SMOKE SIGNAL NEWS

APRIL 2014

 

Tuesday, April 22
Earth Day 2014

 


 

WordPress Project VOLUNTEERS:

 

Bob White of Hot Springs, AR has been appointed IT Coordinator for the WordPress project.  Bob is a soft-spoken, highly intelligent computer expert with many years of experience.  If you are a volunteer for the WordPress project, he will be contacting you with specific assignments and instructions. He has already completed much of the back-office ground work and is anxious to get to know each of our wonderful volunteers. Contact us

 

New Web Site:

During a retreat the Elder Council decided to install all new upgraded software and build an entirely new website from ground up.  With over 2,705 web pages and over 10,000 printed pages, this task is huge.  The new website will be accessible by mobile devises and it will have a state-of-the-art shopping experience in the Manataka Trading Post and added security features. This task will take many months to complete but the result will enhance the Manataka experience for everyone.  

 

Volunteers needed to copy and paste web pages into WordPress.  Call 501-627-0555

 


Forbidden fruits create many jams


 

HEALTH WATCH

 

Mother Earth and Stress Relief: 

A New Meaning to Being “Grounded”

by Martin Zucker, Earthing Institute

 

The instant you place your bare feet on the ground outside you establish an electrical contact with the Earth. The Earth beneath your feet, you see, is the equivalent of a six sextillion metric ton battery and little old you are a bioelectrical being.  You may not know it, but like other living animals and plants, your body receives and conducts the natural, subtle frequencies that pulse throughout the surface of our dynamic planet. 

 

What does that mean to you?  More than you ever imagined, as you may have read in the previous articles about Earthing posted in the February and March issues of Smoke Signal News.  Among other implications, the Earth is a stress-buster, and just how much is the subject of this article. 

 

Here’s the background:

Earthing is both a timeless practice and a modern discovery. It simply means living in contact with the Earth’s natural surface charge − being grounded − which naturally discharges and prevents chronic inflammation in the body. This effect has massive health implications because of the strong link between chronic inflammation and virtually all chronic disease, including the diseases of aging, and the aging process itself.   READ MORE...

 

 


 

ELDERS SPEAK

 

Sleeping Grandfather Mountain

"Oh God! Like the Thunderbird of old I shall rise again out of the sea; I shall grab the instruments of the white man's success - his education, his skills, and with these new tools I shall build my race into the proudest segment of your society."

-- Chief Dan George, Salish

 

One thing the Indian people do well is adapt. This is why we survive. We must learn to keep our culture, but also to learn the good things that other races have to offer. Education is the future weapon of Native people. We must learn the legal system, health, science and engineering. Indian people have great contributions to make to the world. We need to educate ourselves so we can better protect the land and our children. Otherwise, we will lose the things and the land that we have.

 

Great Spirit, make me teachable today.

 

Copyright of Coyhis Publishing and can also be found in the book, Meditations with Native American Elders: The Four Seasons at www.coyhispublishing.com.  Any republishing of part or all of their contents is prohibited.

 

At Manataka, we greatly encourage all indigenous people to seek the right tools for building a new world, a well educated, smarter world, conscious of ones inner self in the true Indian way. Giving thanks to the Creator of All Things brings inner peace.  We bless our friends, relatives and those who confuse us with prayer.  There is no judgment of ourselves or others.  ~Lee Standing Bear Moore

 


 

OPINION PAGE 

 

Federal Government Creates Two Classes of American Indians...

Obama Federal Court Dictates Who Can Worship as an American Indian

By Robert Soto, Pastor

 

 

Dear Friends:

 

First and foremost, I want to thank you for your prayers concerning our fight in the Eagle Feather Case. It is your prayers that have helped us in this fight to change laws that discriminate against all our Indian people, whether they belong to a tribe recognized by the Federal Government or a tribe recognized by the state or just for those who belong to neither. This is a battle that is now approaching its eighth year.

 

It all started back on March 11, 2006 when several agents of the Department of Interior came during the morning session of our annual Spring powwow and took pictures and video of all the dancers at our powwow.

 

Then an agent came back in the afternoon to target as many dancers as he could and take away their eagle feathers. In the end, forty-two of our feathers, thirty-six of which were given to me in 1971, were taken away.   READ MORE...

 

 


It's Been Over 100 Years Since An Artist Has Done This In America. About Time Someone Did It Again.

 

http://www.upworthy.com/its-been-over-100-years-since-an-artist-has-done-this-in-america-about-time-someone-did-it-again

 

Submitted by Dr. Terry Zumwalt


 

FEATURE

 

“The Invisible Gift”

by Takatoka

 

While strolling in the quiet darkness after midnight on the sacred Manataka (Hot Springs) Mountain in 1982, the vibration of the trees and all manner of things seemed to speak to Grandfather Lee Standing Bear Moore in a cacophony of movement and sound.  He came to a place used a hundred times in the past for ceremony, so he thought it was a good time and place to offer up prayers and chants to quite the dissonance he felt.   The vibration was strong like a big wind and he felt uneasy.

 

His great-grandfather learned at an early age to feel and hear the vibrations of the stone people and over the next 95 years he honed his ability to interpret the frequency language of natures vibrations for the purpose of diagnosing people in need healing.  Over the years, Grandpa learned to use a variety of stones, each having a unique vibration, to read ailments.  Selecting a stone from the windowsill, he placed one an inch or two away from the body.  He discerned pictures inside the patient's by “listening” for frequencies.

 

He could hear or feel the location, size, weight, consistency, color and a dozen other pictures of the affliction causing pain or suffering for the patient.  Using that valuable information, Grandpa was able to create successful treatments with herbal and mineral medicines to bring balance back into the body.     READ MORE...

