Volume XIX  Issue 10

SMOKE SIGNAL NEWS

Preserving The Past Today For Tomorrow

OCTOBER 2012


SIGN UP FREE

THE SMOKE SIGNAL NEWS

Scroll down to the simple form


 

Manataka Elder Council Member Crosses Over

 

 

Daniel HOFFMAN Sr. 73, of Springfield, IL, passed away peacefully in his sleep Friday, September 21, 2012 at his residence.  Daniel was born on July 3, 1939 in Springfield, the son of Joseph and Ida Etheridge Hoffman. He married Carol LeSeure Feb., 27, 1972.

 

He had worked for Barnaby Dental Lab and Paul Davis Dentist Office as a Dental Tech, Daniel then became a Deputy for the Sangamon County Sheriff's Department, Retiring from the Sangamon County Civil Division. He was a member of the Jehovah's Witness Kingdom Hall.

 

He was preceded in death by two Brothers; Joe and Tom Hoffman and 1 sister, Mary Hoffman.

 

He is survived by his wife, Carol Hoffman of Springfield; his son, Daniel (Laurel) Hoffman Jr. of FL; Two granddaughters, Cambri (James) Cooper and Brittney Hoffman, both of FL; 2 sisters Barbara Bartnick and Annie (Ron) Walsh, both of Springfield; Three Brothers, Mike (Sharron) Hoffman of FL, Paul (Karen) Hoffman of Washington, and Richard (June) Hoffman of New Hampshire; Ex-wife, Margaret Parks of Springfield; Several great grandchildren, nieces, nephews and cousins.

 

Daniel Hawk With Seven Eyes Hoffman, is retired law enforcement officer, grandfather, and teacher. He is a founding member of the Taylorville Black Horse Powwow, Inc,' a nonprofit charitable and educational organization. He has given presentations at schools in Central Illinois area on the history, culture and religious beliefs of the Native American people for over 28 years. Hawk and members of his group present dance demonstrations for students, teachers and parents who are also invited to dance. Hawk believes children are the future.

 

Hawk Hoffman became a member of the Manataka American Indian Council 1999 and was elected to the Elder Council in 2008.  He served as chairman of the event committee and was a favorite contributor of articles to the Smoke Signal News.  His sage advise and beautiful demeanor were valued greatly by other council members, volunteers and members of Manataka.

 

Hawk is not only a highly respected elder among his own people, but his love and concern for all people, all life and things of the Earth Mother is legendary and word of his good works has spread across the country. Hawk is a plain spoken man that is not timid about sharing his many years of wisdom and good advise.

 

Memorial Services will be at 4:00 p.m. Monday, September 24, 2012 at Jehovah's Witness Kingdom Hall, 4800 Old Jacksonville Rd., Springfield, Illinois.  No flowers or memorial contributions requested.   Ellinger-Kunz & Park Funeral Home, 530 N. 5th Street, Springfield, IL 62702 is charge of arrangements.

 

Memorial Services will be held at Manataka when Fred Blackhorse Dubay arrives from IL to conduct ceremonies.

 


 

FEATURE STORY

 

Hummingbird Medicine

By Takatoka

 

In numerous cultures, the hummingbird has powerful spiritual significance. These magical beings are most often viewed as a symbol of joy, happiness and love and come to awaken us to the beauty of the present moment.  Many people develop a mysterious bond with this tiny creature.

 

About ten years ago, just before his 104th birthday, Grandfather Aduvir, the last  Tiger Dancer of the Quechua people in the Andes of Peru sent a magnificent necklace made of the huayruro macho beans and carved birds to Lee Standing Bear Moore at Manataka.   According to Aduvir, the hummingbird is a symbol of resurrection. This is because each hummer becomes lifeless and seems to die on cold nights, but it comes back to life again when the miraculous sunrise brings warmth.

 

The hummingbird is the creature that opens the heart.  Read More...

 


 

YOU ARE INVITED!

 

 

www.MomentHotSprings.com

 

Register FREE Now

Gather at the Train Depot / Farmer's Market

 


BOOK REVIEW - INTERVIEW:

 

The 13th Step: Peyote Ceremony Cured Author’s Addictions

By Jordan Wright, Indian Country Today Media Network
 

By the time Robert Hayward, Winnebago, decided to write about his journey to redemption, he had been through hell. His résumé read like a psych report—drug dealer, addict and full-blown alcoholic. After 26 years of self-destruction he found that his physical health had evaporated, his mind had melted, and his relationships with his parents, wife and three kids were on a fast track to nowhere.

 

But he emerged, intact, to write The Thirteenth Step: One Man’s Odyssey of Recovery (Native Son Publishers, Inc., 2011).

 

What makes this revelatory book so compelling is Hayward’s honesty and heartfelt sincerity, coupled with his admission of failure and his decision to turn to tribal wisdom to heal. It is an intriguing insight into the Native American Church’s peyote cleansing rituals, yet a cautionary tale to all substance abusers. Though the church’s practice of using peyote as a sacrament in its ceremonies is legal for tribal members (under the American Indian Religious Freedom Act Amendments of 1994), it is still controversial and has been fraught with negative connotations since the 1960s, when it was used experimentally by the counterculture.

