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1,000 Earthquakes Hit Yellowstone Super Volcano

 

 

Quakes keep rattling Yellowstone; 3.7 and 3.8 magnitude recorded

 Posted: Jan 22, 2010 12:07 PM
 

A slew of earthquakes continues to rattle Yellowstone National Park with the park seeing two of its largest quakes in the recent swarm during the last 24 hours.

 

A magnitude 3.7 earthquake was recorded at 11:01 p.m. Wednesday, according to the University of Utah Seismograph Station's Web site. Minutes later, at 11:16 p.m., a magnitude 3.8 quake shook the park. Seven earthquakes were reported in the park during the 11 p.m. hour Wednesday.

 

So far, more than 500 earthquakes have been recorded in the park since the swarm began on Sunday.

 

 

The swarm, which is located about 10 miles northwest of Old Faithful and nine miles southeast of West Yellowstone, began at 1 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 17, according to a news release issued Tuesday.

 

The swarm is not unusual and that there is no indication of premonitory volcanic or hydrothermal activity, Experts from the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory partners of the U.S. Geol. Survey, the University of Utah, and the National Park Service said in a press release issued earlier this week. The earthquakes are likely related to tectonic fault sources, they said.

 

(From Jan. 20, 2009)

 

A swarm of earthquakes continues to rattle Yellowstone National Park.

 

As of 7:30 a.m. Wednesday, about 15 more earthquakes were recorded in the park, adding to the 469 that shook the park between Sunday and Tuesday afternoon, according to the University of Utah Seismograph Station's Web site. The swarm, which is located about 10 miles northwest of Old Faithful and nine miles southeast of West Yellowstone, began at 1 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 17, according to a news release issued Tuesday.

 

The largest new quake recorded since a news release was issued on the swarm Tuesday afternoon happened at about 9:41 p.m. Tuesday had a magnitude of 3.3, according to the University of Utah Seismograph Station. Another magnitude 3.5 quake was recorded at 2:31 p.m. Tuesday.

 

There have been multiple reports of ground shaking from observations inside the park and in neighboring communities in Montana and Idaho for some of the larger events. 

 

"Earthquake swarms of this nature are relatively common in Yellowstone National Park," states a news release issued Tuesday by the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory partners of the U.S. Geol. Survey, the University of Utah, and the National Park Service. "At this time the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory does not consider the swarm to be unusual and the earthquakes are likely related to tectonic fault sources.  Also there is no indication of premonitory volcanic or hydrothermal activity, but ongoing analyses will evaluate these different sources.

 

Information on the earthquake can be viewed at the University of Utah  Seismograph Stations.

Seismograph recordings from stations of the Yellowstone seismograph station

Anyone who has felt earthquakes in the swarm are encouraged to fill out a form on the USGS Community Felt

 

(From Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2010)

 

Over the past two days, 469 earthquakes have rattled Yellowstone National Park.

 

The swarm, which is located about 10 miles northwest of Old Faithful and nine miles southeast of West Yellowstone, began at 1 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 17, according to a news release issued Tuesday.

 

The largest earthquake in the swarm, as of 3 p.m. Tuesday was a magnitude 3.5 event that occurred at 2:31 p.m. Tuesday. The swarm has included five events of magnitude larger than 3, with 34 events of magnitude 2 to 3, and 430 events of magnitude less than 2, according to the news release prepared by the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory partners of the U.S. Geol. Survey, the University of Utah, and the National Park Service.

 

There have been multiple reports of ground shaking from observations inside the park and in neighboring communities in Montana and Idaho for some of the larger events. 

 

"Earthquake swarms of this nature are relatively common in Yellowstone National Park," the news release states. "At this time the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory does not consider the swarm to be unusual and the earthquakes are likely related to tectonic fault sources.  Also there is no indication of premonitory volcanic or hydrothermal activity, but ongoing analyses will evaluate these different sources.

 

Information on the earthquake can be viewed at the University of Utah Seismograph Stations.

Seismograph recordings from stations of the Yellowstone seismograph station 

Anyone who has felt earthquakes in the swarm are encouraged to fill out a form on the USGS Community Felt reports Web site.

 

Source:  http://www.kpax.com/news/quakes-keep-rattling-yellowstone-37-and-38-mag-recorded/

 

 

 

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