 


 

BOOK REVIEW

New Triple Award-Winning Book by Tamarack Song

 

Description

It's easy to imagine yourself transported back to a time when an Elder might have told stories like those in Whispers of the Ancients around a glowing hearth. Thanks to Tamarack Song's storytelling skills, monsters, heroes, and shapeshifters come alive and open a doorway to the mysteries of life. Easily accessible to all ages, this is a book that speaks to each person at his or her own level of comprehension and need. It is as beautiful to read as it is to look at.

Stunning Aboriginal artwork by Moses (Amik) Beaver combines with provocative storytelling to renew, in all their traditional splendor, exceptional legends from around the world. Entertaining, profound, passionate, glorious—these are stories that illustrate and evoke themes common to everyone's life, with an ancient wisdom that helps the listener to cope with today's opportunities for tenderness, grief, passion, and irony.

"Whispers of the Ancients helps us reconnect with the spirit of story that is a part of all our heritages. With respect for the wisdom of the past and with an eye toward the cross-cultural links that legends can make between us, Tamarack Song offers a gathering of tales and insightful comments that point the way back to the circle."
—Joseph Bruchac, author of more than 70 books for children and adults, including (with coauthor Michael J. Caduto) the best-selling
Keepers of the Earth: Native American Stories and Environmental Activities for Children

Tamarack Song has sought out the stories of the North African and Central Asian tribal peoples from whom he is descended, and he has listened to the tales of indigenous people from the tundra to the tropics. His books include Journey to the Ancestral Self, and he has contributed to Lois Einhorn's Forgiveness and Child Abuse. He is also a counselor, wilderness skills teacher, rites-of-passage guide, and founder of the Teaching Drum Outdoor School (www.teachingdrum.org). Song lives in the Nicolet National Forest near Three Lakes, Wisconsin.

Moses (Amik) Beaver is an Ojibwe artist from the isolated fly-in community of Nibinamik (Summer Beaver), Ontario, three hundred miles north of Lake Superior. Grants from the Ontario Arts Council and other sources support his ongoing work with youth, and partial support for this book's illustrations comes from the District School Board of Nibinamik. 

Brother Wolf Foundation website

Praise / Awards

  • "It is a lovely collection of stories... a delight for readers familiar with Native American tales, as well as those new to the genre."
    ForeWord Reviews
  • Nautilus Book Awards 2011 Gold Winner in the Multicultural/Indigenous category
  • Winner of three Midwest Independent Publishers Awards in the categories of Coffee Table Books, Social Studies, and Illustration
- See more at: http://www.press.umich.edu/1642728/whispers_of_the_ancients#sthash.wULm7zOk.dpuf

Description

It's easy to imagine yourself transported back to a time when an Elder might have told stories like those in Whispers of the Ancients around a glowing hearth. Thanks to Tamarack Song's storytelling skills, monsters, heroes, and shapeshifters come alive and open a doorway to the mysteries of life. Easily accessible to all ages, this is a book that speaks to each person at his or her own level of comprehension and need. It is as beautiful to read as it is to look at.

Stunning Aboriginal artwork by Moses (Amik) Beaver combines with provocative storytelling to renew, in all their traditional splendor, exceptional legends from around the world. Entertaining, profound, passionate, glorious—these are stories that illustrate and evoke themes common to everyone's life, with an ancient wisdom that helps the listener to cope with today's opportunities for tenderness, grief, passion, and irony.

"Whispers of the Ancients helps us reconnect with the spirit of story that is a part of all our heritages. With respect for the wisdom of the past and with an eye toward the cross-cultural links that legends can make between us, Tamarack Song offers a gathering of tales and insightful comments that point the way back to the circle."
—Joseph Bruchac, author of more than 70 books for children and adults, including (with coauthor Michael J. Caduto) the best-selling
Keepers of the Earth: Native American Stories and Environmental Activities for Children

Tamarack Song has sought out the stories of the North African and Central Asian tribal peoples from whom he is descended, and he has listened to the tales of indigenous people from the tundra to the tropics. His books include Journey to the Ancestral Self, and he has contributed to Lois Einhorn's Forgiveness and Child Abuse. He is also a counselor, wilderness skills teacher, rites-of-passage guide, and founder of the Teaching Drum Outdoor School (www.teachingdrum.org). Song lives in the Nicolet National Forest near Three Lakes, Wisconsin.

Moses (Amik) Beaver is an Ojibwe artist from the isolated fly-in community of Nibinamik (Summer Beaver), Ontario, three hundred miles north of Lake Superior. Grants from the Ontario Arts Council and other sources support his ongoing work with youth, and partial support for this book's illustrations comes from the District School Board of Nibinamik. 

Brother Wolf Foundation website

Praise / Awards

  • "It is a lovely collection of stories... a delight for readers familiar with Native American tales, as well as those new to the genre."
    ForeWord Reviews
  • Nautilus Book Awards 2011 Gold Winner in the Multicultural/Indigenous category
  • Winner of three Midwest Independent Publishers Awards in the categories of Coffee Table Books, Social Studies, and Illustration
- See more at: http://www.press.umich.edu/1642728/whispers_of_the_ancients#sthash.wULm7zOk.dpuf

Description

It's easy to imagine yourself transported back to a time when an Elder might have told stories like those in Whispers of the Ancients around a glowing hearth. Thanks to Tamarack Song's storytelling skills, monsters, heroes, and shapeshifters come alive and open a doorway to the mysteries of life. Easily accessible to all ages, this is a book that speaks to each person at his or her own level of comprehension and need. It is as beautiful to read as it is to look at.

Stunning Aboriginal artwork by Moses (Amik) Beaver combines with provocative storytelling to renew, in all their traditional splendor, exceptional legends from around the world. Entertaining, profound, passionate, glorious—these are stories that illustrate and evoke themes common to everyone's life, with an ancient wisdom that helps the listener to cope with today's opportunities for tenderness, grief, passion, and irony.