 

To this day there are very few members permitted to conduct this sacred religious ritual, and they are referred to as roadmen. During the lengthy, cabalistic event, Hayward experienced powerful revelations. Eventually, with the trust and guidance of the church’s leaders, he was granted permission to reveal the ceremony to the world and give his profoundly personal account.   Read More...

 

 


 

ELDER MEDITATION

 

"So don't be afraid. What we left behind, leave it back there. Try to do some good. Let's try to take a step, try to think something good."  -- Wallace Black Elk, Lakota

 

Every day is a new day. Sometimes we make mistakes. We do not need to carry these mistakes along with us. Take the lessons and leave the mistakes behind. Look forward to today. Today we can do something good. Today we can have good thoughts. Today we can think kind, uplifting thoughts about ourselves. Today I will think good about ...

 

My Creator, today I ask You to direct my thoughts.

 


 

FEATURE STORY

 

Monday, October 8, 2012. Columbus Day

 

Celebrate Columbus Day?

Hell NO!

 

"Columbus started off not knowing where he was going and upon his arrival, did not know where he was. When he returned to Europe, he did not know where he had been -- and, he did it all on borrowed money." ~Author Unknown

 

Was Christopher Columbus the first to 'discover' North America? Absolutely not. There were millions of indigenous people here eons before Europeans stumbled on this continent. Asians, Africans and people from the Middle East probably came centuries before Erickson or Columbus. Contrary to almost every school textbook, Columbus did not prove the world is round. This fact was proved centuries before Columbus was born.

 

A short time after Columbus' arrival in the Caribbean, he began enslaving and slaughtering thousands indigenous people. In the name of God, church and greed millions of people needless died during the ensuing period of 'discovery' and colonization. The Roman Catholic Church issued the Papal Bull of 1493 giving permission to the kings of Europe to rape, pillage, slaughter and steal property. The Papal Bull became a legal precedent known as the The Doctrine of Discovery the spawned hundreds of new laws used by discoverers, colonists and later by the U.S. government to justify forced confiscation of personal property. (see Native America, Discovered and Conquered)

Read More...

 

 

FEATURE STORY

 

 

Adapt to Climate Change, NOW

By Terri Hansen

 

Mother Earth is in for a destructive ride into the future, according to the full report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released this week called “Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation,” or SREX for short. Tribal nations and Indigenous Peoples, who generate fewer greenhouse emissions than any other group, could be among communities hit the hardest.

 

After 220 scientists from 62 countries finalized the report in Uganda last fall, the IPCC published a 19-page Summary to give policy makers tools ahead of the COP18 in Qatar this November to shape adaptation strategies to extreme weather events. A three-page fact sheet makes the technical report even easier to digest.

 

And digest you should.   Read More...

 

 


 

FEATURE STORY


Tonto Mania

—Who Are We’z Anyways?

 

Do you think Wes Studi would make a good Tonto? He made a good Apache. Hell, as Magua he made a good Huron/Mohawk, I never was clear what tribe he was supposed to be from, but he sure was bad ass and ugly. Even while he and Russell Means were busy killing other Indians he charged our imaginations about ourselves. Was that the right message? Not one peep from the Indian movie image police. Indianicide? Indianicide wants me, lord I can’t go back there. Well, anyway.

 

I read a blog earlier and the owner of the blog said she was pissed that Johnny Depp is playing Tonto because she did not believe he was Indian enough for that particular role, what ever the heck that means. The blogger guesses that Tonto was/is Apache and the whole Apache nation should have been consulted about the role, who should play it and what that actor should wear so as to project the right “image” in a politically correct way so as not to make restless the, er, ah, well, Natives. The blogger basically expressed, I am Native and I am restless over this affront to our good nature and reputation. Read More...

 


 

RECENT STORIES

 

CULTURE

Activism is Taking Over  - September 2012

All My Relations  - July 2012

Controversial Indian Symbols on U.S. State Flags - August 2012

Foundation Helps Native American Students  - September 2012

Maintaining Culture Is Not an Act of Violence  - August 2012

The Yamassee Indians  - July 2012

 

ECOLOGY

Jewelweed Earns its Name   - September 2012

Still Fighting the Toxic Giant - August 2012

 

FEATURES

Clearing Spaces, Clearing Vibration - September 2012

First Tongue: An Ancient Global Language  - August 2012

Mermaid Tales From Native Tribes Abound  - August 2012

Our Children's Future - September 2012

U. S. Forest Service Vandalize Native American Site - Sept. 2012

HISTORY

LIES - Teachers Tell Us About Columbus  - June 2012

Return of the Bird Tribes  - June 2012

Rescuing the Daughter of the Sun from the Underworld - Sept. 2012

 

ELDERS SPEAK

Borrowing, Lending and Gifts  - September 2012

How High Do Eagles Fly?  - September 2012

 

