Manataka American Indian Council


 

 

 

 





 

HEALTH OF NATIVE PEOPLE OF NORTH AMERICA:

AN ANNOTATED MEDIAGRAPHY

by Sharon A. Gray, M.L.S. and Edward R. Starr,Ph.D., M.A.
October, 2006

 

 


Finding information on Native American health is a difficult task.   Searching indexes and databases for the more easily accessible sources such as books and journal articles can provide some information, but by  no means provides comprehensive coverage. The fugitive literature contains much useful information for this subject, but lack of indexing presents a formidable barrier to identifying relevant materials.  Audiovisual materials are not always well indexed, but provide a unique type of information. They are especially valuable for the education of  health professionals who have Native patients and for the education of Native people who are patients. The narrative or story format often used  in these productions is the cultural preference of Native people for conveying information or teaching.

The purpose of this mediagraphy is to provide as comprehensive a listing  as possible of the current audiovisual materials on native health that exist in the United States and Canada.

One of the reasons that audiovisuals are less accessible is that most  are not produced and marketed by large commercial operations. Most are produced by agencies, organizations and small publishers. They may be produced for a specific purpose, such as health education. Marketing of these materials is limited or nonexistent. Consequently, references do not appear in the usual databases and indexes, thereby limiting access.

This listing of audiovisual materials will be published by the authors next year as a chapter in a comprehensive reference book of resources on American Indian health. Scarecrow Press has granted permission for this section to be published in this journal prior to its inclusion in the larger work. The authors would very much appreciate any reactions to its content, especially regarding the identification of references that may have been unintentionally overlooked.

References cover the period from 1970 to the present and are arranged alphabetically by title. The Addiction Research Foundation (ADR), a major research organization in Canada, ranks the quality of videos in its collection on a six-point scale. The ADR rating of quality, when available, is included at the end of the annotations. Every attempt has been made to include as much information about the audiovisuals as is available. In some cases, a piece of information, such as date, may not have been known. Where possible, the audiovisual was viewed in order to prepare an original annotation. A list of addresses of producers and distributors is appended.

 

 


 

HEALTH FILMS

"AIDS: American Indians Dying Silently." VHS, New Mexico Health and Environment Department, AIDS Prevention Program. The video provides an overview of the HIV epidemic among Native Americans featuring a Native American television reporter and a tribal official from New Mexico.

"AIDS and the Native American Family." VHS, 11 min. 1990. Upstream Productions, Seattle, Washington. The purpose of the program is prevention through education. A Native American man tells his wife that he has AIDS. She is pregnant and finds out that she is HIV-positive. The three HIV transmission modes are discussed, and the importance of a strong family and treating the spiritual is emphasized.
 

"Alcohol and the Unborn Baby." 45 slides, 10 min. White Mountain Apache Tribe, White River, Arizona. The effects of fetal alcohol are presented to emphasize the importance of abstaining from alcohol and drugs during pregnancy.

"Alcohol in My Land." 16 mm, 28 min. 1973. Ministry of Health, Alcohol and Drug Programs, Province of B.C., Vancouver, British Columbia. Two Inuit men in Frobisher Bay attend an alcohol study group. The effect of alcohol on the Inuit is discussed.

"Alcohol: What is it?" 53 slides, 11 min. White Mountain Apache Tribe,  White River, Arizona. Topics covered include what alcohol is, where it comes from, why people drink, and its harmful effects.

"Alcohol: What it Does to Your Body." 95 slides, 13 min. White Mountain Apache Tribe, White River, Arizona. The slide program provides an introduction to the effects of alcohol on the body. It covers drinking too much and too fast, hangovers, the difference between passing out and blackouts, withdrawal, hallucinations, and delirium tremens.

"Alcoholism: What are the Signs?" White Mountain Apache Tribe, White River, Arizona. A family counselor discusses reasons that people drink, what happens to them when they drink, warning signs of alcoholism, and the help that is available for alcoholics and their families.

"All Our Business." 16mm, color, 28 min. 1985. Seneca Productions, Ottawa, Ontario. This is the story of a Native couple who invite a neighbor who is a victim of spouse abuse to stay with them until her husband gets help for his problem. ADR Rating: fair/good (3.8/6).

"American Indian Concepts of Health and Unwellness." VHS, 21 min. 1990. Native American Research and Training Center, Tucson, Arizona. An overview of the basic beliefs about health and disabilities common to the traditions of many American Indian tribes is relayed to illustrate the differences between Indian and non-Indian health beliefs.

"American Indians Against HIV/AIDS Leadership Project." VHS, 17 min. 1991. University of North Dakota Department of Family Medicine, Grand Forks, Minnesota. The video describes a project designed to educate Indian people in North Dakota about HIV/AIDS.

"Are You Listening? American Indian Families and Inhalant Abuse." VHS, 17 min. 1991. University of New Mexico Center for Indian Youth Program Development, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Inhalant abuse leads to the hospitalization of a child in San Felipe, New Mexico.

"Best of Both Worlds. Part 1: Starting a Foot Care Program. Part 2: Providing Foot Care." U-Matic, Native American Research and Training Center, Tucson, Arizona. Linwood Tall Bull, Director of the Northern Cheyenne Community Health Representatives Program in Lame Deer, Montana, explains how to start a foot care program for elders and how traditional values can be incorporated into a program. Basic foot care procedures are demonstrated.

"Body Mechanics and Transfer Techniques." U-Matic, 23 min. has dual soundtrack to accommodate the addition of a tribal language, Native American Research and Training Center, Tucson, Arizona. Reduction of the chance of injury to care-givers and patients is the goal of this production, which is set in a Native American nursing home.

