to clean the poultry carcasses.

Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. Working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America. This rule will worsen those conditions.

I urge you to withdraw the "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" rule.
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf
Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
 
Please rescind the so-called "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" regulation.

Turning most poultry inspection over to poultry companies so that they can police themselves is no way to address the rampant food- and workplace-safety problems plaguing this industry.

The proposed rule would decrease the number of USDA inspectors in poultry plants while increasing line speeds by up to 175 birds per minute,
or three birds per second. In order to compensate for missed fecal contamination, the proposed rule would permit companies to use more anti-microbial chemicals to clean the poultry carcasses.

Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. Working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America. This rule will worsen those conditions.

I urge you to withdraw the "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" rule.
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf
Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf

 

Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf
Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf
Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf
Ask the USDA to Rescind Its ‘Filthy Chicken Rule’
Ask the USDA to Rescind Its ‘Filthy Chicken Rule’
Ask the USDA to Rescind Its ‘Filthy Chicken Rule’
Ask the USDA to Rescind Its ‘Filthy Chicken Rule’

GOOD STUFF GRAB BAG

 

 

Manataka's YOUTH Books

 

A Basic Native/Iroquois Reading List

 

Tribal Flags -- 20 New Flags - Find Yours Now


 

ELDERS SPEAK

 

"Without a sacred center, no one knows right from wrong." -- -- Thomas Yellowtail, Crow

 

In the center of the circle is where the powers reside. These powers are called love, principle, justice, spiritual knowledge, life, forgiveness and truth. All these powers reside in the very center of the human being. We access these powers by being still, quieting the mind. If we get confused, emotionally upset, feel resentment, anger, or fear, the best thing we can do is pray to the Great Spirit and ask Him to remove the anger and resentment. By asking Him to remove these obstacles, we are automatically positioned in the sacred center. Only in this way do we know right from wrong.

Great Spirit, allow me this day to live in the sacred center.

Copyright: Coyhis Publishing found in the book, Meditations with Native American Elders: Any republishing of part or all of their contents is prohibited.

 

At Manataka we teach the Center is everything -- the seat of the Creator, the focus of our existence.  Knowledge, wisdom and balance comes from the center of our circle ~Lee Standing Bear Moore

 


 

FEATURE

 

Who Is An Indian?

by Barbara "Shining Woman" Warren

 

No single definition of "Indian" exists - socially, administratively, legislatively or judicially. Currently in the United States 10 to 20 million people may have Indian ancestry, but only a small percentage identify themselves as being primarily Indian.

 

The Bureau of the Census counts anyone an Indian who declares himself or herself to be an Indian. In 1990 the Census figures showed there were 1,959,234 American Indians and Alaska Natives living in the United States (1,878,285 American Indians, 57,152 Eskimos, and 23,797 Aleuts). This is a 37.9 percent increase over the 1980 recorded total of 1,420,000. The increase is attributed to improved census taking and more self-identification during the 1990 count.

 

According to the Bureau of Indian Affairs, no single Federal or tribal criterion establishes a person's identity as an Indian. Government agencies use differing criteria to determine who is an Indian eligible to participate in their programs. Tribes also have varying eligibility criteria for membership. To determine what the criteria might be for agencies or Tribes, one must contact them directly. 

READ MORE....

 

 


 

 

 

WOMEN'S COUNCIL

 

Joanne Shenandoah: Oneida Iroquois, Advocate for Peace

By Abbey Jenkins      

 

 

 

Joanne Shenandoah

Joanne Shenandoah, PhD, is one of America’s most celebrated and critically acclaimed musicians. She is a Grammy Award winner, with over 40 music awards, including a record 13 Native American Music awards and 17 recordings.  She has captured the hearts of audiences all over the world, from North and South America, South Africa, Europe, Australia and Korea, with praise for her work to promote Universal Peace. She is a board member of the Hiawatha Institute for Indigenous Knowledge http://www.hiawatha.syr.edu

 

Joanne and her daughter Leah recorded on the title track “Path to Zero” with Jim Morrison which also included artists, Sting, Bono, Sinead O’Conner, Robert Downey Jr., and others.  They will release 2 new recordings before the end of the year, Leah’s “Spectra” and Joanne’s “Nature Dance”,   her upcoming world music collection which she calls “Evolutionary Native Dance .“ She created and recorded the album with friends from North America, Persia, Spain and Germany.  The music has been composed over the past two decades and is dedicated to fans of Native music across the planet.