SPIRITUALITY

Conscious Being - Part III - May 2012

Dreams on the Sacred Mountain... - February 2012

How an Indigenous Tribe Changed a Missionaries Views - June 2012

Manataka Sacred Grounds Being Developed   - July 2012

Practical Ways to Raise Your Consciousness in 2012  - January 2012

Reconciliation, Part II  - May 2012

Sweat Lodge Prayers  - July 2012

The Holy Mother of Manataka - January 2012

What Does A Spiritual Awakening Feel Like?  - August 2012


FEATURE STORY

 

The Power of the World Works In Circles

By Sarah Shahriari

 

You have noticed that everything an Indian does is in a circle, and that is because the power of the world always works in circles, and everything tries to be round. In the old days all our power came to us from the sacred hoop of the nation and so long as the hoop was unbroken the people flourished. – Black Elk, from the book Black Elk Speaks.

 

Dallas Arcand creating a hoop ladder

Eleven, twelve, thirteen hoops weave around Dallas Arcand’s arms and legs as he keeps time to a drumbeat. He makes birds, flowers and buffalo spring around his body as the hoops join, separate and link together again in fantastic shapes that transform the man into whatever being he chooses. Then he brings down the house with a one-handed cartwheel over a rolling hoop.

 

“I can’t even understand how he did some of those moves,” said Jocy Bird, Dakota Sioux/Mandan/Hidatsa, one of five judges who named Arcand the winner of the 22nd Annaul Heard Museum Hoop Dance Championship in Arizona this year.

 

Hoop’s popularity is on the rise and dancers are continually innovating with new steps and formations. Performed at powwows across North America and dance showcases aimed at Native and non-Native audiences around the world, the dance wows crowds everywhere.

 

At the annual Heard Museum competition dancers are judged on precision, timing/rhythm, showmanship, creativeness and speed. They pick up the rings, which are often made of light plastic tubing, one by one with their feet while keeping time to a drumbeat. Then dancers work the hoops around their bodies, bringing them into tight balls before fanning the hoops out into forms that speak clearly about nature and unity without using a single word.    Read More...

 


 

FEATURE STORY


Mohawk Haircut A Current Rage

 

Painting by John Thomas

NASA’s ‘Mohawk Guy’ and 18 Other Famous Hairstyle Appropriators

From Indian Country Today Media Network

 

The Curiosity, NASA’s latest Mars rover, touched down on the Red Planet on August 6, and what was a pretty gee-whiz moment for science fans soon flared into a game of Who’s That Guy?

 

“That Guy” was a NASA control-room knob-twiddler wearing a mohawk haircut, and since nobody knew who he was, he became “Mohawk Guy.” Now, Mohawk Guy, real name Bobak Ferdowsi, is the nerd heartthrob who threatens to become a bigger story than the Curiosity.

 

So mainstream America has decided the Mohawk is cool again. But does this hairstyle, other than its name, have anything to do with Mohawk Indians anymore? We asked Ray Cook, Mohawk, ICTMN’s opinions editor, who told us the traditional warrior’s hairstyle is better described as a “scalp lock.” “The Mohawk is known as scalp lock because it makes it very hard for an enemy to lift one’s hair for a trophy,” he says. “But, on a practical note—we are a woodland people, bugs and ticks like to hide in lots of hair, a scalp-lock frustrates them too.” Cook points to the paintings of Mohawk artist John Thomas as illustrations of the pre-Colonial Mohawk scalp lock.  Read More...

 


 

EDUCATION


2013 CALENDARS

 


Since the 1800s, Native American Plains tribes have gathered for powwows to celebrate their rich heritage. the tradition continues with emphasis on spiritual and competitive dances. Photographer Chris roberts shares the tradition through photographs. POWWOW 2013 captures the energy of powwow dancers who proudly preserve their ancestral traditions. 11 x 28 inches open
Regular Price $14.95 SKU:900871-2   Ships in June.  

2013 Ghost Dance Calendar

2013 Powwow Youth Calendar


 


 

ELDER MEDITATIONS

 

"The honor of the people lies in the moccasin tracks of the woman. Walk the good road.... Be dutiful, respectful, gentle and modest my daughter... Be strong with the warm, strong heart of the earth. No people goes down until their women are weak and dishonored, or dead upon the ground. Be strong and sing the strength of the Great Powers within you, all around you."  --Village Wise Man, Sioux

 

The Elders say the Native American women will lead the healing among the tribes. We need to especially pray for our women, and ask the Creator to bless them and give them strength. Inside them are the powers of love and strength given by the Moon and the Earth. When everyone else gives up, it is the women who sings the songs of strength. She is the backbone of the people. So, to our women we say, sing your songs of strength; pray for your special powers; keep our people strong; be respectful, gentle and modest.

 

Oh, Great One, bless our women. Make them strong today.