"Whispers of the Ancients helps us reconnect with the spirit of story that is a part of all our heritages. With respect for the wisdom of the past and with an eye toward the cross-cultural links that legends can make between us, Tamarack Song offers a gathering of tales and insightful comments that point the way back to the circle."
—Joseph Bruchac, author of more than 70 books for children and adults, including (with coauthor Michael J. Caduto) the best-selling
Keepers of the Earth: Native American Stories and Environmental Activities for Children

Tamarack Song has sought out the stories of the North African and Central Asian tribal peoples from whom he is descended, and he has listened to the tales of indigenous people from the tundra to the tropics. His books include Journey to the Ancestral Self, and he has contributed to Lois Einhorn's Forgiveness and Child Abuse. He is also a counselor, wilderness skills teacher, rites-of-passage guide, and founder of the Teaching Drum Outdoor School (www.teachingdrum.org). Song lives in the Nicolet National Forest near Three Lakes, Wisconsin.

Moses (Amik) Beaver is an Ojibwe artist from the isolated fly-in community of Nibinamik (Summer Beaver), Ontario, three hundred miles north of Lake Superior. Grants from the Ontario Arts Council and other sources support his ongoing work with youth, and partial support for this book's illustrations comes from the District School Board of Nibinamik. 

Brother Wolf Foundation website

Praise / Awards

  • "It is a lovely collection of stories... a delight for readers familiar with Native American tales, as well as those new to the genre."
    ForeWord Reviews
  • Nautilus Book Awards 2011 Gold Winner in the Multicultural/Indigenous category
  • Winner of three Midwest Independent Publishers Awards in the categories of Coffee Table Books, Social Studies, and Illustration
- See more at: http://www.press.umich.edu/1642728/whispers_of_the_ancients#sthash.wULm7zOk.dpuf

Description

It's easy to imagine yourself transported back to a time when an Elder might have told stories like those in Whispers of the Ancients around a glowing hearth. Thanks to Tamarack Song's storytelling skills, monsters, heroes, and shapeshifters come alive and open a doorway to the mysteries of life. Easily accessible to all ages, this is a book that speaks to each person at his or her own level of comprehension and need. It is as beautiful to read as it is to look at.

Stunning Aboriginal artwork by Moses (Amik) Beaver combines with provocative storytelling to renew, in all their traditional splendor, exceptional legends from around the world. Entertaining, profound, passionate, glorious—these are stories that illustrate and evoke themes common to everyone's life, with an ancient wisdom that helps the listener to cope with today's opportunities for tenderness, grief, passion, and irony.

"Whispers of the Ancients helps us reconnect with the spirit of story that is a part of all our heritages. With respect for the wisdom of the past and with an eye toward the cross-cultural links that legends can make between us, Tamarack Song offers a gathering of tales and insightful comments that point the way back to the circle."
—Joseph Bruchac, author of more than 70 books for children and adults, including (with coauthor Michael J. Caduto) the best-selling
Keepers of the Earth: Native American Stories and Environmental Activities for Children

Tamarack Song has sought out the stories of the North African and Central Asian tribal peoples from whom he is descended, and he has listened to the tales of indigenous people from the tundra to the tropics. His books include Journey to the Ancestral Self, and he has contributed to Lois Einhorn's Forgiveness and Child Abuse. He is also a counselor, wilderness skills teacher, rites-of-passage guide, and founder of the Teaching Drum Outdoor School (www.teachingdrum.org). Song lives in the Nicolet National Forest near Three Lakes, Wisconsin.

Moses (Amik) Beaver is an Ojibwe artist from the isolated fly-in community of Nibinamik (Summer Beaver), Ontario, three hundred miles north of Lake Superior. Grants from the Ontario Arts Council and other sources support his ongoing work with youth, and partial support for this book's illustrations comes from the District School Board of Nibinamik. 

Brother Wolf Foundation website

Praise / Awards

  • "It is a lovely collection of stories... a delight for readers familiar with Native American tales, as well as those new to the genre."
    ForeWord Reviews
  • Nautilus Book Awards 2011 Gold Winner in the Multicultural/Indigenous category
  • Winner of three Midwest Independent Publishers Awards in the categories of Coffee Table Books, Social Studies, and Illustration
- See more at: http://www.press.umich.edu/1642728/whispers_of_the_ancients#sthash.wULm7zOk.dpuf

Description

It's easy to imagine yourself transported back to a time when an Elder might have told stories like those in Whispers of the Ancients around a glowing hearth. Thanks to Tamarack Song's storytelling skills, monsters, heroes, and shapeshifters come alive and open a doorway to the mysteries of life. Easily accessible to all ages, this is a book that speaks to each person at his or her own level of comprehension and need. It is as beautiful to read as it is to look at.

Stunning Aboriginal artwork by Moses (Amik) Beaver combines with provocative storytelling to renew, in all their traditional splendor, exceptional legends from around the world. Entertaining, profound, passionate, glorious—these are stories that illustrate and evoke themes common to everyone's life, with an ancient wisdom that helps the listener to cope with today's opportunities for tenderness, grief, passion, and irony.

"Whispers of the Ancients helps us reconnect with the spirit of story that is a part of all our heritages. With respect for the wisdom of the past and with an eye toward the cross-cultural links that legends can make between us, Tamarack Song offers a gathering of tales and insightful comments that point the way back to the circle."
—Joseph Bruchac, author of more than 70 books for children and adults, including (with coauthor Michael J. Caduto) the best-selling
Keepers of the Earth: Native American Stories and Environmental Activities for Children

Tamarack Song has sought out the stories of the North African and Central Asian tribal peoples from whom he is descended, and he has listened to the tales of indigenous people from the tundra to the tropics. His books include Journey to the Ancestral Self, and he has contributed to Lois Einhorn's Forgiveness and Child Abuse. He is also a counselor, wilderness skills teacher, rites-of-passage guide, and founder of the Teaching Drum Outdoor School (www.teachingdrum.org). Song lives in the Nicolet National Forest near Three Lakes, Wisconsin.