 

READ MORE..

 


 

ELDERS SPEAK

 

"We must have respect and understanding for women and all female life on this Earth which bears the sacred gift of life." -- Traditional Circle of Elders. Onondaga

At a gathering of Native Elders we were told that many men of today had lost their ability to look at the Woman in a sacred way. They said we were only looking at Her in a physical sense and had lost the ability to look at Her sacredness. They said the Woman has a powerful position in the Unseen World. She has the special ability to bring forth life. They told us to start showing Her respect and to look upon her in a sacred manner. We must start this today.

Grandfather, show me how to see in a sacred way.

Copyright: Coyhis Publishing found in the book, Meditations with Native American Elders: Any republishing of part or all of their contents is prohibited.

At Manataka we honor all women who we know are sacred. ~Lee Standing Bear Moore

 


 

New! American Indian Flags

 

Take Pride in Your Tribe -- Fly It High!

See 147 Authentic Tribal Flags

 


 


 

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

 

Connecting...

Dear Editor,

 

Yesterday I saw a coyote in the middle of the day. It stared back without moving as it traveled into the wooded area. Didn't think anything about it and continued walking my dogs.  Today (morning, early before the sun), I saw three crows flying above a roof top. We usually do not have crows in this area but I have seen them on occasion in the same area I travel. However, there were three instead of one.   After seeing the crows, a fox crossed my path.
 
I find this unusual because I very seldom see these animals with in a two day period. I maybe have my Great Grandmother's instinct  (a member of the Chippewa Tribe) but I fear (or dread) what is about to come.  I hope you can answer my animal spirit or what ever it is because I have a feeling something is about to happen.
~Diana L. B.

 


 

READ MORE LETTERS TO THE EDITOR - JULY 2014

 

 


 

TIDBITS

 

Wild & Weird: Squirrels Against Selfies
Selfies are a defining mode of expression for a generation reared on smartphones and social media; one British study found that 18- to 24-year-olds take more pictures of themselves than any other single subject.

Critics have argued that this obsession with self-portraits and the lengths to which people will go to snap them -- sometimes putting their reputations or even lives on the line -- is evidence of cultural narcissism and a moral decline from "know thyself" to "show thyself."

We're talking about human critics, of course. But what about the squirrels? In Florida earlier this month, a teen named Brian posed for a selfie alongside a cute squirrel on a handrail. No spoilers here, but what happened next was the stuff of nightmares -- see the pics in The Washington Post.

 


 

EVENTS

 

July 10, 2014. Thursday

“Replacing Fear with Trust: Everyday Applications of the Way of the Heron”

Creative COOP of Rosendale

402 Main Street, Rosendale, NY (Behind Big Cheese) $10 donation

Contact Stacy Lipari (845)527-5672 cbcofrosendale@gmail.com   

 

July 13,  2014  2 p.m. to 4 p.m.

“What is The Red Road in Native American Spirituality? Workshop with Evan Pritchard  

Mirabai Books, 23 Mill Hill Road, Woodstock, NY 12498

(845)679-2100.

 

July 19, 2014 6 PM

“Native American Place Names in Ulster County…” Lecture by Evan Pritchard

Klyne Esopus Museum, 9W Ulster Park, NY.