 



FEATURE STORY

 

Tracing American Indian Ancestry

 

The U.S. Department of the Interior has a webpage dedicated to offering helpful tips and information on tracing Native American ancestry.  The Trace Indian Ancestry page has seven subsections including Ancestry, Genealogical Research, Enrollment Process, Benefits & Services Provided to American Indians and Alaska Natives, Cherokee Indian Ancestry, Dawes Rolls and Contacting a Tribal Entity – The BIA Tribal Leaders Directory. 

 

The Ancestry section describes how genealogical documentation is needed for tribal enrollment and that the Bureau of Indian Affairs does not conduct genealogy research for individuals.  Read More...

 


 

VENDOR

 

Esther Pearson's

TURQUOISE TREASURERS

Bracelets Only $10 each! Your Choice! Necklaces Earrings

Clearance Sale -- only $10.00 each! -- Your Choice -- Dozens more to select

turquoisetreasurers@gmail.com

 


 

FUNNY BONES

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

CP 687- NATIVE PLANTS NATIVE HEALING: Traditional Muskogee Way By Tis Mal Crow
This book is a must for beginners and serious students of herbs and of Native American ways.

This set of herbal teachings draws from the Muscogee tradition, presents an understanding of the healing

nature of plants for the first time in book form and examines common wild plants in a clear and authoritative style explains how to identify, honor, select, and prepare them for use. Illustrated and indexed by plant name and medical topic. New Lower Price!! Was $16.95 Now Only $ 14.95 + s/h 

 

 


 

HERBAL MEDICINE

 

Miracle of Honey and Cinnamon

Honey is the only food on the planet that will not spoil or rot. What it will do is what some call 'turning to sugar'. In reality, honey is always honey. However, when left in a cool dark place for a long time it will "crystallize". When this happens loosen the lid, boil some water and sit the honey container in the hot water, but turn off the heat and let it liquefy naturally. It is then as good as it ever was. Never boil honey or put it in a microwave. This will kill the enzymes in the honey.

Drug companies won't like this one getting around. Facts on Honey and Cinnamon: It is found that a mixture of honey and Cinnamon cures most diseases. Honey is produced in most of the countries of the world. Scientists of today also accept honey as a 'Ram Ban' (very  effective) medicine for all kinds of diseases. Honey can be used without side effects for any kind of diseases. Today's science says that even though  honey is sweet, when it is taken in the right dosage as a medicine, it does not harm even diabetic patients. Weekly World News, a magazine in  Canada, in its issue dated 17 January,1995 has given the following list of diseases that can be cured by honey and cinnamon, as researched by western scientists: 
Read More...

 


 

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR- SOUND OFF!

 

 

Help 3-month old Wade Smith

 

To my Brothers and Sisters in the Native American Community:

 

This is an unusual letter in that I have never sent one like this before. I am asking for help for one of our smallest members. Wade (Wes) Smith is the son of Chief Mel Charlton-Smith and Mike Two Wolves Smith—a Tribal Council member. Wes is 5 years old and was born with Williams Syndrome and with only one hand. He has had numerous health problems during his short life including heart surgery at age 3 months. Last Thanksgiving, Wes was rushed to the hospital and diagnosed with acute kidney failure. After months of treatment and repeated hospitalizations, his kidneys have all but completely failed. He will shortly begin dialysis (rough on any 5 year old) and the prognosis is not good unless he has a kidney transplant. Even with insurance, a kidney transplant is a very expensive proposition and Mel and Mike need all the help they can get. In order to fund this transplant, Mel and Mike have established a fundraising campaign in Wes’ honor with HelpHOPELive, a nonprofit organization that has been

working with the transplant community for nearly 30 years.

 

If you can make a donation—or if you can help with fundraising, you can learn more by visiting Wes’ fundraising page. Go to www.helphopelive.org and type Wade Smith in the "Find a Patient" section on the home page. This will give you more information about Wes and show you the many ways you can help to give this dear child a future. Thank you for your consideration. September 17, 2012

 

Wayne Gray Owl Appleton, Ph.D. Principal Chief

Appalachian American Indians of West Virginia

Office of the Principal Chief

8959 Union Ridge Road

Lesage, WV 25537

 

20 More Letters to the Editor


 

 

Journey to Chief Crazy Horse National Monument, South Dakota

 

Darryl Grey Grey Eagle Brown, a member of the Choctaw Nation from Hugo, Oklahoma and his family journeyed to the Chief Crazy Horse National Monument in South Dakota in September to perform the Honoring the Circle ceremony.  Grey Eagle shares photos and his own words in this brief diary:

 

Greetings All My Relations,

 

Many relatives came together in the beginning of this vision, to Create this wonderful event. We were truly Honored that the amazing family who are creating the largest monument in the United States accepted us and allowed us to come together for this time at this awesome site in South Dakota.

 

Many prayers were answered along the way and as we gathered and offered tobacco in respect of our time and the powerful energy and spirit of this place. We are so thankful for the many elders, leaders, children, artists, and relatives of all four colors that attended.  It was a great day and a sign that we are all working together to bring the Light of Peace to this place and beyond," said Grey Eagle.   Read More...