Moses (Amik) Beaver is an Ojibwe artist from the isolated fly-in community of Nibinamik (Summer Beaver), Ontario, three hundred miles north of Lake Superior. Grants from the Ontario Arts Council and other sources support his ongoing work with youth, and partial support for this book's illustrations comes from the District School Board of Nibinamik. 

Brother Wolf Foundation website

Praise / Awards

  • "It is a lovely collection of stories... a delight for readers familiar with Native American tales, as well as those new to the genre."
    ForeWord Reviews
  • Nautilus Book Awards 2011 Gold Winner in the Multicultural/Indigenous category
  • Winner of three Midwest Independent Publishers Awards in the categories of Coffee Table Books, Social Studies, and Illustration
- See more at: http://www.press.umich.edu/1642728/whispers_of_the_ancients#sthash.wULm7zOk.dpuf

Description

It's easy to imagine yourself transported back to a time when an Elder might have told stories like those in Whispers of the Ancients around a glowing hearth. Thanks to Tamarack Song's storytelling skills, monsters, heroes, and shapeshifters come alive and open a doorway to the mysteries of life. Easily accessible to all ages, this is a book that speaks to each person at his or her own level of comprehension and need. It is as beautiful to read as it is to look at.

Stunning Aboriginal artwork by Moses (Amik) Beaver combines with provocative storytelling to renew, in all their traditional splendor, exceptional legends from around the world. Entertaining, profound, passionate, glorious—these are stories that illustrate and evoke themes common to everyone's life, with an ancient wisdom that helps the listener to cope with today's opportunities for tenderness, grief, passion, and irony.

"Whispers of the Ancients helps us reconnect with the spirit of story that is a part of all our heritages. With respect for the wisdom of the past and with an eye toward the cross-cultural links that legends can make between us, Tamarack Song offers a gathering of tales and insightful comments that point the way back to the circle."
—Joseph Bruchac, author of more than 70 books for children and adults, including (with coauthor Michael J. Caduto) the best-selling
Keepers of the Earth: Native American Stories and Environmental Activities for Children

Tamarack Song has sought out the stories of the North African and Central Asian tribal peoples from whom he is descended, and he has listened to the tales of indigenous people from the tundra to the tropics. His books include Journey to the Ancestral Self, and he has contributed to Lois Einhorn's Forgiveness and Child Abuse. He is also a counselor, wilderness skills teacher, rites-of-passage guide, and founder of the Teaching Drum Outdoor School (www.teachingdrum.org). Song lives in the Nicolet National Forest near Three Lakes, Wisconsin.

Moses (Amik) Beaver is an Ojibwe artist from the isolated fly-in community of Nibinamik (Summer Beaver), Ontario, three hundred miles north of Lake Superior. Grants from the Ontario Arts Council and other sources support his ongoing work with youth, and partial support for this book's illustrations comes from the District School Board of Nibinamik. 

Brother Wolf Foundation website

Praise / Awards

  • "It is a lovely collection of stories... a delight for readers familiar with Native American tales, as well as those new to the genre."
    ForeWord Reviews
  • Nautilus Book Awards 2011 Gold Winner in the Multicultural/Indigenous category
  • Winner of three Midwest Independent Publishers Awards in the categories of Coffee Table Books, Social Studies, and Illustration
- See more at: http://www.press.umich.edu/1642728/whispers_of_the_ancients#sthash.wULm7zOk.dpuf

"Whispers of the Ancients helps us reconnect with the spirit of story that is a part of all our heritages. With respect for the wisdom of the past and with an eye toward the cross-cultural links that legends can make between us, Tamarack Song offers a gathering of tales and insightful comments that point the way back to the circle."

Praise / Awards

  • "It is a lovely collection of stories... a delight for readers familiar with Native American tales, as well as those new to the genre."
    ForeWord Reviews
  • Nautilus Book Awards 2011 Gold Winner in the Multicultural/Indigenous category
  • Winner of three Midwest Independent Publishers Awards in the categories of Coffee Table Books, Social Studies, and Illustration
- See more at: http://www.press.umich.edu/1642728/whispers_of_the_ancients#sthash.wULm7zOk.dpuf

 

"Whispers of the Ancients: Native Tales for Teaching & Healing in Our Time" is a triple award-winning, illuminated collection of many Native American wisdom-laden stories, some or most from the traditions of the Lake Superior Ojibwe traditions, also the indigenous culture of accomplished artist Moses (Amik) Beaver. In addition to the magnificent retelling of the collection of stories, "Whispers of the Ancients" contains many special keys and lodestones, guides to the full use and understanding of Native storytelling traditions; many of these are sacred and must be respectfully presented, conveyed, and honored.  READ MORE...

 

Paperback: 224 pages; Publisher: University of Michigan Press/Regional (May 5, 2010); ISBN-13: 978-0472051069; Dimensions: 0.8 x 9 x 11.7 inches  $35.00 + s/h


 

ELDERS SPEAK...

 

"I wanted to feel, smell, hear and see, but not see with my eyes and my mind only. I wanted to see with CANTE ISTA - the eye of the heart."  -- Lame Deer, Lakota

 

Why is it that some people seem to have peace of mind every day? How do some people remain so darn positive? How do you stay positive if you work or live in a negative environment? How is it that two people can observe the same difficult situation, but one person is upset about it, and other isn't? Two people experiencing the same situation react entirely different. If each morning we ask the Creator to allow us to see with His understanding and with His love, we will open a new way of "seeing". This eye of the heart is a free gift given to us if we ask for it in prayer each day.

 

Grandfather, allow me to see the world and all things You have made through "the eye of my heart."

 

Copyright of Coyhis Publishing and can also be found in the book, Meditations with Native American Elders: The Four Seasons at www.coyhispublishing.com.  Any republishing of part or all of their contents is prohibited.