(845)266-9231

 

July 19th, 2014 One Saturday, 9:00am to 7:00pm -- (8 hours, with 1.5 hour lunch and breaks am & pm)  

July 26, Aug 2, Aug 9 - 3 Saturdays, 10am to 1pm, (Eastern time; 9 hours total)

"Alchemy of Peace: Create Your Personal Power Field" (Level 1 Class)

Location: Horizon Center for Intuitive Awareness 

5549 Roswell Rd, Atlanta, GA 30342  

PRESENTERS:  Dr. Gail Lash & Pam Rennie

   

August 6 - 10, 2014

Drum Building Workshop

International workshop, Sweden

A Chance to come and build your own Shaman Drum,

the same way the old Shamans did ! In cooperation with

The Nature, Power Animals and Spirits!

www.shamandrums.com / www.shamantrommer.dk
 

August 8 - 10, 2014 - various times

12th Natural Healing Arts Fair

Shrine Mosque
601 E. St Louis Street
Springfield, MO 65806

 

September 21, 2014

Workshop in Dance and Shamanism for Women

Through oriental tribal dance you gain insight into ancient techniques /theories and you have the opportunity to experience how your body can be a spiritual tool—a tool which can give you deeper contact with your own and with the collective female primordial force.
Through Shamanic drum travel and guided travelling into the body we will seek knowledge of our own inner resources and origins and we will seek out and try to wake up dormant memories and individual potential.
Read more at:  www.shamandrums.com

 

October 5 - 8, 2014

Bioproducts World Showcase and Conference

Ohio State University

Columbus Hilton Downtown and Columbus Convention Center

BIC, a Bioproducts Innovation Center at The Ohio State University is proud to announce a first-of-its-kind event to accelerate the manufacturing, distribution, and use of bio-based products.  We will bring together procurement officials and commercial buyers with producers of bio-based materials and product manufacturers to facilitate business relationships through the bio-product industry. 

www.bioproductsworld.org

 


 

CROSSING OVER

 

In Memoriam: Farley Mowat, Acclaimed Author and Environmental Champion

 

In early May 2014 we lost a great champion of wildlife, First Nations, and the Arctic with the passing of Canadian author Farley Mowat, 92. During his more than 60 years of writing, Mowat challenged readers to open their hearts to the natural world through moving, funny and often heartwrenching prose describing the beauty of nature and our too-often careless destruction of it.

His first book, "People of the Deer" (1952), chronicled the plight of the Inuit and was based on personal observations Mowat made during a summer in the Canadian Arctic in the 1940s; his most famous book "Never Cry Wolf" (1963), later made into a movie, is widely credited with changing people's views of these beautiful animals.

In 1985 Mowat was denied entry to the United States for a book tour of "Sea of Slaughter," which chronicled the devastating destruction of wildlife along the U.S. and Canadian eastern seaboard. His barring occurred under a McCarthy Era law known as the McCarran-Walter Act, which allowed denial of entry to "communist sympathizers." He challenged the denial and eventually prevailed, all of which was documented in his book "My Discovery of America" (1985), which contributed to the law being amended, although not repealed.

"With his exquisite writing bringing life to the spirit of animals and the natural world, while at the same time chronicling the callousness of our destruction of wildlife for personal gain or out of plain ignorance, Farley Mowat changed my life and the lives of many," said the Center's Noah Greenwald. "Farley's clear voice and humor will be deeply missed."

Learn more in this CBC tribute to Mowat.


 

 

Billy Frank Jr., Nisqually Elder Who Fought for Tribal Rights, Walks On

 

Sad news reported by many media outlets around Indian Country, including Seattle Times. Billy Frank Jr., a Nisqually elder and fisherman who served for more than half a century as the charismatic voice of Northwest tribes fighting for fishing rights, passed away early Monday morning. He was 83.

“We are all stunned and not prepared for this,” said W. Ron Allen, Jamestown S’Klallam tribal chairman, who has worked with Mr. Frank since the early 1980s. “He was bigger than life. It’s a very sad day for all of us.”

 

Mr. Frank was first arrested for salmon fishing as a boy in 1945. He was beaten and jailed repeatedly as he and others staged “fish ins” demanding the right to collect Chinook and other salmon in their historical waters, as guaranteed under treaties when they ceded land to settlers in the 19th century. By the time celebrities like Marlon Brando showed up on the Nisqually River to assist them in 1964, the salmon wars had raged for decades.