 


VIDEO CLIPS

 

DAKOTA 38 - Full Movie in HD

 

Great Videos

 


 

Manataka Sacred Grounds Being Developed
 

It is our prayer to one day add an American Indian museum on these grounds.

It is our prayer that problems with the National Park Service will cease to exist.

It is our prayer that people of all nations will come to Manataka to give thanks

To the Creator of All Things

 

As we hike the trails of Manataka Mountain today, we find no monuments to the gentle people who were once the keepers of Manataka (Place of Peace). Only the Grandfathers now tell the story of the Rainbow Woman who blessed and guarded the Valley and the healing waters of Nówâ-sa-lon, the hot springs.

But this is about to change. On the southeast slope of Manataka (Hot Springs) Mountain, cross the street from Hot Springs National Park, there was a small house built in 1920 that was demolished in 2010. This little house sat on a half-acre, three city lots, of sacred ground; a little piece of the sacred mountain.  Read More...

 


 

BOOK REVIEW

 

Listen To The Wind by Tom Haley

A magnificent collection of American Indian poems, prayers and wisdom by a new member of Manataka, Reverend Tom Haley, pastor of the Rock Creek Christian Church in Hot Springs National Park, Arkansas.  Rev. Haley is a graduate of Hendrix College and Perkins School of Theology, Southern Methodist University. He has written a number of books including God and Son, Inc (2012), The Laughing Jesus: and His Other Faces (2012); Along the Path: Meditations and Reflections on Life (2012); Haley's Comments (1991); Prayers with Wings (1985); and Anchors in the Storm (1983).  He and his wife, Amanda, have three adult children and three grandchildren. His newest book shares the beautiful depth and breadth of American Indian wisdom. Listen To The Wind is only $10.00 and proceeds from this book go to the Manataka American Indian Council.  Buy Now!

 

 

 

ELDERS SPEAK

 

Blessed are the Merciful

by Dr. Fred Wilcoxson

 

 

No person among us desires any other reward for performing a brave and worthy action, but the consciousness of having served his nation. ~Joseph Brant ‘Thayendanegea’ Mohawk

The following is just one of thousands of stories about first responders who on a daily basis risk their lives to come to the aid of those in need. I believe that it is as important to remember and to pray for the safety and health of our troops at home and abroad, and all of the first responders from Police, Fire, EMS, Public Services, and Clergy who serve us twenty-four hours a day seven days a week.

 

On the afternoon of November 21, 2008, a tanker filled with propane gas overturned on I-80 at the mouth of Parleys Canyon spilling its contents. When paramedics and fire crews arrived they found the driver alive but trapped in the vehicle.  Read More...

 

 


 

ELDERS SPEAK

 

The Legacy

By Grandmother L.Cota Nupa Maka

 

 

When my mother and father passed into spirit in 1985 it was a dark time in my life. Living on the East Coast and them on the West, we had only been together twice in 25 years. We had however written and called each other but that was not somehow the same as a face to face hug and visit. Or one of those good old fashion gatherings of the clan around a holiday meal with music, dancing, and singing.

 

The words from an old ballad of the three Mary’s of Scotland, come to my mind as I sit here thinking of the space and time that has elapsed.

 

“Little did my Mother think when first she cradled me, the lands I was to travel in and the death I was to die.”

 

We never know what will happen or when we will meet again from the time of separation, be it a day, or many years. The years passed after that and faded into distant memory. The longing for home that was at first so sharp and painful, also passed in time, as I made Maine my second home. I came to be at peace with the rugged coast line and the cold Atlantic waters. The trees that filled the land for miles and miles with no break they went on forever. Lakes and lush green fields separated with the ever present stone walls. I came to find a connection with the land and the animals along with the healing plants that I found there.  Read More..

 

 


 

PRAYER BASKET

 

 

 

 

ILLNESS and ACCIDENTS

 

John "Baz" Guy, Gleneagle, Australia.  A few weeks ago Baz complained of a persistent sore throat.  Two different types of antibiotics did no good.  After tests last week, we found out last Thursday that Baz has cancer in his left tonsils. He came home yesterday and we are going to local doc's now to get CT scans to begin his treatment. Probably tonsils out and chemo + radiation ... Not sure yet. Prognosis pretty good as the doc hasn't been able to detect any nodes. Baz pretty chirpy about it all and we are determined to see him through this in a good way.  Your love & prayers for Baz speedy recovery are gratefully received.  ~Lynn Smith 08-2-12

 

Helen RedWing Vinson, Memphis, TN did not have good news from the foot doctor.  Foot is severely infected and where bones moved to the right from the toe amputation it has caused bone infection again plus the open wound leg and foot wrapped to the knee.. She goes back in a week to see if antibiotics worked if not may be in hospital for a while and right side of foot be gone.  ~Bear 08-21-12

 

Dwayne Stewart, Lawrenceburg, TN used to set up at powwows in middle Tennessee and his wife makes the best fry bread that can be found. He had a blockage and his Intestines ruptured and bile went into the body cavity and they cleaned it up and cut out part of his intestines. He has a Colostomy bag. They have NO Insurance.  Donations can be mailed to Cathy Stewart
470 Chief Creek Road, Lawrenceburg, TN. 38464  
Cathy-931-242-4275