 

At Manataka, we teach many paths to seeing with ones heart and soul.  Seeing the world with an open heart is much easier than reflecting a mirror image of the world.  Opening a new way of seeing is growing blind to the old world. ~Lee Standing Bear Moore

 


 

ARCHEOLOGY

 

Winter Solstice Sunset Ceremonial Serpent Mound

Marco Island, FL Caloosa Indian (Calusa)

 By Ray Urbaniak

 

The Calusa Indians (Caloosa) occupied and ruled primarily the southwest region of present day Florida.  They lived there for thousands of years until their eventual extinction after the arrival of the Spanish.  The Caloosa became famous in 1895-1896 when Frank Hamilton Cushing discovered a hoard of beautifully carved and decorated wooden artifacts preserved in the muck of Key Marco, Marco Island, Florida.

 

When I lived in Florida 30 years ago I did a lot of research on the Caloosa (the present spelling commonly used is Calusa). A friend of mine, Kathy Herring told me about and took me to a shell mound on Marco Island that had Whelk shell terraces.  The story was that a settler by the name of Ernest Otter had built the whelk shell terraces during the 1940’s-1960’s.  The house he built on this Caloosa habitation site eventually burnt down.  I was convinced at that time that the terraces were actually built by the Caloosa Indians, since they were identical to those found on Demory Key off of Pine Island, Florida on Cushing’s expedition.   At that time, I wrote to state officials to preserve the site, but I don’t know if my pleas had any impact. READ MORE...  

 


 

ANIMAL RIGHTS

 

Idaho Intent on Killing 60 percent  Wolves in Wilderness

New Plan Aims to Reduce Population by 60 Percent to Please Elk Hunters

 

POCATELLO, Idaho— In an effort to inflate elk populations for commercial outfitters and hunters, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) hopes to kill 60 percent of the wolves in the Middle Fork area of central Idaho’s Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, according to a predator management plan for the area released this week.

 

IDFG’s plan calls for an intensive program of wolf killing in the largest forested wilderness area in the lower 48 states through several successive years of professional hunting and trapping efforts designed to boost the local elk population beyond the level that can be sustained through natural predator-prey interactions. It comes just weeks after a hunter-trapper hired by the state wildlife agency killed nine wolves in an effort to exterminate two wolf packs in the Middle Fork area. State officials terminated the program in the midst of an emergency court proceeding to halt the program.     READ MORE...

 

 

How Wolves Change Rivers

Sustainable Man
 

When wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the United States after being absent nearly 70 years, the most remarkable "trophic cascade" occurred. What is a trophic cascade and how exactly do wolves change rivers? George Monbiot explains in this movie remix.

 

"When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the Universe." - John Muir

http://www.filmsforaction.org/watch/how-wolves-change-rivers/#.Uv8B4UO1UmB.facebook

 


 

CROSSING OVER

Bobby Onco, Wounded Knee Warrior, Walks On

Gale Courey Toensing 2/10/14

 

Robert Charles Onco, a member of the Kiowa Tribe of Oklahoma and an American Indian Movement activist, passed into the spirit world on January 31 after a long battle with lung cancer. He was 63 years old.

 

Bobby Onco, as he was known, was immortalized in a photo that became a symbol the 1973 uprising at Wounded Knee. The photo shows Onco holding a raised AK-47 and smiling broadly. It became famous worldwide as a poster with the words “Remember Wounded Knee” and is archived in the Library of Congress.

 

The uprising at Wounded Knee—the site of the 1890 massacre of hundreds of men, women and children by the U.S. cavalry—began on February 27, 1973, by Oglala Lakota and AIM activists when approximately 200 Indians seized and occupied the town of Wounded Knee on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. The activists were demanding that the U.S. government make good on broken treaties from the 19th and early 20th centuries. It was the beginning of a 71-day occupation and armed conflict with the United States Marshals Service, FBI agents and other law enforcement agencies, who cordoned off the area. The civil rights direct action inspired Indians from all over the country, attracted worldwide media coverage and widespread public sympathy.

 

Related: A Tour of Wounded Knee: Why It Matters, Why It Hurts

 
Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2014/02/10/bobby-onco-wounded-knee-warrior-walks-153490

 


SPIRITUALITY

Chaplains Group

8,850 members on Linkedin

A response from

Grandfather Lee Standing Bear Moore

 to Linkedin Chaplains and Ministers

 

Theology of Proselytizing

 

Proselytizing is to convert or attempt to convert (someone) from one religion, belief, or opinion to another.  Used as a verb, Proselytize is defined to try to persuade people to join a religion, cause, or group.  It refers to the attempt of any religion or religious individuals to convert people to their beliefs, or any attempt to convert people to a different point of view, religious or not. Proselytism is illegal in some countries.  Some of the religions that actively proselytize are Bahá'í Faith, Christianity and Buddhism.  Some of the religions that do not actively proselytize are Hinduism, Jainism, Sikhism, Islam, Judaism.  Read how Lee Standing Bear answers other chaplains.

 

Chaplain Ty Alday, MDiv, BCC   Chief Operating Officer at The Association of Professional Conservative Chaplains www.apcchaplains.org

Is there a difference between proselytizing and witnessing as a Christian Chaplain if the definition of proselytizing is to "convert someone to your particular religion"?

Craig Cassatt - Church planting

As a Christian (whether a chaplain or not) we are to witness and proselytize but we do not try to convert anyone to any religion; our sole responsibility is to point men to Christ.   READ MORE...



MANATAKA NEWS

 

Please help Manataka today. 

Give a donation or send your 2014 dues.

http://www.manataka.org/page201.html

 

MAIC needs your support now

Help be a part of building the Sacred Grounds at Manataka 

 

Please help Manataka Now!  Over the past 20 years, we seldom asked for help.  We need it now.

 


 

ENVIRONMENT

 

Five Native Plants to Add to Your Garden

from Wildlife Promise  By David Mizejewski

 

Spring will be here before you know it. Gardeners everywhere are itching to get outside and start planting. As you’re planning your garden and waiting for the weather to warm up, consider including a few (more) native plants. They’re the best choice when it comes to creating a wildlife-friendly garden, and the good thing is that there are many beautiful natives commercially available.