POWWOW CALENDAR

 

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JULY

July 3 - 6, 2014

National Powwow XVI

Hendricks County Fairgrounds

Danville, Indiana

Jim Beuoy - powwowbum1@yahoo.com

330-705-8980

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July 4 - 6, 20140

68th Pawnee Veterans Powwow

Pawnee, OK. Black Bear Stadium. .

(918) 873-0499 .   pawneeindianveteransorg@gmail.com

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July 5 - 6, 2014

Monroe Powwow

Sardis. River's Edge Campground. 34396 State Route 7. Inter-tribal event Host drum - Fire River Arena Director - Logan Steele Head Veteran - Shawn Reilly Other staff to be determined .  Jennifer Babb.  740-934-9353. monroepowwow@facebook.com   monroepowwow@gmail.com

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July 11 - 13, 2014

Spirit of the Wolf: Intertribal Powwow

Rte 196, Behind High School, Lisbon Falls, ME

207-478-6846

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July 18 - 20, 2014

Children of Many Colors Powwow

Moorpark. Moorpark College. 7075 Campus Road, Moorpark, CA 93021.

Native American singing, dancing, drumming, flute, Gourd Dancing, Bird Singing, Princess contest, Veterans Honoring, arts, crafts, food and non profit booths, traditional dwellings, a family style intertribal gathering..  Corina Roberts.  805 217 0364. www.RedbirdsVision.org   redbirds_vision@hotmail.com

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Friday, July 18 7:00pm - Sunday, July 20

6th Sacred Visions 2014 Competition Powwow

50 Big Bend Ranch Road, Wadsworth, Nevada 89442

 

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July 19 - 20, 2014

New Hampshire Inter-tribal N. A. Council

Val Ranco Memorial Powwow

Harbor Park, Harbor Rd., Wells, ME

603-651-8769

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July 19 - 20, 2014

Big Indian Powwow

Big Indian Park, Big Indian, NY

On route 28. Gates open at 10 AM, opening ceremony at 11 AM.

Contact Mary Lou at Loulou5782@yahoo.com 

(845) 254-4238. Evan will perform, tell stories, and do book signings.

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July 26 - 28, 2014

Julyamsh Powwow 2014

Post Falls. Greyhound Park . 5100 W. Riverbend Ave.. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe hosts their annual Julyamsh Powwow - the largest outdoor powwow in the Inland Northwest - for three days at the Greyhound Park in Post Falls. The event honors Indian culture with dances, songs, games and spirituality. Join the celebration! .  .  800-523-2464, ext. 7261. http://julyamsh.com/   Bbostwick@cdacasino.com

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July 26 - 27, 2014, 12:00 pm5:00 pm

WildFire Phillips InterTribal Powwow

13 Sharon Drive - Fair Haven, VT 05743

Wildfire Phillips: 802-683-6133
wildfiredebbie@gmail.com
Head Man: Mike "Eaglewolf"; Head Lady: Wildfire Phillips; MC: To Be Announced; Host Drums: Seven Arrows:

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AUGUST

August 02 - 03, 2014

Bear Mountain Powwow

Stony Point. Anthony Wayne Recreation Area at Harriman State Park. Palisades Interstate Parkway, Stony Point, NY 10980. Saturday August 3rd, 11am ? 8pm, Sunday August 4th, 11am ? 7pm Grand Entry of Dancers at 1pm and 4pm Price: $14 Adults & Teens (Plus fees if purchasing online), $8 Children 6-12 years old & Seniors 65+ (Plus fees if purchasing online), No fee for Children 5 years old and under; $8 Parking .  . 718.686.9297 . http://redhawkcouncil.org/powwows/   native@redhawkcouncil.org

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August 06 - 10, 2014

100th Meskwaki Powwow

176 Battleground Road, Tama, Iowa

641-484-4678

Ceremonial Dances. Arts & Exhibits. Two performances Daily

meswakipowwow@gmail.com
meswakipowwow.com

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August 07, 2014 - Tree Day

D Watson  -  Yankton Dakota  'Tiyospaye'  Ceremony
Pipestone Monument, Pipestone, MN