We are asking everyone to say a prayer for "Darkhorse" 3rd Battalion 5th Marines and their families. They are fighting it out in Afghanistan & they have lost 9 marines in 4 days. IT WOULD BE NICE TO SEE the message spread if more could pass it on. Nothing in the media about these guys because no one seems to care:  Justin Allen, 23; Brett Linley, 29; Matthew Weikert, 29; Justus Bartett, 27; Dave Santos, 21; Chase Stanley, 21; Jesse Reed, 26; Matthew Johnson, 21; Zachary Fisher, 24; Brandon King, 23; Christopher Goeke, 23; Sheldon Tate, 27.  All are Marines who gave their lives for YOU this week. Please Honor THEM by forwarding this. Semper Fi ("Always faithful.")  I just did.  ~Helen Vinson  07-26-12

 

My oldest sister Anna Beasley, 85-years old had to be put in for emergency surgery this morning due to “several” blockages in her arteries. She is in University Hospital in Augusta, GA. Nat her husband, Sandy and Gary, daughter and Son in law are there with her. Please pray that all will go well... either way. I know she would rather just go on to Heaven than go into an operating room. Red Wing  05-31-12

 

Elder Rose Marie Pleasants Barron.  Hospitalized in Hot Springs.  Rosetta Pleasants' Aunt, friend of the Batts family and hundreds of other friends and family.   I ask that you pray for her.  ~Cheryl L. Batts, B.A.
 

Manataka Elder, 76-year old Grandfather Jimmie A. Looking For Wind Keefauver, recently underwent hospitalization for a serious blood disease and infections and is recovering at home.  Jimmie appears to be doing much better now.  We are offering up prayers for our revered friend and honored elder.

 

CROSSED OVER

 

Wilcoxson, Freda Hope (88). of Longwood, FL passed away at her home on October 4, 2012 surrounded by her loved ones. She was preceded in death by her loving husband William I. Wilcoxson.  She is survived by her son The Reverend Dr. Fred Wilcoxson, PHD., (JoAnn), of Clermont, her daughter Roberta Pletsch of Longwood, and her sister Phyllis Burk of Pawhuska, OK. She had seven grandchildren, fifteen great-children and 1 great-great grandchild. Born in Eldorado KS on September 1, 1924, she lived most of her life in Oklahoma and Illinois before retiring to Florida with her husband in 1977. As a lover of all things creative, she enjoyed crafting, painting, sewing, cooking, decorating, and transforming ordinary objects into things of beauty. She was a devoted and caring wife, mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, and a wonderful friend and neighbor who will be missed by all who knew her. A memorial Service will be held at the Episcopal Church of the Messiah, 260 North Woodland St., Winter Garden, FL 34787, 407-656-3212, October 15, 2012 at 4:00 PM.

 

Daniel HOFFMAN Sr. 73, of Springfield, IL, passed away peacefully in his sleep Friday, September 21, 2012 at his residence.  Daniel was born on July 3, 1939 in Springfield, the son of Joseph and Ida Etheridge Hoffman. He married Carol LeSeure Feb., 27, 1972.  He had worked for Barnaby Dental Lab and Paul Davis Dentist Office as a Dental Tech, Daniel then became a Deputy for the Sangamon County Sheriff's Department, Retiring from the Sangamon County Civil Division. He was a member of the Jehovah's Witness Kingdom Hall.  He was preceded in death by two Brothers; Joe and Tom Hoffman and 1 sister, Mary Hoffman.  He is survived by his wife, Carol Hoffman of Springfield; his son, Daniel (Laurel) Hoffman Jr. of FL; Two granddaughters, Cambri (James) Cooper and Brittney Hoffman, both of FL; 2 sisters Barbara Bartnick and Annie (Ron) Walsh, both of Springfield; Three Brothers, Mike (Sharron) Hoffman of FL, Paul (Karen) Hoffman of Washington, and Richard (June) Hoffman of New Hampshire; Ex-wife, Margaret Parks of Springfield; Several great grandchildren, nieces, nephews and cousins. Daniel Hawk With Seven Eyes Hoffman, is retired law enforcement officer, grandfather, and teacher. He is a founding member of the Taylorville Black Horse Powwow, Inc,' a nonprofit charitable and educational organization. He has given presentations at schools in Central Illinois area on the history, culture and religious beliefs of the Native American people for over 28 years. Hawk and members of his group present dance demonstrations for students, teachers and parents who are also invited to dance. Hawk believes children are the future.