 

I asked Peggy Anne Montgomery of the American Beauties Native Plants for some recommendations. Here are five of her favorite native wildflowers for wildlife.

 

Swamp Milkweed

Asclepias incarnata
 

This lovely milkweed offers nectar for butterflies and hummingbirds

and is host plant for monarch butterflies caterpillars.

 

READ MORE...

 

 

 


MEMBER NEWS

Volunteer Counseling Positions Open: 

Are you a minister, psychologist, teacher or counselor?  Elder Robert Gray Hawk Coke announces that more professional volunteer counselors are needed for the Manataka's free online Counseling program helping hundreds of people with emotional, spiritual, family, marital and other issues -- anonymously and free!. There are education, professional experience and licensure requirements. http://www.manataka.org/Counseling.html Email:  counseling@manataka.org

 

Manataka Sacred Grounds project:  

Planning is in full-swing to convert vacant lots on the east side of Manataka (Hot Springs) Mountain into memorial gardens.  Everyone is excited!  http://www.manataka.org/page1392.html


Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
 
Please rescind the so-called "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" regulation.

Turning most poultry inspection over to poultry companies so that they can police themselves is no way to address the rampant food- and workplace-safety problems plaguing this industry.

The proposed rule would decrease the number of USDA inspectors in poultry plants while increasing line speeds by up to 175 birds per minute,
or three birds per second. In order to compensate for missed fecal contamination, the proposed rule would permit companies to use more anti-microbial chemicals to clean the poultry carcasses.

Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. Working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America. This rule will worsen those conditions.

I urge you to withdraw the "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" rule.
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf
Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
 
Please rescind the so-called "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" regulation.

Turning most poultry inspection over to poultry companies so that they can police themselves is no way to address the rampant food- and workplace-safety problems plaguing this industry.

The proposed rule would decrease the number of USDA inspectors in poultry plants while increasing line speeds by up to 175 birds per minute,
or three birds per second. In order to compensate for missed fecal contamination, the proposed rule would permit companies to use more anti-microbial chemicals to clean the poultry carcasses.

Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. Working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America. This rule will worsen those conditions.

I urge you to withdraw the "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" rule.
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf
Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
 
Please rescind the so-called "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" regulation.

Turning most poultry inspection over to poultry companies so that they can police themselves is no way to address the rampant food- and workplace-safety problems plaguing this industry.

The proposed rule would decrease the number of USDA inspectors in poultry plants while increasing line speeds by up to 175 birds per minute,
or three birds per second. In order to compensate for missed fecal contamination, the proposed rule would permit companies to use more anti-microbial chemicals to clean the poultry carcasses.

Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. Working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America. This rule will worsen those conditions.

I urge you to withdraw the "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" rule.
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf
Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
 
Please rescind the so-called "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" regulation.

Turning most poultry inspection over to poultry companies so that they can police themselves is no way to address the rampant food- and workplace-safety problems plaguing this industry.

The proposed rule would decrease the number of USDA inspectors in poultry plants while increasing line speeds by up to 175 birds per minute,
or three birds per second. In order to compensate for missed fecal contamination, the proposed rule would permit companies to use more anti-microbial chemicals to clean the poultry carcasses.

Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. Working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America. This rule will worsen those conditions.

I urge you to withdraw the "Modernization of Poultry Slaughter Inspection" rule.
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf
Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf

 

Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf
Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf
Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports
So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 
Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

 
Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.

 
Potentially harmful bacteria lurks in almost all U.S. chicken. That’s according to a recent Consumer Reports survey that found, “More than half of the samples contained fecal contaminants. And about half of them harbored at least one bacterium that was resistant to three or more commonly prescribed antibiotics.”

 
Yet if the USDA gets its way, the few government inspectors left would have to inspect three birds per second. Inspect? They’d be whizzing by so fast they’d hardly see them!

 
We could also call the USDA’s new plan the “Dead Inspector Rule.” With breakneck line speeds at slaughterhouses, poultry processing plants are turning to toxic, bacteria-killing chemicals to remove contaminants that escape notice. These chemicals can be deadly. Plant inspectors and workers exposed to chemicals like chlorine and parecetic acid complain of respiratory problems. Many cough up blood. Some experience lung hemorrhage and, at least one has died of lung and kidney failure. 

 
Or maybe we should call it the “Injured Worker Rule.” As editors at the Charlotte Observer, Raleigh News Observer, Bellingham Herald and Gaston Gazette have pointed out, faster line speeds mean more injuries.
 
If you’ve eaten chicken anytime since 1998, you may have already eaten food from slaughterhouses operating under the USDA’s proposed “Filthy Chicken Rule.” Tyson has been piloting the plan at some of its poultry plants for years. According to a Government Accountability Office report, under the pilot program, “sorting responsibilities [removing unsafe birds from production] on the slaughter line [were] not required or standardized and faster line speeds allowed under the pilot projects raise[d] concerns about food safety and worker safety.”

 

It’s time to tell President Obama and Secretary Vilsack to protect consumers and workers by abandoning their "Filthy Chicken Rule.”
- See more at: http://salsa3.salsalabs.com/o/50865/p/dia/action3/common/public/index?action_KEY=13222&start=25#sthash.060mSHc5.dpuf
Ask the USDA to Rescind Its ‘Filthy Chicken Rule’
Ask the USDA to Rescind Its ‘Filthy Chicken Rule’
Ask the USDA to Rescind Its ‘Filthy Chicken Rule’
Ask the USDA to Rescind Its ‘Filthy Chicken Rule’

Ask the USDA to Rescind Its ‘Filthy Chicken Rule’

 

Poultry is already the most deadly source of food borne illness. And working in a slaughterhouse is already the most dangerous job in America, according to some reports. 

 

So what is the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) plan to protect consumers and workers? It wants to privatize poultry inspection, putting companies in charge of their own inspections, and then increase the slaughtering line speed. In other words, the USDA’s new “plan” will put both consumers and workers at greater risk.