"The Bonding Circle of Breast-feeding." VHS with poster and handbook, 15 min. 1991. Chromavision International, Gloucester, Ontario. The video is produced by the Association of Iroquois and Allied Indians. Its purpose is to encourage Native mothers to breast-feed. A Community Health Representative and physician explain the advantages to the mother and baby of breast-feeding, the psychology of bonding, how to breast-feed, how to involve family members in feeding the baby, and helping siblings learn about the new baby.

"The Broken Cord with Louis Erdrich and Michael Dorris." VHS, 30 min. 1992. PBS Video, Alexandria, Virginia. The authors discuss the effects of fetal alcohol syndrome on their adopted son and on Native American people.

"A Chance for Change." VHS and discussion guide, 31 min. 1990. Gryphon Productions Ltd., Vancouver, British Columbia. A young Native man returns to his rural reserve in B.C. from prison. His wife is concerned about possible exposure to AIDS. He attends a community AIDS prevention seminar and agrees to be tested. The messages conveyed are personal responsibility and the need to examine and make lifestyle changes in response to HIV. ADR Rating: good (4.4/6).

"Chief Two Tree, Cherokee Medicine Man." VHS and U-Matic, 27 min. 1986.  School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina.

"Children of Alcoholics." VHS and 16mm, 18 min. 1983. National Film Board, Toronto. The effect of alcohol on the family is discussed in this film, set in a northern Alberta town.

"Children of Wind River." U-Matic, 30 min. 1989. Wyoming Public Television, Riverton, Wyoming. Teenage suicide, alcoholism, and poverty are discussed by tribal leaders and members, health and child care providers, and social service workers on the Wind River Reservation.

"Choose Nutrition Now, It Pays." 20 min. Labrador Institute of Northern Studies, St. John's, Newfoundland. Designed to teach Aboriginal people to select affordable nutritious store food, Labrador Inuit women discuss the change from traditional foods to mass marketed food and food products.

"A Circle of Healing. Part 1: Breaking the Silence. Part 2: When the Eagle Lands on the Moon." VHS and U-Matic. CBC, Toronto.
 

"Circle of Life." 2 VHS and 4 study guides, 75 min. 1990. Leech Lake Reservation Health Division, Cass Lake, Minnesota. Teenagers relate their experiences with substance abuse, abusive relationships, teen pregnancy, and parenting. They offer advice about education, relationships, prenatal care, and family planning.

"Circle of Life: Wellness and Sexuality." VHS and 1 study guide, 11 min. 1991. Planned Parenthood of Central Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Native teens explore the issues of relationships, pregnancy and AIDS by following the story of a teenage couple who meet at a Powwow. The study guide provides a synopsis of the story and suggested study questions and activities.

"Circle of Warriors." VHS, 27 minutes. 1989. National Native American AIDS Prevention Center, Oakland, California. Ten Native Americans living with HIV infection and AIDS are asked questions by noted Native American AIDS prevention advocate Dr. Terry Tafoya. They talk about their reaction to their diagnosis, what they would want done differently, what
help clinics should provide, and the role of the medicine wheel.


"Communicating with Native American Patients." VHS, 25 min. 1988. has dual soundtrack to accommodate the addition of a tribal language, Native American Research and Training Center, Tucson, Arizona. Ellen Jackson, R.N. (Navajo) lectures on communication problems that often arise in the relationship between the Indian patient and the health care provider. She suggests ways to communicate effectively, including establishing rapport, difficulties that might occur with treatment regimens and appointment-keeping, the medicine man, and the importance of translator competence.

"Coppermine." VHS, 56 min. 1992. National Film Board of Canada, Montreal. The film portrays the health consequences to the Copper Inuit of the immigration of the Americans and British to Canada's Coronation Gulf and Victoria Island in the early 1900's.

"Cross-Cultural Issues and Risk Assessment." VHS, 30 min. 1991. Northwest Indian Child Welfare Association, Portland, Oregon. The video addresses cultural misinterpretations that can occur. These may lead to inappropriate placement decisions when using standard risk assessment tools with American Indian clients.

"Cross-Cultural Issues in Out-of-Home Care." Videotape, 26 min. Northwest Indian Child Welfare Association, Portland, Oregon. The video addresses placement of Indian children in substitute care, introduces cultural issues involved in placement decisions, and demonstrates why accommodation to the Indian Child Welfare Act is good practice.

"Crow Dog's Paradise." 16mm, color, 28 min. 1978. Centre Communications, Boulder, Colorado. Crow Dog's Paradise is a Lakota Sioux Indian enclave. The film shows the medicine man, the purification rite of the sweat lodge, medicinal uses of peyote, and the function of fasting as an avenue to enlightenment.

"Cultural Sensitivity in Health and Healing: School of Health Professions Keynote Address." VHS. 1989. NAU Television Services, Flagstaff, Arizona. The lecture is given by Agnes Marie Aamodt, an emeritus professor of Nursing and Anthropology at the University of Arizona. She speaks about the importance of recognizing cultural differences in providing health care to Native Americans.

"Culture and Disability." VHS, has dual soundtrack to accommodate the addition of a tribal language. 28 min. 1988. Native American Research and Training Center, Tucson, Arizona. Dr. Jennie R. Joe, Ph.D., M.P.H., (Navajo) delivers a paper on the relationship between culture and the perception of disability. It was presented at the Native American Long
Term Care Workshop, April 27-30, 1988 in Tucson, Arizona. She explains that what is perceived as a disability may vary from one culture to another. Disabilities among Native Americans are primarily caused by car accidents, complications of diabetes, and environmental problems such as hazardous jobs. Some people believe that disabilities are more prevalent
now because of younger people not listening to the elders and because of technology prolonging life. Disorders that do not have names in a Native language are not usually perceived as disabilities. There are differences in tolerance of disabilities among women, children and the elderly, and young males. Visible disabilities are sometimes better tolerated that those that cannot be seen.