 

Hawk Hoffman became a member of the Manataka American Indian Council 1999 and was elected to the Elder Council in 2008.  He served as chairman of the event committee and was a favorite contributor of articles to the Smoke Signal News.  His sage advise and beautiful demeanor were valued greatly by other council members, volunteers and members of Manataka.  Hawk is not only a highly respected elder among his own people, but his love and concern for all people, all life and things of the Earth Mother is legendary and word of his good works has spread across the country. Hawk is a plain spoken man that is not timid about sharing his many years of wisdom and good advise.   Memorial Services will be at 4:00 p.m. Monday, September 24, 2012 at Jehovah's Witness Kingdom Hall, 4800 Old Jacksonville Rd., Springfield, Illinois.  No flowers or memorial contributions requested.   Ellinger-Kunz & Park Funeral Home, 530 N. 5th Street, Springfield, IL 62702 is charge of arrangements.   Memorial Services will be held at Manataka when Fred Blackhorse Dubay arrives from IL to conduct ceremonies.

 

Jess Green Chickasaw Nation Attorney 270x364 Chickasaw Nation Lawyer, Judge Walks On at 59Jess Green, an attorney and citizen of the Chickasaw Nation, who dedicated his life to advocating for Native American people lost his battle with neuroendocrine carcinoma on September 8, 2012. He was 59. He was born September 21, 1952 to in Ada, Oklahoma to J. L. and Mary Jo Green and graduated from McLish High School in Fittstown, Oklahoma in 1970. In 1974, he graduated with honors from East Central University in Ada, Oklahoma and in 1977 he received his Juris Doctorate from the University of Oklahoma School of Law. Green’s law career spanned more than 30 years. He served in the first Chickasaw legislature and was legislative chairman while also serving as Pontotoc County Associate District Judge. Soon after the passage of the Indian Child Welfare Act in 1978, Green started the first juvenile court with the Comanche Tribe. Green argued in the Tenth Circuit Court in the MegaMania case and the Seneca-Cayuga case, both of which led to Class II gaming as it is known today in Oklahoma. His experience also includes eight years as a state district court judge, he served as a tribal court prosecutor, a tribal court trial judge, and chief justice of a tribal supreme court. Green was honored with a number of awards throughout his career including being inducted into the Chickasaw Nation Hall of Fame in 2011 and was given a National Indian Gaming Association Lifetime Achievement Award this year. Green is survived by his wife, Nancy McAlister Green of Ada; parents, J. L. and Mary Jo Thomas Green of Ada; daughter, Destiny Jade Green of Austin, Texas; son, Judd Lawrence Green of Ada; stepdaughter, Charity Risner of Ada; granddaughter, Nixie Eppler of Ada; grandson, Van Risner of Ada; sister, Melissa Green Wilkerson and her husband, Richard, of Sunshine; sister-in-law, Sharon McAlister of Henryetta; brother-in-law, Gerald McAlister and his wife, Doreen, of Ada; brother-in-law, Jerry McAlister of Oklahoma City; niece, Keisha Sweeney Factor and her husband, Terry, of Ada; niece, Kristin Barbour of Ada; niece, Kandi Stuckey and her husband, Matt, of Edmond; nephew, Jeff McAlister of Ada; niece, Natalie Richards of Ada; nephew, Jerry Richards of Tribbey; niece, Amy Drescher and husband, John, of Ada; special “Mom,” Georgia Stewart of Fittstown; special “brother,” Jimmy Don Barlow of Tulsa; lifetime friends Steve Gregory, Ron Davidson, David Hatton and Eddie Easterling; numerous aunts, uncles, cousins, in-laws and friends. Services were held Wednesday, September 10 at Chickasaw Nation Community Center in Ada, Oklahoma.

Stanley R. Crooks, the longtime chairman of the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community and a renowned Indian country leader, passed away on Saturday, August 25.  Philip Baker-Shenk, an attorney with the firm Holland and Knight, notified Indian Country Today Media Network of the chairman’s passing late Saturday. Crooks had endured a long respiratory illness that turned acute in the last several weeks, Baker-Shenk said. “Stan was a dear friend. And a tireless defender of tribal sovereignty. And a huge patron of so many good causes and a giant mentor for so many good people in Indian country. Original giants like Chairman Stanley Crooks can never be replaced; at best they can only be copied,” Shenk said.

 

Maj. William R. Fredenberg of the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin walked on July 21. He was a retired United States Air Force veteran and a distinguished member of the tribe. “On behalf of the Menominee Indian Tribe, I extend to Major Fredenberg’s wife Elizabeth and to his children our heartfelt sympathy. We also express our deepest appreciation for his extraordinary service to our country. His continuous acts of bravery in the face of adversity will forever remain symbolic of a Menominee warrior,” Craig Corn, tribal chairman, said upon learning of his death according to a Menominee press release.  Fredenberg, who enlisted in the Army Air Corps in 1942, went to Europe where he was assigned to a fighter-bomber squadron, flying bombing missions following his graduation from flight training. He was shot down over France and taken prisoner during his 27th mission on June 17, 1944. He led a successful escape of 13 prisoners, joining the Free French in sabotaging and attacking the enemy.  Fredenberg returned to Europe in October 1944 and was discharged in 1945 after receiving the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal with two oak leaf clusters.  But for Fredenberg, his service time wasn’t over. In 1950 he re-entered the Air Force and was sent to Japan. After three years, he returned to the United States and became an instructor pilot only to head back into combat during the Vietnam War.