 

Please sign our petition, asking the USDA to rescind what Food & Water Watch has dubbed the “Filthy Chicken Rule.” 

Food & Water Watch calls the USDA’s plan the “Filthy Chicken Rule,” because the plan almost guarantees higher levels of contaminants in slaughtered birds. First, by drastically reducing the number of government inspectors. And second, by increasing the line speeds from 140 birds to 175 birds per minute.   READ MORE...

 

 


 

GOOD STUFF GRAB BAG

 

 

Manataka's YOUTH Books

 

A Basic Native/Iroquois Reading List

 

Tribal Flags -- 20 New Flags - Find Yours Now


 

ELDERS SPEAK

 

The Old Man said,`you are both ugly and handsome and you must accept your ugliness as well as your handsomeness in order to really accept yourself."  -- Larry P. Aitken, Chippewa

 

My Grandfather told me one time that any person who is judgmental to another is also judgmental to themselves. If we want to be free of being judgmental, we need to first work on how judgmental we are to ourselves. If we quit judging ourselves and start accepting ourselves as we are, we will start accepting others as they are. Then we will experience a level of new freedom.  

 

Great Spirit, let me accept myself as I am - honoring both my strengths and my weaknesses.

 

Copyright of Coyhis Publishing and can also be found in the book, Meditations with Native American Elders: The Four Seasons at www.coyhispublishing.com 

Any republishing of part or all of their contents is prohibited.

 

At Manataka we do not teach the "love yourself first" ideology of today because it encourages judgment of others and actually creates low self esteem.  Loving yourself is not possible if you do not love others first.  Love is not self-centered, but starts with giving to others,  Instead, we teach the Gifting Way that loves unconditionally and does not demand love in return.  The Gifting Way is giving oneself wholly to the family, clan, tribe and nation.  That builds Oneness among all people.  ~Lee Standing Bear Moore

 


 

WOMEN'S COUNCIL

 

Miss Indian Nations XXI: An interview with Alexandria Alvarez

Interview by Dr. Dawn Karima, Contributing Editor, www.Powwows.com

 

Q)  Congratulations! You are truly a lovely Miss Indian Nations! Please tell us about yourself? What do you want us to know about you?

 

A)  My name is Alexandria Brooke Alvarez, I am Miss Indian Nations XXI, I am 26 years-old, and I graduated from Haskell Indian Nations University with an Associate in Liberal Arts, and a Bachelor of Arts in American Indian Studies. I completed two internships in the Washington Internships for Native Students (WINS) with Social Security in the Office of Civil Rights and Equal Opportunity, and then at the Environmental Protection Agency in the American Indian Environmental Office.

 

I currently work at the Sho-Ban News, our tribal newspaper, and was attending Idaho State University for the last two years, but this past fall I decided to take a year off so that I may put my whole heart into being Miss Indian Nations.   READ MORE...

 

 


 

HEALTH WATCH

 

 

Resisting the Truth:

What the FDA Knew (and Hid) About Antibiotics in Animal Feed

By Dr. Mercola

 

 

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has been repeatedly (and rightfully) accused of ignoring the elephant in the room when it comes to antibiotic-resistant disease, namely factory farming practices where antibiotics are routinely fed to animals to promote growth.

 

According to the landmark “Antibiotic Resistance Threat Report” published by the CDC in October 2013, two million American adults and children become infected with antibiotic-resistant bacteria each year, and at least 23,000 of them die as a direct result of those infections. Even more die from complications.  

A recent article in Rodale Magazine highlights what the FDA knew, and hid, about antibiotics in animal feed, thereby allowing the problem to persist and grow unchecked:

“The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has known for more than a dozen years that use of antibiotics in factory farms is harmful to humans, yet the agency has taken no meaningful action to stem their use.

 

READ MORE...


Beautiful Words

 

We Follow the Trail

by Irma Sheppard

 

We follow the Trail

hallowed by tears and blood

of those true to One Heart,

hallowed by the Creator's own Footprint.

 

We ride and we tread lightly,

to not erase the power and the sorrow

of their plight, but to harmonize

those efforts, those losses

with forgiveness

in order to realize God's True Intent.

 

With eyes of kindness for all,

we offer ourselves utterly

in Beloved God's service.

 

 Submitted by Jill English


Acknowledgement of Country

From Beads-on-One-String

http://www.beadsononestring.org/

 

 We acknowledge the traditional custodians of the land

where we are now gathered, and recognize that it

continues to be sacred to them. We hail them: as

 the guardians of the earth and all the things that grow and

 breed in the soil; as trustees of the waters (the seas,

 the streams and rivers, the ponds and the lakes) and

the rich variety of life in those waters.

We thank them for passing this heritage to every

people since the Dreamtime.

We acknowledge the wrongs done to them by

 newcomers to this land and we seek to be partners

 with them in righting these wrongs and in living

 together in peace and harmony.

 

Submitted by Jill English


 

Comfort and prosperity have never enriched the world as much as adversity. Out of pain and problems have come the sweetest songs, and the most gripping stories and beautiful results.  
 


 

New! American Indian Flags

 

Take Pride in Your Tribe -- Fly It High!

See 147 Authentic Tribal Flags

 


 


 

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

 

Hello Manataka,

 

I have one question regarding the medicine wheel.  I have seen some references that say some versions of the medicine wheel attribute specific gifts to each race on the wheel.  One reference was from the Ojibwe.  Are you aware of or have any references from legitimate sources that give some detail on these teachings?  Thanks again.  ~Howard Brass

 

Hello Howard,

According to Grandfather Lee Standing Bear of Manataka:  “...Wheel-walkers can attribute any value they wish to various sections or individual parts of the wheel... Those attributes and value assignments change continually according to the Wheel-walker, the current circumstance and time...  The Wheel is a vast blackboard, or blank canvas whereupon concerns and desires may be expressed or inquiries made... The Wheel is a device that shows relationships between any given variables in the great circle of life...”   Lee Standing Bear Moore, 1979

 

READ MORE LETTERS TO THE EDITOR - APRIL 2014...
 