"David's Song: American Indian Teens and AIDS." VHS and study guide, 13 minutes. 1988. University of New Mexico Center for Indian Youth Program Development, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Teenagers ask David Woodring, an Osage man with AIDS, questions about the disease and its prevention.

"Debby and Sharon - Recovery Series." VHS and 16mm, 15 min. 1985.  National Film Board of Canada, Montreal, Quebec. Two sisters from an alcoholic family have had drinking problems. Since giving up alcohol, both experience renewed pride in their Indian culture. The film highlights the perspective of Native women on the impact of problem drinking. ADR Rating: good-very good (4.9/6).

"Dene Bush Food and Canada's Food Guide." 12 min. Pido Productions Ltd., Yellowknife, N.W.T. Nutrition education is demonstrated by balancing meals with traditional foods and nutritious store foods.


"Dene Family." Videocassette, 20 min. The Dr. Otto Schaefer Resource Centre, Department of Health, Government of the Northwest Territories, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories. Traditions, skills, and values in the day-to-day life of a Dene family in a remote northern community are relayed.

"Dental Care for the Long-Term Care Patient." U-Matic, 32 min., has dual soundtrack to accommodate the addition of a tribal language. Native American Research and Training Center, Tucson, Arizona. American Indian nursing home staff learn techniques for conducting oral examinations, diagnosing lesions, and dispensing dental care to long-term patients.

"The Department of Health, Education and Welfare and the American Indian: A Report from Washington." 50 min. U-Matic, 1976. Dr. George Bluespruce, D.D.S, M.P.H., is a Pueblo who relates the frustrations of his role as the head of the Office of Native American Programs. He explains that while there is a great deal of diversity among Indian people, federal policy is based on the premise that all Indians are the same. Insufficient funding for programs and the need for improved
communication among the various government departments serving Indians are discussed.

"Diabetes and Desert Foods: Examples from O'odham Traditions." VHS, has dual soundtrack to accommodate the addition of a tribal language, 20 min. 1991. Native American Research and Training Center, Tucson, Arizona. The video shows that a traditional diet can control diabetes. There is a discussion of the reasons for the high rate of diabetes among
Indian people. Methods of reducing sugar and fat content in food are discussed. Information about the choices and availability of traditional foods in the desert is provided.

"Diabetes: Care of Skin & Feet." 47 slides, 9 min. White Mountain Apache Tribe, White River, Arizona. Skin problems in diabetics, signs of infection, and proper skin care are covered.

"Diabetes: Diet & Exercise." 65 slides, 15 min. White Mountain Apache Tribe, White River, Arizona. The contrast between traditional and modern lifestyles is related to the incidence and severity of diabetes. The role of the individual in making lifestyle choices to avoid diabetes is emphasized.

"Diabetes: What is it?" 43 slides, 5 min. White Mountain Apache Tribe, White River, Arizona. Effects of diabetes on the body, warning signs of the disease, and people most at risk are topics covered in this introductory program.

"Drinking Isn't Indian." U-Matic, 11 min. 1980. Ministry of Health, Alcohol and Drug Programs, Province of B.C., Vancouver, British Columbia. The film portrays Kakawis Residential Treatment Centre.

"Drinking: It's Your Choice!" 46 slides, 10 min. White Mountain Apache Tribe, White River, Arizona. The alternatives of abstaining, drinking too much, and exercising judgment and discretion are presented with cautions to choose wisely.

"The Effect of Heritage, Progress, and Stereotypes on Indian Health Professionals." U-Matic, 30 min. 1984. John Vaughan Library/Learning Resources Center, Northeastern Oklahoma State University, Tahlequah, Oklahoma. The speech was given by Gayle Harris at the 12th Annual Symposium on the American Indian, April 3-7, 1984, presented by the Division of Social Science, Northeastern State University.

"Every Day Choices: Alcohol and an Alaska Town." 16mm, VHS, U-Matic, 93 min. 1985. Northern Heritage. In English and Yup'ik with English voice-over. This is a documentary about the effect of alcohol on the people of the Kuskokwim River region in southwestern Alaska.

"Face to Face: Native Americans Living with the AIDS Virus." VHS and discussion guide, 45 min. 1989. National Native American AIDS Prevention Center, Oakland, California. Five interviews with Native Americans living with AIDS cover topics such as health, testing, child rearing, and discrimination. The interviewees include a young mother with AIDS, an attorney, an Alaska Native woman who has a baby that has tested positively for HIV, a young man, and a mother and her son.

"Fetal Alcohol Syndrome...A Global Issue." VHS, 35 min. 198? Native American Community Board, Lake Andes, South Dakota.

"Fighting for Our Lives: Women Confronting AIDS." VHS, 29 min. 1990. Center for Women Policy Studies, Washington, D.C. AIDS projects developed by and for women-of-color are featured. The AIDS project of the Native American Women's Health Education Center in Lake Andes, South Dakota is briefly profiled.

"Food Can Make the Difference." Videocassette, 12 min. L.M. Media Marketing Service Ltd., Markham, Ontario. The purpose of the video is to encourage the use of traditional foods. Elders teach about traditional foods and living in harmony with the environment. The effects of food habits on good health are explained.

"Getting High on Your Self." 34 slides, 8 min. White Mountain Apache Tribe, White River, Arizona. The effects of inhalant abuse and alternatives for dealing with problems and for having fun are reviewed.

"Good Medicine." VHS, 60 min. 1980. WQED, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  Originally broadcast on PBS, the video gives an overview of Native American concepts of health, shows Navajo purification rituals, and discusses what non-Natives can learn from Native American health concepts.

"Healing the Hurts." VHS, 60 min. 1989. Four Worlds Development Project, Lethbridge, Alberta. The video documents a five-day ceremony by the people of Alkali Lake to heal the psychological scars caused by residential Indian boarding schools.