According to the press release, “[o]n August 2 and 3, 1966, he distinguished himself by extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight as an AC-47 Gunship pilot near Pleiku Air Base [, Vietnam]. For his courage, skill and resolute determination, he received his second Distinguished Flying Cross. He retired from active duty in 1969 having been awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross with two oak leaf clusters and the Air Medal with 15 oak leaf clusters.”  A memorial services was held for Fredenberg on August 18th.

 

Agnes Dill, a renowned educator and lifelong proponent of American Indian rights passed away March 17. She was 98.

Edging close to a century of life, Dill filled many of those years working for causes close to her heart. In May 2010, she received an honorary doctorate from the University of New Mexico. In recent years she was recognized as a Santa Fe Living Treasure.

Dill, Isleta/Laguna Pueblo, was born on June 23, 1913 to an Isleta mother and Laguna father. As a child she spent time on both pueblos prior to attending Albuquerque Indian School. Recognizing the value in a good education at a young age, she went on to earn her Bachelor of Arts degree in English and art history from New Mexico Highlands University in 1937. She spent the early years of her career teaching at Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) schools in Oklahoma.  Meanwhile, Dill met and married her Isleta Pueblo husband, Clarence. The couple settled in Vinita, Oklahoma, where they operated a museum and trading post for nearly 20 years. When her husband grew ill from emphysema, the couple returned to their ancestral home on the Isleta Pueblo in 1965.

Clarence passed away five years later. She was a founding member of the North American Indian Women’s Association (NAIWA) and served as the president from 1973-75. In 1975, President Gerald Ford appointed her to the National Advisory Council on Women’s Education. She traveled the country to set up job and talent banks to encourage both Native and non-Native women to pursue career paths considered non-traditional at the time, such as in medicine, law and business.  Dill continued to find avenues to both serve and socialize. The Chamiza Foundation of Sante Fe appointed her as one of their lifetime directors, and she was an active member of the Council of Elders at the University of New Mexico Geriatric Education Center. Dill was laid to rest next to her husband at the Santa Fe National Cemetery.

 

Me Yoti Ndongu, Elder, Great Medicine Woman Dearest Dabadi Thaayrohyadi`s Family. Dear Relatives from the Otomi Toltec Indian Nation, Indigenous Peoples and Human Family. Sisters and Brothers from the Four Directions.  Greetings from the Otomi Indian Nation. The Otomi Elders and Wisdom Keepers from the Olmec Toltec Teotihuacan Lineage share this message from our hearts. Our People and Communities express our consternation and deepest sorrow for the death of Me Yoti Ndongu, Elder, Great Medicine Woman, impeccable and beloved Granma, guide and wisdom keeper. She was Mother of Our Dabadi Thaayrohyadi, beloved Toltec Master, Spiritual Leader and Medicine Man who was doing a Long Pilgrimage to the Native Nations and Spiritual Communities in the Eagle and Condor Lands in order to share our message and invitation to everybody for coming and attending the 8,000 Sacred Drums Ceremony & the Great Gathering for the Healing of the Earth, Peace and Happiness that will take place next september 2012, in Temoaya, Mexico. And he must to come back to our Sacred Lands for attending the funeral of her Mother. We express him our sincere condolences and to his extended family and relatives.  Last Friday afternoon August 3, 2012 Me Yoti Ndongu stopped beating the drum of her heart. She was a mother of eight, she left an example of unconditional love, service and compassion, so we joined our prayers for the release of his spirit eagle, in harmony and peace with the Universe and the Great Mystery. We also continue sending healing energy to the relatives and closer friends who feel sadness in their hearts. This Sunday August 4th, Thaayrohyadi`s Mother, Me Yoti Ndongu was guarded and surrounded with prayers in a overnight ceremony in the family`s house. We thank everyone for your meditations and prayers, for your compassion, for you moral and spiritual support to our Otomi Toltec Indian Nation. We welcome your expressions of condolences and support to Dabadi Thaayrohyadi`s Family, to the Community and to the Otomi Toltec Elders and Wisdom Keepers toltec.elders@gmail.com

 

Disclaimer, Trademark and Copyright Information


Material appearing here is distributed without profit or monetary gain to those who have expressed an interest in viewing the material for research and educational purposes.  This is in accordance with Title 17 U. S. C. section 107. Reprinted under the Fair Use doctrine of international copyright law.
http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html  Non-profit/Teaching/Educational

 

©2012 ManatakaTM American Indian Council.  The word "Manataka" is a registered trademark exclusively owned by the Manataka American Indian Council.  Use of this trademark without the expressed written permission of MAIC is prohibited and violators will be prosecuted. 15 U.S.C. Section 1051(a), (b).  The Smoke Signal News is copyrighted in its entirety and no reproduction, republishing, copying, or distribution is permitted without the expressed written permission of MAIC is strictly prohibited and violations will be prosecuted.

 

 


 

EMAIL          HOME          INDEX          TRADING POST