 

EVENTS

 

30th Annual Arco Iris Spring Caminata

 

 

 

Honoring our Sacred 4 Corners here in the Ozarks

April 19, 2014   12:00 Noon

 

Join with community members walking the beautiful 400 acre Wild Magnolia land trust. Come spend intentional time honoring our Mother Earth and Reconnect with nature. We will visit our 3 sacred sites at Wild Magnolia and also visit our La Hadra Pavilion and Kitchen at the La Salsa Campground.  On April 20, D’Coda, from the Herbal Coaching Community, will conduct a full day workshop on Goldenseal. Camping is available if you’d like to stay the overnight to attend the workshop from 9am-6pm. Workshop fee: $75. See www.herbalcoachingcommunity.com for details.  Directions: From the Buffalo River Bridge on Hwy. 21 in Boxley Valley, turn right at the first road off of Cave Mountain Road and follow the signs. Pot luck community meal will follow the prayer walk at the new Pavilion. Please bring food to share. Bring drinking water and wear appropriate hiking clothes and shoes.

 

 For more information and directions:

(870) 861- 5080   silverwolfe10@gmail.com

 


 

 

 

Baker Creek Festivals

Heritage Day Festival

Sundays, April to October

Spring Planting Festival

May 4 and 5

Baker Creek Farm

2278 Baker Creek Road

Mansfield, MO  65704

www.rareseeds.com/spring-planting-festival

seeds@rareseeds.com

417-924-3031


 

 

2nd Annual Native Food Sovereignty Summit April 14-17, 2014

Registration is now open for the Native Food Sovereignty Summit at Radisson Hotel & Conference Center in Green Bay, Wisconsin.

 

Last year's conference was fully booked and got rave reviews, so register early to ensure you have a seat at this one. Once again, it is proudly co-sponsored by the Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin, First Nations Development Institute, the Intertribal Agriculture Council and Northeast Wisconsin Technical College.  http://indiangiver.firstnations.org/nl140102-03/

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Strawberry Moon Women's Gathering  You are invited to attend and participate in the Strawberry Moon in New Hampshire in June 2014 The Strawberry Moon is a Women’s gathering and it is at this gathering that the women “step up” in tribal status.  All young girls who have received their Moon-time, but have not yet been honored as women would be honored as such during this gathering.  Grandmother Nupa Maka - nupamaka@yahoo.com

 

 


 

Blending Lifestyle, Business and the Environment
 

Aspen Eco Fest 2014

 

5th annual Aspen Eco Fest

June 7th-June 8th.

Downtown Aspen, CO

www.AspenEcoFest.com

Shae@AspenEcoFest.com

 


 

 

BIC, a Bioproducts Innovation Center at The Ohio State University is proud to announce a first-of-its-kind event to accelerate the manufacturing, distribution, and use of biobased products.
 

Bioproducts World Showcase and Conference
 

We will bring together procurement officials and commercial buyers with producers of biobased materials and product manufacturers to facilitate business relationships through the bioproduct industry. 

 

Columbus Hilton Downtown and Columbus Convention Center

If you are involved in the bioproducts industry in any way, this is a must attend event.
www.bioproductsworld.org

 

 



POWWOW CALENDAR

 

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Dance for the Children Gourd Dance

April 01, 2014

Jim Thorpe Multicultural Center, OU Campus, Norman, OK

Corey Still - 918-822-4421
Head Man: Eli Rhoades; Head Lady: Marjorie Tahbone,

Miss Indian World; MC: Warren Queton;

Host Drums: Nick Wahpepah

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Cherokee Of Georgia Spring Pow Wow 2012

April 5 - 7, 2012

Harley RedHawk -  904-446-7223
Head Man: Jamie Nemeth; Head Lady: Lesia Sammis;

MC: Tye Bell; Host Drums: Red Bird Singers

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MSU AIC 37th Annual Powwow

April 6 - 7, 2012

Bozeman, MT

Ronald LodgePole & Jim Burns  -  406-580-4144
Head Man: Spur Roundstone; Head Lady: Marianne Addison;

MC: Ruben Littlehead||||Ray Champ
Host Drums: Northern Cree

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44th Annual Idaho State University Spring Powwow

April 19, 2014 to April 20, 2014

ISU Reed Gymnasium

936 Martin Luther King Drive; Building 45

Pocatello  Idaho  83209

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15 Annual Intertribal Gathering (Contest Powwow)

June 13-15, 2014

Fort Robinson State Park

Crawford, NE 69339

Theme: Honoring People through dance, drum and song.

A family event open to the public.

Contact Chuck Karpf 308-623-1311 for info.

Venders contact HarmonyStar Straub on Face Book

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40th Annual UCO Spring Contest Powwow

April 01, 2014

100 N. University Drive, Edmond, OK  

Lindsay D. Echols - 405-974-3588
Head Woman: Rebecca Roberts;

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Red Mesa HS 2012 Benefit Competition Powwow

April 6 - 7, 2014

Hwy 160 Mile Post 448, Red Mesa, AZ

Hobie  -  928-656-4190
Head Man: Picked Per Session; Head Lady: Picked Per Session

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Chambers Farm Family Spring Powwow

April 6 - 8, 2012, 12:00 am
Chambers Farm, 22400 NW Hwy 315, Ft. McCoy, FL

Michael Brill  -  513-464-1746
http://chambersfarm.org
Head Man: Terrell Anquoe; Head Lady: Michelle Anquoe
MC: Rick Bird; Host Drums: Billy Evans Horse
Other Drums: Birdchopper||||Lords of the Plains

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Easter Powwow

April 6 - 8, 2012

99 Great Plains Road, Arapahoe, WY

Claudette C. Bearing  -  307-840-4185
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El Camino College 14th Annual Powwow - Cancelled

April 7 - 8, 2014

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