"Health Care Crisis at Rosebud." 16mm, 22 min. 1977. No producer, distributor, location. The film describes health conditions on the Rosebud Sioux Reservation and problems that were encountered in trying to alleviate them.

"Health Problems in the Indian Community." U-Matic, 40 min. 1975. John Vaughan Library/Learning Resource Center, Northeastern Oklahoma State University, Tahlequah, Oklahoma. This lecture was given by Dr. Everett R. Rhodes during the 3rd Annual Symposium on the American Indian, Northeastern Oklahoma State University, May 1-2, 1975.

"Her Giveaway: A Spiritual Journal With AIDS." VHS, 22 minutes. 1987. Women Make Movies, New York. The video relates the experiences of Carole LaFavor, an Ojibway woman who discovers she has contracted AIDS through IV drug use. She uses her inner spiritual strength to manage. She emphasizes the positive aspects of being ill, such as the closer
relationship she develops with her family and friends.

"History of Indian Health." U-Matic, 50 min. 1977. Northeastern Oklahoma State University, John Vaughan Library/Learning Resources Center, Tahlequah, Oklahoma. This is a lecture by Virginia Allen.

"History of the Indian Child Welfare Act." Videotape, 40 min. Northwest Indian Child Welfare Association, Portland, Oregon. The circumstances that led to the Act, tribal and state responses, and the major features of the Act are described.

"Hit for Mike." VHS, 28 min. 1985. Seneca Productions, Ottawa, Ontario. The film relates the story of a boy who is hit by a truck while gasoline-sniffing. He is helped by a tribal elder who tells the boy of ways to feel good without using inhalants. ADR Rating: good (4.2/6).

"Honored by the Moon." VHS and U-Matic, 15 min. 1989. Women Make Movies, New York. The traditional roles that gay and lesbian people had among various Indian nations, as well as contemporary issues of homosexuality and homophobia, are examined.

"The Honour of All." VHS, U-Matic, 56 min. (Part 1), 60 min. (Part 2), 1985. The Alkali Lake Indian Band, Williams Lake, B.C. Part 1 is narrated by Andy Chelsea, Chief of the Alkali Lake Indian Band. It consists of an accounting of the change from purported rates of 100% alcoholism to 95% sobriety that occurred between 1940 and 1985. In Part 2, the community development process that occurred at Alkali Lake is outlined as various members of the Alkali Lake Band discuss the past, present, and future of the community.

"Ikajurti: The Helper: Midwifery in the Canadian Arctic." VHS, 1990. Pauktutit (Inuit Women's Association) and the Inuit Broadcasting Corporation, Ottawa, Ontario. The documentary portrays the problems encountered by Inuit women who must be flown to city hospitals to give birth and the growing movement in northern Canada to revitalize traditional Native midwifery.

"I'm Not Afraid of Me." VHS and discussion guide, 29 minutes. 1991. Alaskan Native Health Board, Anchorage, Alaska. Barbara Bryon, a young Native woman with HIV, is a musician and has a daughter with AIDS. Heterosexual transmission of HIV, maternal-fetal transmission, prevention, family support, and personal growth are covered.

"I'm Someone Who Cares: AIDS Information for Junior High School." VHS, 1989. Tri-Video, Ltd., Bismarck, North Dakota. Produced by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, the video discusses puberty, adolescence, and provides basic AIDS information. Antibody test information for North Dakota is given.

"Improving Communication with Stroke Patients." U-Matic, 24 min., has dual soundtrack to accomodate the addition of a tribal language. Native American Research and Training Center, Tucson, Arizona. The video is designed for training nursing home staff. Techniques for helping patients who have stroke-related disabilities are presented.

"Increasing Independence by Teaching Activities of Daily Living (ADL's)." U-Matic, 22 min., has a dual soundtrack to accommodate the addition of a tribal language. Native American Research and Training Center, Tucson, Arizona. The role of occupational therapists in the rehabilitation of disabled Indian adults is discussed.

"Indian Community Action in Dental Health." 16mm, 26 min. 1973. University of Colorado Medical Center, Denver. The purpose of the film is to show Indian community leaders how to organize oral health programs. The Crow Tribe in Montana is used as an example of improving oral hygiene practices, initiating a community fluoridation program, and training Community Health Representatives.

"Indian Health and the Law." U-Matic, 40 min. 1978. John Vaughan Library/Learning Resources Center, Northeastern Oklahoma State University, Tahlequah, Oklahoma. The lecture was given by Ted Risenhoover.

"Infant Care." 16mm, 12 min. 1981. North American Indian Films, Inc., Ottawa, Ontario. A community health representative visits a new mother regularly to discuss bathing her baby, breast-feeding, regular checkups, bottle preparation, and sharing parental duties.

"Introduction to the Indian Child Welfare Manual Training." Videotape, 23 min. Northwest Indian Child Welfare Association, Portland, Oregon. The video gives an overview of the Washington State Indian Child Welfare Manual of casework practice.

"Inupiat Eskimo Healing." VHS, U-Matic, 30 min. 1985. Produced by Nellie Moore. In English and Inupiaq with English subtitles. Northwest Arctic Television Center. Traditional doctors and their patients in three Inupiat villages discuss the history of medicine and healing techniques. Two non-Native doctors are interviewed and demonstrate the contrast between traditional and Western medicine.

"It Can Happen to Anybody." VHS, 22 min. 1990. Native American Women's Health Education Resource Center, Lake Andes, South Dakota. Two Indian people with AIDS discuss the reactions of their families and communities to their diagnoses.

"Just Like You." VHS, 25 min. 1988. Kahnawake Social Services, Kahnawake, Quebec. Stories of nine successful Native Canadians in the National Native Role Model Program are profiled. ADR Rating: good (4.1/6).