G Drapeau Sr, early advisor; dekshi s... koda s... oyate...la gente...relatives... ungweh howeh...  people...Yanktonai-Dakota prayer-dance-ceremony-fast at Pipestone -- sun dance - Wiwanyang Wacipi Anishnabe relatives - LCO, Hayward, WI

camp set up before or by 08/02/14 Sat  -  until Tues  -  08/12/14
Iniipi/sweats during camp; women's moon camp if needed.
 Ceremony:  08/07 -- 11 /14 (5 days total, Thrs -- Mon)
Clean-up 08/12/14

dakotanomad@yahoo.com

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August 15 - August 17, 2014

Algonquins of Pikwakanagan Annual Powwow

Golden Lake, Ontario, Canada

Corrina Aird: 613 585 7248

Host Drums: Bear Nation Drum
x.o.x_lilnish_x.o.x@hotmail.com
 

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August 31 - 2, 2014, 10:00 am8:00 pm

7th Annual Harvest Moon Powwow

Gallipolis City Park, OH 

Rona Stevens: 740-379-2873
Free Admission, Bring Your Lawn Chairs! Event runs from 10am til Dark Sat & Sun, 10am til 5pm Mon. Enjoy the beauty of the park located right on the OH River! Come one, come all! Event will be held Rain or Shine!***************************************************************

SEPTEMBER

September 13 - 14, 2014

All Nations Benefit Powwow

Susquehanna. PA

The Portal Institute, Inc.. 163 Melrose Avenue. At the foot of the beautiful Appalachian Mountains in Susquehanna, PA there will be an incredible event with good music, good food and good company. Emcee: Quentin Bear. Fuller Arena Director: Bobby Hurt Lead Male: Patrick Littlewolf Brooks; Lead Female: Sparrow Plainbull Jr. Lead Male: Samiakin Redbear; Allen Jr. Lead Female: Rachel Tupponce; Host Drum: Red Blanket Singers Guest Drums: Thundervoice; War Paint & Wild Band; Special Performances by Spirit Winds Eagle Pines Falconry & The Sinquah Family Dancers. Free Parking. Admission includes entry to the museum and art gallery. Dance Arena is covered! Native-made Arts, Crafts, & Food, Music, Storytelling, Intertribal & Exhibition Dancing. Day Money for the first 25 dancers who register! Host Hotel: Holiday Inn Express - Gibson 1561 Oliver Road Exit 219 @ I-81 New Milford, PA Tel: (570) 465-5544 Website: www.hiexgibsonpa.com

 

Mention the 'All Nations Powwow' for a special rate. Proceeds go to support The Belize Fund, an organization that was originally created to help provide education and health services to the children of Belize. The Belize Fund is now working to extend its support to the American Indian community. For more information contact Emelie Jeffries at allnationspowwow2014@gmail.com

Belize Fund: 570- 727-3614 

https://www.facebook.com/events/206597719550638

Emelie Jeffries.  570-727-3614.

http://www.portal-found.com/pow-wow-benefit.html   allnationspowwow2014@gmail.com

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September 26 - 28, 2014

14th Annual Buffalo River Powwow

Linden, Tennessee

Contact: 931-589-9628

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NOVEMBER

November 14-16, 2014

Great American Indian Exposition Powwow

Richmond Raceway, 600 E. Laburnum Ave. 

Richmond, VA

A special ceremony will be held in appreciation of veterans on Saturday and Sunday.  On Saturday, gates will open at 10:00AM (for early shoppers), and the event will kick off with a parade of nations (grand entry) at 12:00 noon.  Over 100 Tribes and over 200 American Indians in regalia (outfits) will be represented at this year’s event, and they include:  Haliwa-Saponi, Pamunkey, Piscataway, Chickahominy, Cherokee, Rappahannock, Sioux, Iroquois, Lumbee, Hopi, Mattaponi, Nansemond, Choctaw, Navajo, and so many other Tribes and nations.  Barry Richardson, at (252) 532-0821 or send e-mail for discount coupon to: powwow@vance.net  

 

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