"Kecia: Words to Live By." VHS, 24 min. 1991. Gryphon Productions Ltd., Vancouver, British Columbia. The story of a young western Canadian Native woman who was raped, lived on the streets, and became a drug addict is related. She is HIV- positive and speaks to students about alcohol, AIDS, drug use, safe sex, and low self-esteem as a risk factor for HIV transmission. The importance of support and acceptance by family are emphasized. ADR Rating: excellent (5.6/6).

"Learning About Diabetes." Videocassette. Manitoba Health, Health Promotion, Protection and Disease Prevention, Diabetes Education Resource, Winnipeg, Manitoba. The intended audience is Aboriginal people with type II (non-insulin- dependent) diabetes and their families. It was produced in consultation with First Nations, and is available in Cree, Saulteaux and English.

"Living Safe: Knowing About AIDS." VHS, 16 min. 1989. Tri-Video, Ltd., Bismarck, North Dakota. Produced by Devil's Lake Sioux Tribe, the video provides an overview of reducing the risks of AIDS, its symptoms, and testing options. It includes antibody test information for North Dakota.

"Living with Diabetes." VHS, has dual soundtrack to accommodate the addition of a tribal language, 25 min. 1988. Native American Research and Training Center, Tucson, Arizona. Three Native Americans with diabetes discuss their experiences with the disease. They are asked about their reactions to their diagnosis, how the disease has affected their lifestyle, who they blame for the disease, how they deal with sexual dysfunction, and for advice they would give to health care providers. This is an edited version of a panel discussion from the conference, "Diabetes in Native Americans: Ideas in Education and Prevention." It is designed for patient education and for the education of health care providers.

"Make My People Live: The Crisis in Indian Health." VHS and U-Matic, 16mm, 60 min. 1984. Tri-Video Ltd., Bismarck, North Dakota. The program was produced at the time that the Indian Health Care Improvement Act was being considered for renewal. Information on the federal obligations to Indian tribes, the Indian Health Service, and a view of the delivery of medical services in four areas (Navajo, Rosebud Sioux, Creek, and Tlingit) provides an introduction to health issues of Native American people.

"Medicine People: Teaching and Healing." VHS, has dual soundtrack to accommodate the addition of a tribal language, 17 min. 1988. Native American Research and Training Center, Tucson, Arizona. The roles of medicine people in a community college, elementary and secondary schools, and an alcohol treatment program are discussed.

"Medicine Woman, Medicine Man: Traditional Holistic Medicine in Middle America." VHS, 1985. Singer-Sharrette Productions, Rochester, Michigan.

"Mending Bodies and Souls. (North of 60: Destiny Uncertain.)" U-Matic. TV Ontario, Toronto, Ontario. Issues that have affected the physical and mental health of Northern communities are explored. Community-based programs are featured.

"Mohawk Elders Speak." VHS, 25 min. 1989. Kahnawake Social Services Resource Centre, Kahnawake, Quebec. The intended audience is Native American people with diabetes, their families, and health care providers. The Diet, Education, Lifestyle and Medicine Program developed at the Kateri Memorial Hospital is described. The film emphasizes
self-management of diabetes and the importance of knowing about the disease.

"Mooshum's Gift." Video, 14 min. 1991? Saskatchewan Institute on Prevention of Handicaps, Saskatoon. The video illustrates the importance of child safety restraints and explains how family members and communities can contribute to the health and well-being of children by organizing safety seat loan programs and other activities.

"Native AIDS." VHS and U-Matic. CBC Toronto, Toronto, Ontario.

"Native American Alcohol and Substance Use." 39 slides and guide. 1989. Project Cork Institute, Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, New Hampshire.

"Native American Health Issues Series: Promotion of Traditional Foods." 4 sound cassettes and 4 script booklets. 1980. NIHB Science Centre, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado.

"Native American Health Issues Series Sound Recording: The Diabetes Package." 7 sound cassettes and 6 script booklets. 1980. NIHB Science Center, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado.

"Native American Health Issues Series Sound Recording: The Infant Feeding Package." 3 sound cassettes and 3 script booklets. 1980. NIHB Science Center, Colorado States University, Fort Collins, Colorado.

"Natives and Disability." VHS and U-Matic. CBC Toronto, Toronto, Ontario.

"Nipoo Aspiniwin." Videocassette, 24 min. Winnipeg Gay Media Collective and the Aboriginal HIV Positive Support Group, Winnipeg, Manitoba. In Swampy Cree, the video describes safer sex practices and indicates sources for prophylactics and information.

"Our Children are Our Future." 16mm, 51 min. 1982. Direction Films, Toronto, Ontario. Rated very good-excellent (5.4/6). Case studies show the problems that Native children have due to being placed in non-Native families by provincial child welfare agencies.

"Our Foods are Our Medicine, Understanding Diabetes." VHS, 28 min. 1990. Anishnawbe Health Toronto, Toronto. The intended audience is First Nations people with diabetes, their families, and health care providers. Symptoms and effects of diabetes, the role of the change in diet of Aboriginal lifestyles in the increased occurrence of diabetes, treatment, and the value of traditional healing practices are described.

"Out of Reach, Out of Danger." 50 slides, 13 min. White Mountain Apache Tribe, Whiteriver, Arizona. Prevention of accidents due to common home storage practices of potentially lethal substances is emphasized.

"Patient Rights." U-Matic, 16 min., has a dual soundtrack to accommodate the addition of a tribal language. Native American Research and Training Center, Tucson, Arizona. A skit illustrates abuses of legal rights of long-term disability patients. The "Patients' Bill of Rights" and practical situations are then discussed.

"Plans for Being Two: AIDS Information for Senior High School." VHS, 1989. Tri-Video, Ltd., Bismarck, North Dakota. Produced by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, the video provides AIDS information including the responsibilities of adulthood and responsible decision-making. Antibody test information for North Dakota is included.

"Power over Diabetes." Videocassette, 12 min. Pido Productions Limited, Yellowknife, N.W.T. The audience is First Nations people with diabetes, their families and health care providers. An aboriginal woman with diabetes describes the disease. Alsocontrolling diabetes through the balance of food, medication and exercise is discussed.

"Preparing for Parenthood." 16mm, 15 min. 1981. North American Indian Films Inc., Ottawa, Ontario. A pregnant woman visits her doctor and the community health representative. Prenatal care, fetal development, and delivery are covered.

"Prohibition in the North." U-Matic and 16mm, 26 min. 1980. Ministry of Health, Alcohol and Drug Problems, Province of B.C., Vancouver, British Columbia. The film shows the ways that four Northern communities (Fort Franklin, Pond Inlet, Igloolik, and Pangnirtung) deal with alcoholism.

"Range of Motion, Positioning and Bed Mobility." U-Matic, 24 min., has dual soundtrack to accommodate the addition of a tribal language. Tucson, Arizona: Native American Research and Training Center, Tucson, Arizona. This videotape is designed for training nursing personnel. It has a Native American cast and the setting is a Native American nursing home.

"Read Now: Jonathan." tape and photographs? Whiteriver, Arizona: White Mountain Apache Tribe, Whiteriver, Arizona. A documentary about an 18-year-old White Mountain Apache boy, Jonathan Danford, who suffered brain damage due to inhalant abuse. He relates how he became addicted, the effects of the brain damage, and his feelings about being unable to walk, talk, or care for himself.

"The Red Road: Native American Paths to Recovery." cassette tape. 1991? (#5634) Hazelden Education Materials Division, Center City, Minnesota.  Recovery stories of Apache, Blackfeet, Cree, Hopi, Klamath, Navajo, Ojibwe, and other tribes are related.

"Shadow of the Warrior: American Indian Counseling Perspectives." VHS and U-Matic, 42 min. 1985. Regional Learning Resources Services, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, St. Louis, Missouri.

"Snowdrift: Alcohol Transition." VHS and U-Matic. CBC Toronto, Toronto, Ontario.

"Someday I'll be an Elder." VHS, 25 min. 19?? Shenandoah Film Productions, Arcata, California. The film portrays the experiences of the Karuk tribe of California in moving away from alcohol and drugs to find their heritage of healthy ways. Project Renewal brings people into the community and teaches heritage while building self-esteem. Scenes from the Sulfur Springs Camp show children learning about their heritage and about the dangers of drugs and alcohol. It is narrated by Native American actor Will Sampson.

"Someplace You Don't Want to Go." VHS, 22 min. 19?? Shenandoah Film Productions, Arcata, California. Native American alcoholics, drug users, police, and community leaders are interviewed. The need for community action and unity is stressed. The background music and narration is by the well-known American Indian singer Paul Ortega.

"Something to Celebrate." VHS, 28 min. 1984. Seneca Productions, Ottawa, Ontario. This story is about a young Native couple who go to a local clinic on finding out that the woman is pregnant. They learn about the effects of drinking on the unborn child. ADR Rating: fair-good (3.5/6).

"Soul Spirit." VHS, 27 min. 1989. Anishnawbe Health Toronto, Toronto.  Ojibway Elder Joe Sylvester tells stories related to his alcoholism and recovery. Among the concepts he discusses are walking in balance and respect for yourself.

"The Spirit That Moves." VHS and U-Matic. CBC Toronto, Toronto, Ontario.

"Stress Management in the Health Care Setting." VHS, has a dual soundtrack to accommodate the addition of a tribal language, 16 min. 1988. Native American Research and Training Center, Tucson, Arizona. Dr. Paul Skinner, Ph.D., lectures on coping with stress to nursing home staff at the Long Term Care Workshop held from September 10-12, 1987. He speaks about the nature, cause, source, and management of stress. The difference between treatment and healing is discussed. The importance of the balance between spirit/mind/body harmony for harmony and homeostasis is emphasized.

"T.B. Doctor." VHS and U-Matic. CBC Toronto, Toronto, Ontario.

"Ten Weapons against Alcoholism." 10 filmstrips, 8-15 min. each. 1975. International Tele-film Ent., Toronto, Ontario. The series covers coordinating community resources, treating with antabuse, and prevention of alcoholism among Native people. ADR Rating: good (5/6).

"Tobacco, A Gift of Choice." Videocassette, 16 min. Shenandoah Film Productions, Arcata, California. Nathan Chasing His Horse describes the traditional use of tobacco for spiritual purposes. He speaks against the use of tobacco for recreation.

"Traditional Inupiat Eskimo Health Series." VHS, U-Matic, 1" vt. In Inupiaq or English. Northwest Arctic Video. "Community Health Aides: The Vital Link." 29 min. "Ignipkainailhat/Traditional Prenatal Care." Parts I and II, 30 min. each. "Ilussig and Uniqtit/Manipulation and Dislocation." 22 min. "Iyat/Hot Springs." 14 min. "Kapi/Poking and Bloodletting." 16 min. The programs are used to teach health practitioners in northwest Alaska. They are designed to preserve traditional Inupiat healing techniques.

"Turnaround: A Story of Recovery." VHS, U-Matic, and 16mm, 46 min. 1984.  NFB, Calgary, Alberta. Alcoholism in women is the focus of this film. One woman is Native. The women are educated about addiction, nutrition, and life skills.

"Walking in Balance." Videocassette, 25 min. 1985. Canadian Diabetes Association, Toronto. The intended audience is providers of health care to Aboriginal people with diabetes. Storytelling is used to teach about the incidence, etiology, and symptoms of diabetes among First Nations people and about cross-cultural differences which may be obstacles to patient education.

"Walking in Pain." VHS, 50 min. 1988. Kinetic Inc., Canada. A senior counselor at the Native Round Lake Treatment Centre helps Native clients understand and overcome the causes of their substance abuse. ADR Rating: good (4.2/6).

"The Washington Tribal-State Agreement." Videotape, 29 min. (Part I), 22 min. (Part II). Northwest Indian Child Welfare Association, Portland, Oregon. Part I provides a tribal perspective on the history and development of the Agreement and its relationship to the Washington State Indian Child Welfare Manual. Part II provides the state perspective on the Agreement.

"We are These People." VHS, 14 min. 198? Shenandoah Film Productions, Arcata, California. Will Sampson narrates this film on the spiritual heritage of Indian communities. Friendships and family as major healing traditions and sources of positive medicine are stressed. The connection between spirit and body for wholeness and the importance of balance rather than excess in Indian tradition are brought out.

"We Look-You Look: Perspectives on Acculturation." VHS, has dual sound track to accommodate the addition of a tribal language. 20 min. 1989. Native American Research and Training Center, Tucson, Arizona. Judith Black Feather, R.N., M.P.H., discusses Native American cultural values and philosophies, including concepts of time, values, death, social interaction, religion, child rearing, and behavior.

"We Owe It to Ourselves and to Our Children." Videocassette, 8 min. National Native American AIDS Prevention Center, Oakland, California. Cartoon images and live action Native health educators discuss the causes, symptoms, treatments, and prevention of HIV and sexually transmitted diseases.

"What Happened to Mike? American Indian Youth and Suicide." VHS, 13 min. 1990. University of New Mexico Center for Indian Youth Program Development, Albuquerque, New Mexico. This trigger tape tracks a day in the life of a high school senior who attempts suicide. He is pressured to win a track scholarship, feels alienated from his family and friends, and is unable to cope with his problems.

"What Will Jerri Do? American Indian Youth and Inhalant Abuse." VHS, 13 min. 1991. University of New Mexico Center for Indian Youth Program Development, Albuquerque, New Mexico. A teenage girl experiences peer pressure to try inhalants. The girl's grandfather provides a traditional perspective on substance abuse. She discusses the physiological effects of inhalant abuse with a physician. The purpose of the film is to stimulate discussion among teenagers and to educate them about inhalant abuse.

"Why Me?" Videocassette, 30 min. 1988. Medical Services Branch, Ontario Region, Health and Welfare Canada, Nepean, Ontario. The intended audience is newly-diagnosed persons with diabetes and their families. A 35-year-old pilot is diagnosed with diabetes. His experiences in coping with the disease and the role of elders and family in helping are
portrayed.

 




LIST OF PRODUCERS/DISTRIBUTORS

Alaskan Native Health Board 1345 Rudakof Circle, #206 Anchorage, Alaska 99508 (907) 274-2892

Alkali Lake Indian Band Box 4479 Williams Lake, British Columbia V2G 2V5

Anishnawbe Health Toronto 761 Queen St. W. Toronto, Ontario M6J 1G1 (416) 360-0486

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Box 500, Station A Toronto, Ontario M5W 1E6 PHONE: (416) 205-6384 FAX: (416) 205-3482

Canadian Diabetes Association 78 Bond Street Toronto, Ontario M5B 2J8 PHONE: (416) 362-4440 FAX: (416) 362-6849

Center for Women Policy Studies 2000 P St. N.W., Suite 508 Washington, D.C. 20036 (212) 872-1770

Centre Communications 1800 30th Street, Suite 207 Boulder, Colorado 80301 PHONE: (303) 444-1166 FAX: (303) 444-1168

Chromavision International, Inc. 1172 rue Rainbow St. Gloucester, Ontario K1J 6X7 PHONE: (613) 748-5335 FAX: (613) 748-1073

Direction Films 92 Scarborough Road Toronto, Ontario (416) 690-7038

East Carolina University School of Medicine Greenville, North Carolina 27858-4354 PHONE: (919) 551-2201 FAX: (919) 551-3192

Government of the Northwest Territories The Dr. Otto Schaefer Health Resource Centre Department of Health 2nd Floor, Centre Square Tower Yellowknife, Northwest Territories X1A 2L9 PHONE: (403) 873-7713 FAX:  (403) 873-7706

Gryphon Productions, Ltd. P.O. Box 93009 5331 Headland Drive West-Vancouver, British Columbia V7W 3C0 (604) 921-7627 FAX: (604) 921-7626

Hazelden Educational Materials Division 15251 Pleasant Valley Road P.O. Box 176 Center City, Minnesota 55102-0176 PHONE: (800) 328-9000 or (612) 257-4010

Health and Welfare Canada Medical Services Branch, Ontario Region 1547 Merivale Road, 3rd Floor Nepean, Ontario K1A 0L3 PHONE: (613) 952-0089 FAX: (613) 952-7733

International Tele-Film Ent. 47 Densley Avenue Toronto, Ontario M6M 5A8 (416) 241-4483

Kahnawake Social Services Resource Centre P.O. Box 927 Kahnawake, Quebec J0L 1B0 (514) 638-3199

Kinetic, Inc. 408 Dundas St. E. Toronto, Ontario M5A 2A5 PHONE: (416) 963-5979 FAX: (416) 925-0653

Labrador Institute of Northern Studies Memorial University of Newfoundland P.O. Box 4200 St. John's, Newfoundland A1C 5S7 PHONE: (709) 737-8212 FAX: (709) 737-4569

Leech Lake Reservation Health Division Rte. 3 Cass Lake, Minnesota 56633 (218) 335-8200

L.M. Media Marketing Service, Ltd. 115 Torbay Rd., Unit 9 Markham, Ontario L3R 2M9 (416) 475-3750

Manitoba Health Health Promotion, Protection and Disease Prevention Diabetes Education Resource 599 Empress St., P.O. Box 925 Winnipeg, Manitoba R3C 2T6 PHONE: (204) 786-7372 FAX: (204) 775-3142

Ministry of Health, Alcohol and Drug Programs, Province of B.C. #201-1755 W. Broadway Vancouver, British Columbia V6J 4S5 731-9121 local 32

National Film Board P.O. Box 6100, Sta. A Montreal, Quebec H3C 3H5 PHONE: (514) 283-9428 FAX: (514) 283-7564

National Film Board National Film Board 1 Lombard Street 2959 Station M, 222 1st Street S.E. Toronto, Ontario M5C 1S0 Calgary, Alberta T2P 3C3

National Native American AIDS Prevention Center 3515 Grand Avenue Suite 100 Oakland, California 94610 PHONE: (510) 444-2051 FAX: (510) 444-1593

Native American Community Board Lake Andes, South Dakota 57356

Native American Research and Training Center Department of Family and Community Medicine University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona 85719 PHONE: (602) 621-5075 FAX: (602) 621-9802

Native American Women's Health Education Resource Center P.O. Box 572 Lake Andes, South Dakota 57356-0572 PHONE: (605) 487-7072 FAX: (605) 487-7964

NAU Television Services Flagstaff, Arizona

New Mexico Health and Environment Department AIDS Prevention Program

NIHB Science Centre Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 PHONE: (303) 491-1101 FAX: (303) 491-0501

North American Indian Films Inc. 177 Nepean Street Ottawa, Ontario K2P 0B4

Northeastern Oklahoma State University John Vaughan Library/Learning Resources Center Tahlequah, Oklahoma 74464-2398 PHONE: (918) 456-5511 x3276 FAX: (918) 458-2197

Northwest Arctic Video

Northwest Arctic Television Center

Northwest Indian Child Welfare Institute c/o Regional Research Institute P.O. Box 751 Portland, Oregon 79207 (503) 229-3038

Pauktuutit: Inuit Women's Association 200 Elgin Street, Suite 804 Ottawa, Ontario K2P 1L5 PHONE: (613) 238-3977 FAX: (613) 238-1787

PBS Video Public Broadcasting Service PTV Archives 1320 Braddock Place Alexandria, Virginia 22314-1698 PHONE: (800) 344-3337 or (703) 739-5014 FAX: (703) 739-5269

Pido Productions, Ltd.-no information available Yellowknife, Northwest Territories

Planned Parenthood of Central Oklahoma 619 N.W. 23rd Street Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73103-1415 (405) 525-0221

Project Cork Institute Dartmouth Medical School HB 6215 Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (603) 646-3935

Saskatchewan Institute on Prevention of Handicaps Royal University Hospital Box 81 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 0X0 (306) 966-2512

Seneca Productions 77 Metcalfe Street, Suite 604 Ottawa, Ontario K1H 5T7 (613) 230-6127

Shenandoah Film Productions 538 G Street Arcata, California 95521 (707) 822-1030 or (616) 536-0015

Singer-Sharrette Productions 52370 Dequindre Rochester, Michigan 48063 (313) 731-5199

Tri-Video, Ltd. 541 S. Airport Road Bismarck, North Dakota 58504 (701) 222-8026

TV Ontario Box 200, Station Q Toronto, Ontario M4T 2T7

University of Colorado Health Sciences Center 4200 East 9th Avenue Denver, Colorado 80262 PHONE: (303) 399-1211 FAX: (303) 270-7729

University of Lethbridge Four Worlds Development Project 4401 University Drive Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3M4 (403) 329-2065 FAX: (403) 329-3081

University of New Mexico Department of Pediatrics Center for Indian Youth Program Development Surge Building, 2nd Floor Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131-5311 (505) 277-4462/6737

University of North Dakota Department of Family Medicine 501 N. Columbia Rd. Grand Forks, North Dakota 58203 PHONE: (701) 777-3240 FAX: (701) 777-3849

Upstream Productions 420 1st Ave. W. Seattle, Washington 98119 PHONE: (206) 281-9177 FAX: (206) 284-6963

Veterans Affairs Medical Center Regional Learning Resources Services St. Louis, Missouri 63125 (314) 487-0400

White Mountain Apache Tribe P.O. Box 1210 Whiteriver, Arizona 85941 (602) 338-4953

Winnipeg Gay Media Collective-no information available Winnipeg, Manitoba

Women Make Movies 225 Lafayette Street, Suite 207 New York, New York PHONE: (212) 925-0606 FAX: (212) 925-2052

WQED 4802 5th Avenue Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 PHONE: (412) 622-1367 FAX: (412) 622-1488

Wyoming Public Television KCWC-TV c/o Central Wyoming College 2660 Peck Avenue Riverton, Wyoming 82501 (307) 856-9291

Sharon A. Gray, M.L.S., B.A., is an Associate Librarian and Head of the Information Services Department of the Health Sciences Library, State University of New York at Buffalo.

Edward R. Starr, PhD, M.A., is Assistant Professor, Counseling & Educational Psychology at the State University of New York at Buffalo.

MC JOURNAL: THE JOURNAL OF ACADEMIC MEDIA LIBRARIANSHIP Vol. 1 #2 Fall 1993 ISSN 1069-6792 October 27, 1993

 


Health of Native People of North America: An Annotated Mediagraphy
http://wings.buffalo.edu/publications/mcjrnl/v1n2/gray.html

MC Journal: The Journal of Academic Media Librarianship, v1 no.2, Fall 1993:70-100.

Submitted by Andre Cramblit andrekar@ncidc.org
 


 

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